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Discussion Starter #1
I have just bought an AR-15 and it is my first automatic rifle. I'm thinking about contacting some gun shops
and see if any of them have a training course on field striping, cleaning and maybe even some pointers on
shooting this firearm. I know we all like to think of our self as experts. But I have learned that it seems there
is always something to learn on a subject you thought you were an expert on.
So would I look like a sissy doing this?
 

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Get a good video. If you just have somebody "show you how". Unless you have a photographic memory your certain to forget important little details as time passes. AR's above all have ridiculous little springs that go flying, gas rings that need lined up (offset properly I guess I should say), and a dozen other design flaws you need to monitor for wear, contamination, other problems.

Free: AGI AR15 armorers video (download torrent) - TPB
 

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Get a good video. If you just have somebody "show you how". Unless you have a photographic memory your certain to forget important little details as time passes. AR's above all have ridiculous little springs that go flying, gas rings that need lined up (offset properly I guess I should say), and a dozen other design flaws you need to monitor for wear, contamination, other problems.

Free: AGI AR15 armorers video (download torrent) - TPB
yes I bet you are right that's why I'm looking to get some hands on training. My AR is still sitting in the box in the wrapper
and has never been fired I don't want to get into any self taught bad habits.
But thanks for the video that's a great idea also.
 

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Training is always good. It doesn't make you a wussy in any way to look to learn what you don't know. Not doing so, actually makes you a moron. Something to take into mind with gunshops is that just because someone works in or owns a gunshops, doesn't make them an expert in every weapon. Even though the military heavily over cleans weapons in my experience and opinion, there still good at methods for breaking them down and putting them back together. I'm not saying join the military, but you might look for a vet who can help you understand the rifle more. Even at the range there are normally guys who would be happy to help a fellow gun owner learn his new rifle. There is certainly a lot of info on the net and great books and videos to be had. One point to remember with a direct impingement AR is, it loves lube and doesn't like running dry. Even if one may run well dry, remember that lack of lubrication, means more wear on the parts and them fighting harder to do there job.


Field stripping the AR15 (massive pics) - AR15.COM

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_3_7/548967_AR15_LUBE_POINTS.html
 

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Really? "Ridiculous little springs that go flying..."? Really? I will have to call pure BS on that. What springs are that? When do they go flying? I have dealt with M-16's/AR's for nearly 40 years and cant remember ever having a "little spring go flying" in all that time.
I agree. No offense to BigCheeseStick, but he obviously hates the AR-15/M16 platform. It is quite easy to disassemble and reassemble them once you learn and nothing necessarily goes "flying". While I have no great love for the direct impingement operating myself, it still works fairly well if you maintain it well enough. There are better ways to run a rifle in my opinion though.
 

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I love my AR, He might be talking about the "Buffer Retainer Spring" , underneath the "Buffer Retainer". I was switching out that little plate behind the handle on the stock so I could clip on a sling and that baby went flying! I had to order one -_- I couldn't find it anywhere. My fault though.. the YouTube guy even said "watch out here or you may lose the spring" I was saying to myself "what sp- oh.... that one"
 

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I have just bought an AR-15 and it is my first automatic rifle. I'm thinking about contacting some gun shops
and see if any of them have a training course on field striping, cleaning and maybe even some pointers on
shooting this firearm. I know we all like to think of our self as experts. But I have learned that it seems there
is always something to learn on a subject you thought you were an expert on.
So would I look like a sissy doing this?
No need the AR is a simple weapon. There are a 1000' s youtube videos on the subject of cleaning on.
There is no need to strip all the parts in the lower the rest is simple. Some are going to scream when I say this over cleaning the barrle cause more damage than shooting it. Shoot good ammo every 500 rounds or so .
Another point there are a 100 different miracle lubes and cleaner they will try to sell you plan old CLP
Please avoid the fancy carb and spray cleaners they are hard on the finish no madder what anyone says.


 

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You bought an ar15 automatic? Really? /s/

Try a semiautomatic ar15.
 
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Person to person instruction best way to learn. Video or written back up? Humans have memories and memories fail particularly if your interests are elsewhere. AR not my choice but whatever you choose learn it well.
 

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The vast majority of people will defend any purchase they've made to the death out of personal pride (yes I own an AR, yes I've worked with a few dozen both military and civilian).

I don't in anyway "hate" the AR platform. As an engineer myself, I disrespect it's pi$$ poor, disastrous principles of operation. EVERY operating and engineering principal of the entire weapon is foolishly flawed to a point my daughter could point out most of them herself at 9yrs old. :/

YET, it's a trendy rifle that will never go away because its in movies, and "the military used it" (they were forced to against their wishes because of political pay offs. Do the research).

To each their own. The good news is there's a sucker born every minute, so they'll never loose their value!
View attachment 2895

I just invite people to do enough research to learn what they've REALLY bought.
 

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I have just bought an AR-15 and it is my first automatic rifle. I'm thinking about contacting some gun shops
and see if any of them have a training course on field striping, cleaning and maybe even some pointers on
shooting this firearm. I know we all like to think of our self as experts. But I have learned that it seems there
is always something to learn on a subject you thought you were an expert on.
So would I look like a sissy doing this?
Absolutely not! I think that is a very wise decision that everyone should do. Take a hunter safety course even though you don't hunt. Take a beginner shooting course even though you have been shooting for years. Why? Because your never too old to learn something new and any training is good training.
 

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So would I look like a sissy doing this?
No, you wouldn't look like a sissy unless you wear tie-dye camo or extend your pinky while changing mags. Many of us here (the ex-military and LE types) have had the benefit of training with experts. Watching videos is better than nothing, but the best possible way is to have an expert show you. You don't get any feedback by watching a video or reading a book. Taking a class allows you to have someone right there to stop you and show you what yer doing wrong right as it happens.

Not everyone who claims to be an expert is actually an expert though, but that's another topic altogether.
 

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I have temporarily lost a retaining pin spring when it shot across the room, it does happen, you have a spring on each pin that holds the upper and lower together, one that holds the safety detent pin under the pistol grip, the spring under the disconnector, and the one under the extractor, any of which can go flying if you are careless. I have built 3 AR's there is nothing "wrong" with the design, you can have one in 300 blackout if you desire the performance of an AK (except more accurate) I also have an AK47 I built from a Romanian parts kit years ago, it is the easiest to clean and maintain but a lot more work to build. There are a lot of good books out there on the AR and there is nothing wrong with learning about equipment your life may rely on one day.
 

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Absolutely not! I think that is a very wise decision that everyone should do. Take a hunter safety course even though you don't hunt. Take a beginner shooting course even though you have been shooting for years. Why? Because your never too old to learn something new and any training is good training.
Couldn't agree more. This is your best advice. ^^^^

My wife and I continue our training and despite what we have taken and done, we usually attend a basics class, handgun or carbine to refresh the basics and not get complacent.
 
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Personally, I am with the Big Cheese. My pistols are more aggravating to assemble, and I use You Tube. Not that I mind looking like a novice at a damned thing. I'd just rather be at the house, drinking coffee and being distracted by Ziva David on NCIS on the TV while learning.

Still, the LGS conveniently located 1.5 minutes from the house is a great place to ask questions. The owner even gives classes to those who are looking for the exact information you want. I'll bet you have a nearby gun shop that has what you need! Hey, on top of that info, your LGS (local gun shop) is a great place to meet people with similar interests.

By the way. I carried the M-16 and M16A1 for a few years. A lot of people whined about it not being a good rifle. I never had one failure to eject or failure to fire, and I could castrate a gnat with it. I never came across a flying spring, though I have been on hands and knees looking for the roller pin that keeps the extractor attached to the bolt. :mrgreen:

Enjoy your rifle!
 

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Personally, I am with the Big Cheese. My pistols are more aggravating to assemble, and I use You Tube. Not that I mind looking like a novice at a damned thing. I'd just rather be at the house, drinking coffee and being distracted by Ziva David on NCIS on the TV while learning.

Still, the LGS conveniently located 1.5 minutes from the house is a great place to ask questions. The owner even gives classes to those who are looking for the exact information you want. I'll bet you have a nearby gun shop that has what you need! Hey, on top of that info, your LGS (local gun shop) is a great place to meet people with similar interests.

By the way. I carried the M-16 and M16A1 for a few years. A lot of people whined about it not being a good rifle. I never had one failure to eject or failure to fire, and I could castrate a gnat with it. I never came across a flying spring, though I have been on hands and knees looking for the roller pin that keeps the extractor attached to the bolt. :mrgreen:

Enjoy your rifle!
<<<raises hand and nods head. But....it was a long time ago :)

Ok you got me my terminologically is off. I stand corrected,, So is my bolt action rifle a stick shift?
Ima little bit askeered of what you call yer pump action shotgun:eek::-D
 

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Actually getting some help is a good idea, for the folks in the military disassembly of the AR style rifle is second nature, and for those who have served it's so deeply engrained it might as well be. For all others a bit of help getting started is far better than winging it.
 
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