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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have two BOBs, one is a lightweight one for short treks, the other is a little bigger.

The big one is Voodoo Tactical Matrix in Multicam. Love it! Cost me about 130.
The smaller one is a Red Rock outdoor gear brand, cost me about 35 bucks.

Both have worked really well, I just need to focus on getting them stocked and ready to go!!
 

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Right now its me and my duffel bag. I plan on getting an alice pack, but I think that might say "hey, look at me, I have gear", but then again it might say "Hey, mess with me and you'll be part of my gear".
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah I'm indifferent on the way they "advertise" what you have....if an SHTF happens, people are going to take advantage of people whether they have packs on or not. I prefer a camo bag because it blends in a lot better then black. If you are spotted, you are spotted, nobody will be like "oh he has a red bag, he is no threat or has anything of value".....but if they can't see you....they can't do anything at all!
 
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I have one at work, one in my car, and of course one at home. I spend 8+ hours at work so I figure that something could happen and I need the stuff right then and there.

Also, they are plain backpacks. I too, am going to get an alice pack, and also have been thinking about the "here I am" red flag issue.
 

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We don't do the Bug Out Bags....we (wife and kids) do Get Home Bags.

Mine is a wal-mart camo hunting pack. Plenty big enough and has a water bladder.

The wife and kids use regular backpacks, kinda like school booksacks. They stay stored in the trunk, so they're not subject to heavy use. I think we payed around $10 for theirs,....I use mine when hunting also I think i paid around $40,..mine has mollee.

attached pic of mine and theirs.
 

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We all work within 10 miles of home. Living VERY rural, we have no intentions of bugging out. We're sheltering in place (if possible).

I used to commute 2 hours one way to Baton Rouge everyday. A big part of why I took a job closer to home was 1) to get away from the city 2) be closer to home.

It bothered me working that far away from home, especially since I had to cross two major rivers to get home.
 

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Coyote said:
We don't do the Bug Out Bags....we (wife and kids) do Get Home Bags.
I guess the term Bug Out Bag is really what you plan on doing bag. I agree with you with "get home" issue. Mainly we plan on buggin in. My family works within 5 miles of our home as well. We mainly have plain backpack and they are all in the cars.

I love the idea that you put an extra pair of shoes in there. Tonight i'm going to put a pair of shoes, and a change of clothes. Great idea!
 

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survival said:
Coyote said:
We don't do the Bug Out Bags....we (wife and kids) do Get Home Bags.
I guess the term Bug Out Bag is really what you plan on doing bag. I agree with you with "get home" issue. Mainly we plan on buggin in. My family works within 5 miles of our home as well. We mainly have plain backpack and they are all in the cars.

I love the idea that you put an extra pair of shoes in there. Tonight i'm going to put a pair of shoes, and a change of clothes. Great idea!
Well,...Thats my wife's actually. She wears heels most days, so she's got to have something better if she needs to hoof it!

I wear work boots for everything,...lol,...so i'm always good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Nice, I think the term "BOB" is kinda just a gear bag, what you would take with you if you had adverse conditions forced upon you and you had to get to another place.

Get home bags are great, but there is a real threat that if a chemical spill occurred and the gov't ordered a mandatory Evac of the city (if you are in the country it's a lot less of an issue) to where you would have to bug out. All in all they should contain most of the same stuff, food, water, fire kit, emerg blanket, change of clothes in a baggy to keep them dry, and some sort of defense (taser, baton, gun, crowbar, just something).

I like seeing pictures, I really need to tweek my Big bob, and think about my small bob some more, Maybe I'll get ambitious this weekend and get them both taken care of...
 

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acidlittle said:
Nice, I think the term "BOB" is kinda just a gear bag, what you would take with you if you had adverse conditions forced upon you and you had to get to another place.

Get home bags are great, but there is a real threat that if a chemical spill occurred and the gov't ordered a mandatory Evac of the city (if you are in the country it's a lot less of an issue) to where you would have to bug out. All in all they should contain most of the same stuff, food, water, fire kit, emerg blanket, change of clothes in a baggy to keep them dry, and some sort of defense (taser, baton, gun, crowbar, just something).

I like seeing pictures, I really need to tweek my Big bob, and think about my small bob some more, Maybe I'll get ambitious this weekend and get them both taken care of...
all I can say is take a day and wear it. I wear mine when deer hunting,....and i've had to lighten the load considerably. Mind you I'm a stout feller in good shape,...but humping through the woods or a muddy field with even a 20-30lb bag,..and firearm,.....I've done it for a day.......

it's slow going and exhaustive. The heaviest thing in mine now is the three AR magazines and the water. I'm guessing my pack is 30lbs.....

I could shed some more weight,....but its a trade off for how much firepower, food and water I want to have when I'm away.

I did buy some lifestraws,....so I really need to swap out the bottled water for a straw. Problem is....last year we were in a drought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah when it's warmer out I'm going to take a day and hike with one on and see how it goes, see if I need to tighten stuff, make it more silent or even get some more molle items.

I did do a 5hour hike up a mountain last summer with 33lbs of pack weight, but that was with 2 other guys so we split up the community gear.

I love it when I take my BOB out in public with me and people stare....
 

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I have a duffle bag at the house. A backpack in the car and a smaller pack at work. I've made one up for my daughter and one of my son's. They think I'm paranoid. My other son lives in tornado alley so he's prepared anyway. We all have car packs and home packs. My son in -law is in the market for a couple of good guns. Good boy. Maybe I'll get some of mine back. They are all on board with my bug out plan, though.
 

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I have a Kelty Tornado for a long-term (probably won't be coming back) BOB,
a Kelty Yukon 50 for a 72hr (point A to B) BOB
and a CamelBak Rim Runner in my vehicle (get home bag).
The Rim Runner and Yukon are packed as ultra-light packs. The Tornado is a bit of a 'kitchen sink' pack and tops around 40 Lbs.
 

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Wow! After reading all your post I need to rethink my packs. I have 2 as of right now one for me and one for the wife. I would say they are around 60 pounds. I have everything vacuum sealed separate. I about 2 changes of clothes w/extra undies and socks. Around 3-5 days worth of food. A medic pack containing anything from minor to semi-major injuries. Around a gallon of water, 50' rope, gas mask, weapons, fishing gear, maps, flashlight and glowsticks, fire starting materials, sleeping bag, tarp, and one has the tent, toiletry, and other odds and ends. I made both that way in case we get separated. Plus I have a trauma pack. The ideal situation is throw them in the car and haul azz and set up camp somewhere safer. I plan on making smaller packs just waiting on the next gun show in June to get my packs. A guy comes and sells them there at a great price for a good bag. Any input?
 

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RuDown - This may be more input than you're looking for, but the forum is for sharing, so here goes...

BOB’s are very personal and widely subjective. From my perspective, anything over 30lbs is more of a vehicle or relocation bag than BOB. I’ve done quite a bit of thru-hiking over the past 30 years, on the trail for 7 – 10 days. I know that, for my 185lbs/5’ 11” frame, more than 30lbs takes too much of a toll over time. I doubt I could sustain more than 4 days of aggressive travel with a pack that exceeded 35lbs. I also find that I lose a certain amount of balance and agility as my pack(s) exceed 30lbs. I’m not willing to sacrifice those physical attributes in a bug out situation.

I apply a semi-ultra-light mentality when outfitting a BOB… keeping to multi-use essentials and substituting acquired skills for equipment when and wherever possible. I’m drawn to bags that run around 2800 - 3200 cu/in, are narrow, have a ridged frame and as many external pockets as possible. My Yukon 50 is often chosen as a youth pack. It’s narrower than a typical full frame and sets a little higher. The ridged frame works as a shelter support strut and allows me to lash items (like dry kindling, extra karabiners and coiled rope) external to the pack. I’ve used my pack frame as an ad hoc tree stand, wedged between two limbs. It helps that it will also receive a 100oz camelback hydration reservoir. My last criteria is compression straps. Once loaded up, I like to squeeze my packs down so they’re even more narrow and so nothing moves or makes noise. Packs that move on your back or allow the contents to move will affect your balance and over time suck up valuable energy because your body has to continuously adjust to sublte weight shifts. I pack them light at the bottom, heavy at the top and then squish ‘em.
 

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So what suggestions would you give me. When I first packed them I put everything I thought I might need in them. Knowing now that is to much. What do you sacrifice? Do I drop all the med supplies and just keep that in another pack? I plan on mapping multiple exits out of city and have stash spots on the way to restock supplies. So maybe could drop some of the clothing. Any ideas would be great. I can already hear the wife nagging because her pack is to heavy adding to the stress. So I need to take care of this asap. I have had these made up for a year now and was newer at the time to all this.
 

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RuDown,
Without understanding the specific application and intent for your pack, it’s tough to make specific recommendations, but I’m assuming your intent is for the pack to support you for a period of 5 to 10 days while getting clear of the city and the surrounding dense suburbs. A pack intended to support you for an extended period of days or weeks of subsistence living goes beyond a BOB and is really a relocation pack and not typically something that you would carry on your back.

The five highest survival imperatives that your pack(s) need to cover (in order of their life threatening impact) are Exposure, Hydration, Exhaustion, Sanitation and Nutrition. Components that address Exposure and Exhaustion don’t have a duration aspect, but you have to pack most Hydration, Sanitation and Nutrition components for a specific period of time because they are typically consumables or contain consumables (food, fuel, water, TP. Etc).

This is how I pack a typical 5-7 day pack for one person. Some of the equipment has a skill and/or experience aspect to their use.
Clothing: No cotton, no wool or organic fiber. All clothing is made from some blend of nylon, polypropylene and other light-weight, wicking and compressible material. One pair of pants, one pair of shorts, one tee shirt, one long sleeved shirt. As much as possible, the one pair packed has been washed or rinsed recently. If it’s cold, I wear both pair. I address socks and underwear the same way (similar material). Organic fiber is heavy, absorbent, difficult to clean and bulky… too much space and weight (and eventually stinks).

Exposure: I pack a light compressible fleece jacket , a waterproof breathable rain jacket and light fleece gloves. I carry an 8’ x8’ x .006” plastic painter’s tarp w/cords and attachment balls (no tent). I also pack a ‘Space Blanket’.

Exhaustion: My sleeping bag is a 20 deg down mummy in a compression bag. I also carry cake frosting in tubes for quick high-energy bursts or to help maintain core temperature. I stick to a strict 120/12 cycle where I travel for 120 minutes and rest for 12. Your body adapts to patterns and will regulate better with them. You can gauge your exhaustion level against the timed pattern. Be careful of allowing too much rest. If you allow your metabolism to drop too far, your stamina will kind of implode and you’ll be down and severely fatigued for a long time.

Hydration: I pack a PUR Hiker filter w/iodine cartridge… small, light-weight and indispensible. I carry a military belt canteen, a 100oz camelback reservoir and a one quart Nalgene bottle on the pack.

Sanitation: I combine my toiletries and medical supplies in one kit. Nothing too exotic… the essentials and enough specialized items to handle small to moderate wounds. My experience in the field is that shock can be more dangerous and harder to manage than bleeding. I’ve see people collapse, their blood pressure plummet and become non-responsive after a moderate wound on their arm. I feel strongly that you carry what you’ve been trained to use. If that isn’t much, then you should get the training. Then you’ll know precisely what you need for your circumstances and environment.

Nutrition: I use only freeze-dried foods that can be eaten in their own pouch (a pouch and a half per day)… no condiments, oils, spices. I supplement with energy bars. I carry a palm-sized alcohol stove that nests inside one SS pot with a fry pan/cover and 12oz of fuel, but I only use the stove if an open fire is not feasible. I also eat whatever I can find or catch rather than consume my pack food. Other than a knife, my only utensil is a large Lexan spoon.
I carry a Leatherman and a folding razor blade knife with six spare blades, Gobspark firestick, a cigar tube packed with Vaseline coated cotton balls, sun goggles, sun block, compass, plastic trowel, short pencil & paper, nylon ball cap, bug repellent, .357 mag w/assorted cartridges, assorted light rope and rigging gear, necessary maps, matches, occasionally duct tape,etc.

No axes, saws or machetes. No pry bars, shovels or hammers.
This typically brings my pack to about 30lbs. (not counting water weight)
 

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That is very informative and really appreciated. I have few projects to get out of the way and then remake these things. I hope others will read this and take this knowledge as a gift as I do. Thanks
 
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