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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been learning some from one of my sons about the complexities of deciding when to hunker down and when to evacuate.

He and his family live (lived) in Kharkiv, Ukraine. On February 24th, 2022 they had their van packed with essentials and a full tank. (their van ran on both gasoline and propane, so both tanks were topped off.)

Up until the first rockets started to hit their city, they still hoped that Putin was bluffing. He wasn't. The US Embassy had been warning them for days to evacuate. He was reluctant to leave the house he had built with his father-in-law, his chickens and his well stocked freezer and pantry, but still thought he was prepared in case things went bad.

What he didn't anticipate was the unwillingness of two of his older daughters, that still lived with them, to go with them. (one adult and one teenager.)

Even though the first explosions could be heard from their home on the western border of Kharkiv, the older girls were still dragging their feet. (One of them even left her passport at home, causing them to return to retrieve it.) His other two adult daughters (now living on their own) had decided to make their own way out, but were also taking a wait and see attitude even after the missiles were hitting the city.

There were other glitches in their plans. It turned out that their second vehicle, a small car, had not been filled as he had thought. This caused them a delay as they had to wait in a long line to get the car filled before setting out for a safer area.

The good news is that they all eventually made it to safety, including all of his wife's family. The two daughter the were not living at home made it to safety as well, one to South America where she has friends, the other to Germany.

The rest of his family is here in Ohio but still hopeful that they will be able to return home. He has been working with members of his congregation on the relief effort, working with churches in the US to provide support for those who are refugees and those that have moved to relative safety of southern and western Ukraine.

Today he begins his second trip back (family staying here in the US) with special supplies for the relief workers. On his last trip he brought first aid supplies, body armor and helmets, for those that are going into hot zones to evacuate others that has not been able to get out on their own.

Needless to say, we will be constantly praying for him and his friends that he still there as they provide way stations for those trying to get to safety.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
In case anyone is interested, my son had made it back to Poland but the other pastor that he was supposed to go into Ukraine with was delayed and then the airlines lost his baggage. His keys to his van, that they were going to use to go in, were in the lost baggage.

They have my daughter-in-laws little car but would be very tight with the supplies that my son brought from the States.

The news from his home city, Kharkiv, seems to be improving daily but I don't really trust everything I hear from the media, here or there. :(

It would be wonderful for it all to be true and they could return to their home. It has been a real roller coaster ride.
 
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