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As a retired paramedic, I really suggest you start by getting a firstaid class under your belt. As has been said,
if you don't know how to use a piece of firstaid gear, you can be more dangerous that the original injury.
Well said and get refresher courses on a regular basis.. Basic First Aid, Wilderness First Aid, CPR to name a few..
 

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This may sound a bit weird but, a lot of the US Military soldiers have added Tampons you their first aid kit. Great for plugging bullet holes and help to stop the bleeding from bullet holes.. Small in size and a half dozen or so won't take up a lot of room. Store them in a pill bottle with a lid on it.

Maxi Pads would work great but, I think that'd be a little difficult to explain that you your platoon sergeant..

Better to be a little embarrassed when your buddies see them in your bag but, they'll be calling for one with a bullet hole in their leg..

A small sewing kit is also a must have for sewing up wounds, clothing, holes in your tent.. Might want to consider using one of those dental floss packets you get from your dentist or at your local box store.. Lot stronger then sewing thread and is minty fresh.
 

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This may sound a bit weird but, a lot of the US Military soldiers have added Tampons you their first aid kit. Great for plugging bullet holes and help to stop the bleeding from bullet holes.. Small in size and a half dozen or so won't take up a lot of room. Store them in a pill bottle with a lid on it.

Maxi Pads would work great but, I think that'd be a little difficult to explain that you your platoon sergeant..
I'd like to see your source for this.
Tampons and maxi pads are not hemostatic agents. They soak up blood, but do not apply pressure nor encourage clotting.
They also have the inherent risk of leaving debris in the wound that won't show up on x-ray, and that can lead to infection if the wound is closed up with foreign material left inside.
Not to mention, they're also not sterile. You're jamming bacteria laden cotton into an open wound for an unknown length of time. It might be better than bleeding out, but if you have better alternatives that are sterile, actually intended to stop bleeding, and won't get missed on x-ray, go with those.
Celox and/or Quikclot should be chosen. Not Kotex.

If you get a nose bleed, shove whatever you have up there.
Tampons and pads should be left to serve their intended purpose.
 

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I'd like to see your source for this.
Tampons and maxi pads are not hemostatic agents. They soak up blood, but do not apply pressure nor encourage clotting.
They also have the inherent risk of leaving debris in the wound that won't show up on x-ray, and that can lead to infection if the wound is closed up with foreign material left inside.
Not to mention, they're also not sterile. You're jamming bacteria laden cotton into an open wound for an unknown length of time. It might be better than bleeding out, but if you have better alternatives that are sterile, actually intended to stop bleeding, and won't get missed on x-ray, go with those.
Celox and/or Quikclot should be chosen. Not Kotex.

If you get a nose bleed, shove whatever you have up there.
Tampons and pads should be left to serve their intended purpose.
I pack the pads in my kit because of how absorbent they are. I also have large sterile gauze pads and compressed gauze which would go on a wound first.

Given the intended purpose of tampons I can't imagine they would cause many problems if used to plug up a wound.

Cotton balls (along with many other things used in hospital's) are not sterile. A lot of first aid stuff is not actually sterile.

I would imagine they would still be better to use in an emergency than someone's handkerchief that they've been carrying around in their pocket for who knows how long.

I will look into this though.

 

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I pack the pads in my kit because of how absorbent they are. I also have large sterile gauze pads and compressed gauze which would go on a wound first.

Given the intended purpose of tampons I can't imagine they would cause many problems if used to plug up a wound.

Cotton balls (along with many other things used in hospital's) are not sterile. A lot of first aid stuff is not actually sterile.

I would imagine they would still be better to use in an emergency than someone's handkerchief that they've been carrying around in their pocket for who knows how long.

I will look into this though.

Cotton balls, like tampons, are designed to absorb blood for removal. They are not designed to promote clotting and the stopping of hemorrhage.
For that, you need pressure. Which is why all gauze applications require the application of pressure to stop the bleeding. Hemostatic agents can do this as well, but usually don't require direct pressure.
When cotton balls are used in hospitals, the attending surgeons know to irrigate, find, and remove all traces because they put it in there. If you plug up somebody's hole with a tampon and they get whisked off to the hospital, they may not know what you've used, and it won't show up on an x-ray.
Given the cheap cost and prevalence of gauze, I would strongly recommend only going with that as an option, and applying the proper pressure to the wound.
Even better, if you can find hydrophobic gauze, you can reduce blood loss even more.

If you really just like the idea of a "bullet shaped" delivery system, like a tampon applicator, go with something more suited to wound care, like this: XStat – RevMedx (they claim it's by prescription only, though)

Bear in mind, I'm not discounting the "emergency use" idea of a tampon in a bullet wound.
I'm questioning the logic of including them in an already assembled and carried IFAK, as described by kl0an.
It just doesn't make sense when you already have better options in the kit.
 

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Cotton balls, like tampons, are designed to absorb blood for removal. They are not designed to promote clotting and the stopping of hemorrhage.
For that, you need pressure. Which is why all gauze applications require the application of pressure to stop the bleeding. Hemostatic agents can do this as well, but usually don't require direct pressure.
When cotton balls are used in hospitals, the attending surgeons know to irrigate, find, and remove all traces because they put it in there. If you plug up somebody's hole with a tampon and they get whisked off to the hospital, they may not know what you've used, and it won't show up on an x-ray.
Given the cheap cost and prevalence of gauze, I would strongly recommend only going with that as an option, and applying the proper pressure to the wound.
Even better, if you can find hydrophobic gauze, you can reduce blood loss even more.

If you really just like the idea of a "bullet shaped" delivery system, like a tampon applicator, go with something more suited to wound care, like this: XStat – RevMedx (they claim it's by prescription only, though)

Bear in mind, I'm not discounting the "emergency use" idea of a tampon in a bullet wound.
I'm questioning the logic of including them in an already assembled and carried IFAK, as described by kl0an.
It just doesn't make sense when you already have better options in the kit.

For the record I don't keep tampons in my kit, I was just stating if there was nothing else suitable in an emergency situation then they would probably be better than other things that might be used. They do usually come individually wrapped which I would think would make them a little safer.

I do however keep pads (also individually) wrapped in my kit for the reasons I already stated.
 
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As a retired paramedic, I really suggest you start by getting a firstaid class under your belt. As has been said,
if you don't know how to use a piece of firstaid gear, you can be more dangerous that the original injury.
Emphatically this!

Most severe injuries are best treated with diesel and a pressure dressing. Put a pressure dressing on anything obviously bleeding and transport (diesel fuelled vehicle) to the nearest trauma center by the most expeditious method.

If you have no training, here's what you put in your trauma bag, in order of utility/sequence/importance:

1)Items to use to make a pressure dressing or hold pressure on a bleeding wound.
2)CPR and basic first aid class.
3) AMBU bag and oral airway, C collars
4) RN/Paramedic/RT training.
5)Glucometer. Sugar.
6)ACLS qualifications.
7) advanced airway management equipment - laryngoscope, ET tubes, cricothyrotomy kit, combitube, LMA
8)ATLS/TNCC qualifications.

And by this point you'll need no further suggestions as you'll be fully competent to select your own items.

Note that the emphasis here is to stabilize and transport to a higher level of care. In a true SHTF environment where this isn't possible, you'll start to include things like sutures, meds, ventilators, ABG machines and other things that are more long term...
 
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