Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I live in the middle of NC. When shtf where do I go? Stay home? Go to the coast where I have a house or to the mountains where I have nothing or know no one. I have just started prepping, got a nice to me bag (camelback bfg 500). Should all family members have their own bag? Should there be a separate med kit bag? What do I start putting in my bag. Do I need to get a bag for hygiene for myself and the kids and another for the wife? It seems to be overwhelming if I start thinking about all the variables that matter. How long did it take for you guys and gals to get your bag(s) together? Where do you get the products to put into the bag?
 

·
Senior Member R.I.P.
Joined
·
2,886 Posts
No matter the age, each family member should have their own bob. Each bob should have its own personal hygiene stuff & each should have a mini first aid kit. Then a larger trama kit for the entire family.
Alot of stuff for the bob you can get at a dollar store.
 

·
Mod Squad
Joined
·
2,260 Posts
Yeah, I agree you should each have your own BOB, and know how to use what's inside of it. You might get split up somehow, and you all need to be able to go it alone if need be.

I'm not a big fan of bugging out in most situations, but there are times (floods, tornadoes, earthquakes, etc) where it might be the best option. You should probably start with bags that could get you through 72 hours and add from there. Most of what I'm gonna say here assumes you are bugging out...

Your number one need will be water. Since water is so critical, it's probably wise to build a little redundancy into your water preps. My BOB contains a LifeStraw portable filter, 2 uninsulated stainless steel water bottles that I can use to boil water, a small stainless steel cup that can be used to cook in, a hydration bladder, and a small bottle of purification tabs. The hydration bladder can also be used as a pillow or I can blow it up and use it as a flotation device.

It's probably a good idea to carry at least 3 days worth of rations. High calorie energy bars are good, as are any high calorie foods that you don't have to cook. If you're on the move, fires can get you spotted in a hurry: build them small, use them fast, then move to a different location. You should have a few ways to make fire. I carry a ferro rod, 2 BIC lighters, 2 tea candles, and some waterproof matches.

You should also have some form of shelter. If you each have a 5x7 silicone-nylon tarp and a mylar "space blanket" you could probably survive, but this depends on your local climate and the time of the year. You will also need some form of cordage. Though most seem to favor 550 paracord, I usually carry some tarred #18 bank line, which has a 160 pound test strength. This stuff is useful for a lot of things, and will be needed to set up your tarp. A lot of preppers seem to favor tents, but this puts all your eggs into one basket and is heavier and bulkier.

I carry a 5x7 tarp, a 10x10 tarp for myself and my GF, a sleeping bag & ground pad, and a lightweight bug bivy, but would probably dump some of it if bugging out on foot.

You should each have some sort of knife. I carry a big fixed blade "survival" knife (a Schrade SCHF9) that I can use for chopping, digging, and heavy cutting. I also pack a small Leatherman tool, which has smaller blades for skinning small game or finer-type work. I'm looking to add a small dedicated skinning knife.

I would also suggest some way to obtain food from the environment. A pocket-sized field guide to edible plants is a good start. Wire snares and a small fishing kit are also good to have. A dependable .22 rifle like a Ruger 10/22 will allow you to take small game and could be used in defense if all else fails, but guns make noise and noise attracts attention. Most of my guns are for home defense, but if I were to bug out I would carry a 10/22 with 2 x 25 round magazines and 300 rounds of additional ammo, and probably also pack my .45 caliber 1911, 3 x 8 round mags, and 50 extra rounds.

A small basic first aid kit for each member makes sense. Mine includes a "pharmacy" kit, with basic pain killers (aspirin, ibuprofen, etc) anti diarrhea pills, sports cream, neosporin, and a few other over-the-counter meds. I also carry elastic bandages, Quikclot, various tapes, gauze pads, an Israeli bandage, and a few other odds and ends.

A small hygiene kit with a washcloth, soap, toothpaste and toothbrush, and toilet paper is a must.

I also pack an extra set of clothes in a waterproof bag, along with a set of microfleece long johns and a lightweight wind breaker.

I carry far less than most. Carrying a heavy load is a miserable thing, and you will burn more calories. I would rather do without most comfort items and travel faster. To me, lightness is my major comfort item.

The number one thing you need to have are the skills and knowledge. There is no substitute for getting out there and actually doing it.
 

·
Senior Member R.I.P.
Joined
·
2,886 Posts
What needs to go into a BOB depends on how long it will take you to get from point A to point B & what supplies you have at point B. Also the season will make a difference as would terrain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,655 Posts
All good posts in answer. The contents of those bags does very much need to depend on your environment and dealing with it. Everyone should have their own. Not only if you get separated but to disperse the load. One person can't carry food and supplies for two, much less for four or more. If you have to revert to your BOB, than your living out of your bag and every meal you bring is another meal you'll eat. Anyone not carrying their weight is nothing but a burden. It will be a hard reality, but you'll have to deal with it. I've assembled mine over time and reevaluated it over and over like others. We all do and need to, to make sure we have what will serve us best in use and weight carried.

One major thing that hasn't been mentioned yet is the clothes and shoes each of you will be wearing. You could have the greatest BOB in the world and walk out with dress shoes on and die 5 miles down the road because your feet were killing you, your wore out and slipped and broke your ankle. You'd have to wait while it healed and that could drag everyone around you down with you trying to survive while you were immobilized. You or someone else could die of hypothermia because of lack of proper clothing and protection when the temperature drops. Good durable and protective clothing and footwear are every bit as important as a good BOB.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys, this is very good for starting out. I am sure I will be back with more questions. Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I have purchased
Ak 47-2500 rds
SW AR-15/22- 3500 rds
Springfield XD .45-500 rds
FNH-FNX- .45
SW Model 58-41magnum-100 rds
Ruger single six 22lr and magnum no magnum rds but 1500 rds subsonic
Stevens 320 12 gauge with 100 rds
Rock River Ar with 100 rds. Just got it so working on ammo in this tuff economy.
300 feet of para cord
Band aids 600
Med tape 100 ft
Fire starter
Wool socks
Boots broken in already
Gerber lmf knife has sheath with built in sharpener
Cold steel push knife 3.5 inches
2 tarps


This is what I have thus far.....I know it needs help but your suggestions will go a long way to making sure things are done before SHTF, if it is not too late already.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,028 Posts
I live in the middle of NC. When shtf where do I go? Stay home? Go to the coast where I have a house or to the mountains where I have nothing or know no one. I have just started prepping, got a nice to me bag (camelback bfg 500). Should all family members have their own bag? Should there be a separate med kit bag? What do I start putting in my bag. Do I need to get a bag for hygiene for myself and the kids and another for the wife? It seems to be overwhelming if I start thinking about all the variables that matter. How long did it take for you guys and gals to get your bag(s) together? Where do you get the products to put into the bag?
The fact is you can't prepare for everything that could happen. Start out meeting your basic needs to survive at all and go from there.

You live in an AWESOME state for camping / hiking / hunting trips, especially this time of year. I can't count how many times I bought "The coolest survival tool I've ever seen!!!", took it out and actually used it a time or two and found out either it was completely impractical, or something else much simpler was far better. IMO the only way to learn whats REALLY going to work for YOU, and meet YOUR needs, is to get out there and put the stuff to the test.

When asked what survival gear they needed to make it alone in the woods for three days most survivalists come up with a list a mile long that'd take four people to carry! In reality, you might be happiest with a case of bottled water, a lawn chair, box of Snicker bars, and a good book! :D

Let your upcoming experiences from the trips I mentioned teach you what fits you best.

JMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,258 Posts
Woah there, Killer.

You are buying a lot of stuff and all you've really said is that you live in middle Tenn.

Why are you prepping? What do you have at your present location? What are the down sides of it? What are the upsides of another location, as well as the downsides?

What is your background? Are you buying a lot of weapons and ammo with no training? Band aids. Are they different sizes?

You see where I am going with this.

Figure out your threats. Look at your strengths and weaknesses, both in knowledge and in location. Develop a plan. If you plan on relocating, start from the end scenario and work backward so that you'll better list what you need and the time it takes to make it happen.

Yippee! Isn't this a lot of fun?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
You're off to a good start with the defensive stuff, but what you should be looking to improve involves 3 key areas: Shelter. Food Procurement. Water procurement. Water procurement is where I would go next; being able to obtain water, purify it and transport it. Not having safe drinking water is what will drag you down the quickest. As they taught me in USAF Survival Training: 15% dehydrated will reduce muscle strength by 40% and mental capacity by 30%.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top