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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the things I prep for is an extended grid down scenario. While I'm prepared to live without the 'net, my computer and other electronic gadgets, there are some luxuries I'd really rather have if possible. I thought it might be fun for each of us to talk about the things we wouldn't want to live without and come up with workarounds that would keep us going after the crash.

My #1 luxury I would hate to go without is coffee. I already use a French press, so I need a way to store beans, grind them and heat the water. To that end, I picked up a vintage manual coffee grinder (works like a charm!), stored whole roasted beans in glass with O2 absorbers and am going to buy a Kelly Kettle for boiling the water.

Another thing I'd really miss is my electric razor. All that nuisance hair you know...:D So, what are my choices? Battery operated? Mine is currently rechargeable. Could I get a hand crank charger that would charge something like that?

Your turn. What would you like to keep that wouldn't be so easy to have in a grid down scenario?
 

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Ok I live S. Texas so A/C and refrigeration. Im working towards Geo Thermal AC and wind generation and a back up steam generator
 

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Air conditioning it just takes to much energy to run to be practical when the power is down. Everything else I can power with a 60 watt folding solar panel and lithium power pack that I can take anywhere and set up in a minute or two. I love coffee but I believe that I could get used to drinking some type of tea like sarsaparilla that grows locally in the woods and was very popular in the 1800's actually still is but it's called root bear now.
 

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Gunner's Mate, my friend, you need to be worried about water!

My biggest concern, after water, seems to be communication for security purposes. Past that, I'd have to say the summer heat in Texas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So to those of you in the south, is it possible just to acclimate? We get in the high 90s and low 100s here in the summer, but don't use an AC. It typically gets to the high 80s in the kitchen, but we get used to it. The only exception is a small fan in the bedroom at night. Ours is also a dry heat, which helps. I know it gets hotter there, but people used to live there before AC so what would it take to get used to doing without?

I'd love to get solar here but it wouldn't work at all in the winter. I suppose solar all summer is better than none at all.

RfQ, close range communication? Could you power a charger for handhelds off a solar panel?
 

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Solar is an option, but I also wandered across plans for a bicycle powered generator that is pretty straight forward. As for heat, we run pretty high humidity, so while acclimation is doable it's gonna be very gradual and painful.
 

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So to those of you in the south, is it possible just to acclimate? We get in the high 90s and low 100s here in the summer, but don't use an AC. It typically gets to the high 80s in the kitchen, but we get used to it. The only exception is a small fan in the bedroom at night. Ours is also a dry heat, which helps. I know it gets hotter there, but people used to live there before AC so what would it take to get used to doing without?
It's funny, a lot of people I know will crank the AC in the summer until their house is around 60-65 degrees. But if it drops below 80 in the winter, they complain that it's cold.

I vote for acclimate.
 

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I have 2 wells an electric and wind and 25,000 gal cistern and rain water catch system got the water covered including distillation and purification
Gunner's Mate, my friend, you need to be worried about water!

My biggest concern, after water, seems to be communication for security purposes. Past that, I'd have to say the summer heat in Texas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
We heat with wood so it's always 80 in my kitchen in both summer and winter. No matter when it is, we're hot!

So, really, back to my hairy armpits. Would a hand crank generator recharge an item like an electric razor? I'm wondering if I should find a disposable battery operated one and just stock way up on batteries. I'd like to avoid a generator because of the cost and because I don't think I'd be able to stock enough fuel for it so I'd rather learn to live without power in general. I have stocked up on extra disposable razors, but since we're talking about things we'd like to have versus need, I'd like to figure out how to keep the electric one running.
 

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So to those of you in the south, is it possible just to acclimate? We get in the high 90s and low 100s here in the summer, but don't use an AC. It typically gets to the high 80s in the kitchen, but we get used to it. The only exception is a small fan in the bedroom at night. Ours is also a dry heat, which helps. I know it gets hotter there, but people used to live there before AC so what would it take to get used to doing without?

I'd love to get solar here but it wouldn't work at all in the winter. I suppose solar all summer is better than none at all.

RfQ, close range communication? Could you power a charger for handhelds off a solar panel?
1. You need to understand that Texas has 2 seasons, summer and almost summer. Try multiple 100+ days with no AC. Not pleasant I can tell you. People do die here from that too.

2. As a ham, I have 4 deep cycle batteries that will run my gear. Once my power supply bit the big one. I ran a 2m/440 radio on med power, talked as normal and a month later I was still on the same battery when I got my new power supply.

ETA: When your razor goes belly up, have you considered acclimation?
 

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straight razor should do the trick no batts required. I remember the 1st time I got a shave with straight razor i looked like I had been to plastic surgeon little old Puerto Rican guy with not so steady hands
We heat with wood so it's always 80 in my kitchen in both summer and winter. No matter when it is, we're hot!

So, really, back to my hairy armpits. Would a hand crank generator recharge an item like an electric razor? I'm wondering if I should find a disposable battery operated one and just stock way up on batteries. I'd like to avoid a generator because of the cost and because I don't think I'd be able to stock enough fuel for it so I'd rather learn to live without power in general. I have stocked up on extra disposable razors, but since we're talking about things we'd like to have versus need, I'd like to figure out how to keep the electric one running.
 
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look on amazon there are little solar panel packs that fit into back packs that will charge something like that... As for a hand crank generator that you have asked about several times... Yes you can and it will work well... others take a work out bike and connect it in a fashion that turns it not only into a work out machine but you have a wheat grinder if set up correctly and or a charging station.. Generally you let the kids run it as they seem to be full of energy lol...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
1. You need to understand that Texas has 2 seasons, summer and almost summer. Try multiple 100+ days with no AC. Not pleasant I can tell you. People do die here from that too.

ETA: When your razor goes belly up, have you considered acclimation?
I'm not saying it would be fun, just posing it as an option and not one I would envy. Air conditioning is relatively new (1902 according to WP), while the Europeans settled in Texas in the 1600s (also according to WP); the Spaniards and natives much earlier. The point is, it can be done. I've lived in Vegas, which is pretty warm in the summer, so I can well imagine how difficult it would be. It just seems that working to be acclimated, be it by setting the thermostat higher or gradually getting rid of the AC might make the transition easier if ever there was a total grid down situation.

On to my own acclimation: :lol: I imagine it would bother me a whole lot less than the people around me. In fact, that's a great time to set some new societal norms. Brilliant! When TSHTF, I make a motion than men, rather than women, should shave their pits and legs. Bring it, apocalypse! ;)

look on amazon there are little solar panel packs that fit into back packs that will charge something like that... As for a hand crank generator that you have asked about several times... Yes you can and it will work well... others take a work out bike and connect it in a fashion that turns it not only into a work out machine but you have a wheat grinder if set up correctly and or a charging station.. Generally you let the kids run it as they seem to be full of energy lol...
Thanks, BA! I just wasn't sure a panel would work for a slow charging item. We're already planning on the bike powered grain mill, so I'll look into expanding that concept.
 

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I'm not saying it would be fun, just posing it as an option and not one I would envy. Air conditioning is relatively new (1902 according to WP), while the Europeans settled in Texas in the 1600s (also according to WP); the Spaniards and natives much earlier. The point is, it can be done. I've lived in Vegas, which is pretty warm in the summer, so I can well imagine how difficult it would be. It just seems that working to be acclimated, be it by setting the thermostat higher or gradually getting rid of the AC might make the transition easier if ever there was a total grid down situation.
Don't get me wrong, I have worked in that weather. But now that we are members of the OFC (that's old farts club for you youngins) it will be a whole lot harder.

On to my own acclimation: :lol: I imagine it would bother me a whole lot less than the people around me. In fact, that's a great time to set some new societal norms. Brilliant! When TSHTF, I make a motion than men, rather than women, should shave their pits and legs. Bring it, apocalypse! ;)
You really don't want to see me with bare legs, that would even scare off the bad guys. My legs haven't seen the sun in over 10 yrs.
 

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Indie im catching hell on the ( your campaign Forum) need your support
We heat with wood so it's always 80 in my kitchen in both summer and winter. No matter when it is, we're hot!

So, really, back to my hairy armpits. Would a hand crank generator recharge an item like an electric razor? I'm wondering if I should find a disposable battery operated one and just stock way up on batteries. I'd like to avoid a generator because of the cost and because I don't think I'd be able to stock enough fuel for it so I'd rather learn to live without power in general. I have stocked up on extra disposable razors, but since we're talking about things we'd like to have versus need, I'd like to figure out how to keep the electric one running.
 

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Find out what voltage and amperage your charger puts out and you can put together a charger for it. Solar - bicycle with alternator or wind - or a combination of the best ones for your area and needs.
 

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There are several simple ways to cool your house without using much power, if any.

My favorite is a solar siphon, which is like a tall skinny box you put on your roof. One side of the box is glass, so the air heats up and rises, then vents out the top. The bottom is vented to the ceiling of the room you want to cool. As the sun heats the air in the box, it sucks out the hottest air in the room automatically and with no energy used. You then cut a vent in the floor on the shady side of the house or to the basement if you have one and as the hot air is sucked out, it draws cooler air in and creates a little air movement.

The neat thing about a solar siphon is that, the sunnier it is, the faster it draws, so the whole thing is self-regulating. With no moving parts and no energy consumption, it's kind of surprising these aren't used a lot more than they are.

If you live in a low humidity area, the swamp cooler is another good option. They don't use much electricity, and work pretty well.

You can also bury a ground loop and run a fluid through the loop and then through a liquid/air heat exchanger. Systems like this only use enough electricity to run a small pump and a fan, which doesn't take a lot.

Sorry for hijacking the thread, I'll shut up now.
 

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Living in Florida, refrigeration & ice. Work around is solar system that operates a 5cuft chest freezer so can make plenty of ice & use a large cooler for a frig.

I have a deep well & when loosing electric will loose the water from the well. Have a generator that will power the pump but fuel will only go so far. Work around is a rain collection & storage system with some good ceramic filters.
 
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