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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
It's so frustrating to just give codes and have you either call them up or figure it out yourself - why not make things so simple by putting in the dates?

I was going to buy some Heinz pork and beans - Heinz doesn't have the BB date, so I bought Busch's instead (even though I have not tried the product). I'll open one today and try it....if we like it, I'll just be stocking up on Busch's for pork/beans. I'm buying canned goods that don't fall below 2015.

It is easier to manage our stockpile if we plainly see the dates.
Why do some companies don't do as others do?
 

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I've stopped checking the "best used by dates" since historical records show that many canned items survive for decades and are still useable when opened. It's just another scam promoting the purchase of replacement items...
 

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I prefer Buschs too. They are great to combine with rice or pasta as well to produce a sizable group dish out of one can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've stopped checking the "best used by dates" since historical records show that many canned items survive for decades and are still useable when opened. It's just another scam promoting the purchase of replacement items...
Yes, they just had that in the news. The only thing is that I've had out-of-date products (can't recall what), and although they're still edible, you could tell that the quality had deteriorated. If we can, we should strive for the optimum as much as we can since we want to have as much nutrients as we can (especially when we are facing stressful situations).

I try to organize my canned supplies like a store - thus there is rotation of products. A month or so before a product reaches its BB date, we either use it, or donate it to the food bank (that way people who gets it will still have optimum quality/nutrients).
 

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I try to buy the same foods we eat regularly for my first 3 months of stores. I look at the "Best used Date" and add 3 years to it. All my food is packed in covered totes or tubs for easy loading into BOV. As "my" date come up, I put the foods into my regular pantry for use and rebuy what I need. The only item I ever tried that I tossed out was a 4 year old can of coke. Was drinkable in a SHTF situation but barely. The date on the can is for best taste, so you will keep buying the product.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm searching information if Sesame Candies can be frozen. Here's a photo of how they look like...

Waterbridge Sesame Candy, 24 Packs/Box | Staples®

Each individual pack (with 4 flat candies) gives 183 calories, 10 gr fat, 3 gr protein, 2 gr fiber, 2% Daily value Calcium and 6% DV Iron.
It makes a good treat too - we'll need some treats, of course. And eating one pack of this really stave off hunger for quite a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I found this recipe. I'll have to try and freeze it....see how it comes out. Using honey is healthier anyway.

Sesame Snaps

Dairy-Free Egg-Free Gluten-Free Nut-Free
If you can't find roasted sesame seeds, roast your own on a baking sheet in a 350°F (180°C) oven, stirring twice, for 20 minutes.

By Rheanna Kish and the Canadian Living Test Kitchen
Source: Canadian Living Magazine: December 2009

Portion size54 pieces

Ingredients
2 cups (500 mL) granulated sugar
1/3 cup (75 mL) water
1/4 cup (60 mL) liquid honey
1/4 tsp (1 mL) lemon juice
1-1/3 cups (325 mL) roasted sesame seeds
1 pinch salt

Preparation
In heavy saucepan, stir together sugar, water, honey and lemon juice. Bring to boil over medium heat; cook, without stirring but brushing down side of pan with pastry brush dipped in cold water, until dark amber colour and candy thermometer reaches 310°F (155°C), 15 to 20 minutes.

Stir in sesame seeds and salt. Immediately pour onto greased baking sheet, spreading with greased spatula. Using greased knife, score into 32 squares; score each square diagonally in half. Let cool completely; break along score lines into triangles. (Make-ahead: Store in airtight container for up to 1 week.)
Sesame Snaps recipe - Canadian Living
 
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