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Discussion Starter #1
I live in the Pacific Northwest. It is a wet environment with a few soft freezes per year and perhaps 1-2 hard freezes. What sort of crops would be viable to plant in this environment during winter ?

What works in the area you live in ?
 

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Yes. I did some reading and it seems some root stuff will do well garlic, carrots, turnips, beets etc. All these will do well with a small shelter and hay bales for insulation. Too late this year but now I have a building project to do.
 

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I do well growing ice. I fill up water jugs and watch them freeze. Then I toss small,hard objects at them very fast to watch the impact reaction.

The farmers down the street grow something in the winter, perhaps I should ask them what.
 

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I've been really fascinated with the study of aquaponics this month. I am planning on looking into setting up a couple inside aquaponics systems using 10 gallon aquariums to see how it works.I plan to grow herbs and regenerate used veggies (Vegetables You Can Eat and Replant (plants forum at permies)). It might be something for you to think about. Some people use goldfish because they're hardy, other people use perch or tilapia which are edible.

I loved this video. If you watch it all the way through he shows you an inside system too:
 

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If you can't afford a greenhouse... you could consider cold frames. They don't work all winter... but extend you early into winter... and allow you to start early into spring.
kylmalava_ikkunat_auki.jpg

I've attached a pic... it's like raised bed gardening... but you don't raise the bed... and add a plexi or glass cover. It opens and vents as required... but keeps the plants sheltered from cold winds, ice, and snow... and keeps the temp a bit warmer within. I've seen some people add 100 watt lightbulbs to them... to warm the air as well. It looks really cool at night... like you've got widows out in your yard.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Yes. Cold Frame is what Im looking at building. Burlap sacks help on colder nights if you are willing to cover. Hay Bales or it appears in the pic the guy used dirt to add insulation on the sides. I have a spot close to my front that would suit it well. Its deer proof (necessary). The climate is mild enough to work well. We do not see temperatures below 15 but very rarely and usually well into February.

I like this set up as it is easy set up, easy maintenance and you can add some needed fresh root veggies(starches) into your winter diet. I actually got the workable veggies and started up the crock pot added some beans this morning to try out for taste. (good excuse)
 

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I have one green house, 12 by 12. I am building another tomorrow. Making it out of used glass sliding doors. Look for people who are getting new windows and doors. They will be happy for you to haul them away. Hook up with window replacement contractors. The old, but very reusable windows are junk to them. Give the greenhouse a southern exposure. I placed 3 black 60 gal. barrels in my 12 X 12. Filled with water they heat up with the sun to about 80 degs. and hold the heat above freezing all night. I just built a solar hot water heater using a glass storm door. It heats water to at least 115 degs. I am connecting it to a 100 gallon livestock trough in the greenhouse as a heat reservoir. I will see how well it holds the heat overnight. If you need a more detailed explaination, get back to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Im in NJ its freezing from NOV to march...Im thinking of a green house...how expensive can it get??
It can be as cheap or expensive as you want to make it. The skills in building your own I think is an added benefit for the extra work. Building your own is cheaper then prefab and you can tailor it to your needs. In this case Google is your friend. I live rural. If I lived in the city I might be more inclined to go prefab depending on space available etc.

On a side note comunity gardens are a great place to get into.

To each there own I guess.
 

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I also live in the Pacific Northwest, only in the High desert. Nome, Alaska has a longer growing season than we do. I do tomatoes in the greenhouse(also made out of sliding glass doors). Root crops and squash and some herbs work . I have tried corn, brocoli, califlower and cucumbers, giving up on those. I know people that have grown these here but have to babysit the garden a lot.Two days ago it was 0 here .
 
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