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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been canning for about 5 years. I read the blue book, and several websites about canning and the consensus was that canned food (home canned) was only good for 1 year and not to keep canned goods longer than that. Everything I read also said that any sauces or soups that you can had to be from a specific recipe that was proven safe for canning.

So, I only preserve things from our garden and stick to jam and jelly recipes. Oh and we love pickling lol.

My question is this... I see people recommending canning on this site and have seen it said that canned food could last ip to 20 years. I also see people saying that they have canned their own sauces that they created. Am I overly cautious or did I miss something? I am vurious because if I am wrong it would open the door to so many more things.
 

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Under ideal conditions canned goods will keep for years, but the 20 year storage life is for dry goods with oxygen absorbers.

It is the same with frozen meats where the "manual" says to eat everything in the first 6 months but after 4 years the meat is still edible and tasty and after 7 years you can trim off the freezer burn and make good stew.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I understand what you are saying, however is there a source somewhere that backs that up? I dont want to get sick from eating something bad. You read about botulism and how there is no sign that a canned good has it there is no smell or discoloration. You eat it and 3 days later you spiral into paralysis. I am going to be honest it scares the bejezzus out of me lol. BUT I also understand on the other hand the people publishing books also dont want to get sued and they may be putting the 1 year limit on canned food on the off chance that 1 in 1000000000 that someone could get sick and sue them.
 

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Canned food that is "double processed" retains its nutritional value for about a year. After that the color and nutritional value degrades. I don't precook my canned goods - they cook during the canning process. I have eaten meat that I canned that was "forgotten" for three years and it was as tasty as the stuff I cooked the night before. As long as it doesn't freeze and the vacuum holds your canned goods (pressure canning) will keep for a very long time. I also do not use "oxygen absorbers" for my dry goods. I vacuum can them and they will keep that way for longer than your mylar bags will last.
 

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Hey Paul, how do you keep the light away from your canned foods to prevent ultraviolet light degradation? Just blacked out storage or???

While I understand that glass jars will do the job for storing your dry goods, people in earthquake prone areas might want to think about mylar bags with oxygen absorbers because they are less likely to break open if the bounce off the shelves. I think we debated this on another thread. Each has its advantages. Each has to weigh those advantage and choose.
 

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We have a rather large pantry but you can easily store canned goods in boxes under beds. The boxes have corrugated separators that keep the jars from hitting each other. Closets are another good place for storage if you have the room. On the floor is the safest place but you can use shelving (like in our pantry) as long as it is secured to the wall studs and have a "locking bar" that keeps them on the shelf. Our entire home is earthquake "proofed". All the tall items (like our many book cases and the china hutch) are anchored to the studs. Heavy items (like the TV that is not used and the computers) are anchored using commercial grade Velcro fasteners. The shelves in the pantry have a 3/4" lip and a 1 x 2 bar that locks in place to keep things on the shelves. The kitchen cupboards have "child safe" locks on the doors to keep them closed if we get a shaker big enough to rattle things around. This is a carry over from living in Seattle and the historic quakes in this area have never done any damage but it is an "earthquake" zone even if the danger is low.

When building my out buildings I superseded all the required codes for wind and earthquake by at least 50%. It's all part of being "prepared".
 
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I understand what you are saying, however is there a source somewhere that backs that up? I dont want to get sick from eating something bad. You read about botulism and how there is no sign that a canned good has it there is no smell or discoloration. You eat it and 3 days later you spiral into paralysis. I am going to be honest it scares the bejezzus out of me lol. BUT I also understand on the other hand the people publishing books also dont want to get sued and they may be putting the 1 year limit on canned food on the off chance that 1 in 1000000000 that someone could get sick and sue them.
No body can tell you what is going to be the right thing to do for you but I will tell you that I have been a "canner" for my whole life. started learning at my grandma's knee when I was very very young. some of my earliest memories are of the canning tools and enamel pans that she used most of her life and I inherited when she passed away.
I can tell you that I have food (and I know every one else does too) that is several years old and still taste just as good as fresh canned. The key is the be very clean about every aspect of the processing, pressure can any thing that doesn't have a high enough acid or sugar content and store in a cool dark place.
If you don't follow the basice rules of safe canning it wont matter if it is stored for 3 months, or store for 10 years. you do it wrong you put yourself at risk simple as that. When you open anything it should have a nice release of pressue when breaking the seal. if not, don't eat it.
I personally can pretty much every thing I can get my hands on. (tonight it's coffee creamer). I do all meats including my favs bacon and hotdogs, milk, soups, stew, breads, and butter to name a few along with the normal fruit, veggies, jams and so on.
I would post a picture of my cellar and drive every one insane with jealousy but haven't figure out how to do that here yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sounds like I need to ignore the warnings and researchers. Like I said before, the lawsuits probably forced them to say 1 year is the limit.

FYI the first and only earthquake I was ever in was in Bremerton, Wa just outside of Seattle when I was in the Navy as a hospital corpsman. It was only a 5.0 but it busted the giant glass window overlooking the sound and really made a mess in the medical records room when all the tall shelvees holding the records toppled. Just glad I live back in Florida where hurricanes come with advance warning :)
 

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Yeah, earthquakes don't provide much warning but you should know that since the insurance companies have been keeping records there has never been a single pay out for damages to a wood frame home. Never!

Brick and masonry buildings have been damaged but not a wood framed stick built home - I like a wood home but I also build to way over the specs for earthquake and wind because you just never know what mother nature will throw at you.
 
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