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What type and brand of oats do you store? And how do you store them?
When I buy the oats, I wait about a month before I re-package them.
This is enough time for bugs' eggs to hatch if the oats are contaminated.
Since these are meant for a very long shelf life, I want to make sure there are no eggs before I re-package.

I stocked up on regular rolled oats - not the quick-cooking kind.
Some are Quaker brand, some are the grocery's signature brand, some from Bulk Barn. I like the large flakes.

I put them in a freezer bag (heavy duty), with some strips of towel paper mixed in (to absorb moisture), let air out.
Then I put it in another freezer bag (also air out).
Label on date packaged, and a few bay leaves (to deter bugs), in between bags.

I put them in dark colored plastic storage boxes with dried herbs like bay leaves strewn in (again, to deter bugs), and some towel paper (for moisture).
Some are stored in tin drum-shaped containers (which came from dog food years ago) with air-tight lids. There is no difference either between the containers. They're in the basement (cool, dark place), a few inches off the floor.

I check them every 8 months or more to see if there is any clumping. Everything looks good. The oldest ones I got which I've been eating these days, are dated 2016.

I would like to re-organize and buy enough to fit one storage box, put the date also outside the storage box.
It makes it easier to know which ones have to be used first. Stackable boxes will give me more space.
Just so the oats don't get too old, I also use them for feeding birds and squirrels during winter time. Having been re-packaged, I don't think they'll accept them at the Food Bank.
 

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I bought bulk rolled oats from a local organic farm, treated them with food grade DE packed it 4lbs to a gallon mylar bag with o2 absorber, same with hard red wheat except 5 lbs. to a gallon bag. DE will kill the bugs and absorb moisture.
 

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I bought bulk rolled oats from a local organic farm, treated them with food grade DE packed it 4lbs to a gallon mylar bag with o2 absorber, same with hard red wheat except 5 lbs. to a gallon bag. DE will kill the bugs and absorb moisture.
Right, but I don't want DE in my food, regardless of whether it's food grade.
 

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Just out of curiosity, may I ask why? You may know something about DE that I'm not aware of.
Harmful to breath is the first thing that comes to mind. Great for my chickens to ingest and for them to breath it no big deal as there life span is only about 8 years. Humans though live long enough it will wreck havoc on your lungs and personally I wouldn't want to ingest it either.
 

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Harmful to breath is the first thing that comes to mind. Humans though live long enough it will wreck havoc on your lungs and personally I wouldn't want to ingest it either.
I took the part out about your chickens, you might be surprised at what chickens will eat. You raise a good point about human lungs, DE miners, like coal miners have a higher than average rate of lung diseases. I wear a mask when I'm using DE. We live in an age where all kinds of dust and toxic chemicals enter our lungs; its a crap shoot out there. Ever smoked or been around a smoker, there's a lung killer for you. Ever lived in a house built prior to the 80's, if yes, you've probably breathed in asbestos.

As for ingesting DE some people use it daily. Whenever I have health issues, and when you lived 70 years who hasn't, I try to do some research about them. My go to sites are the Mayo Clinic and WebMD. Mayo Clinic doesn't address DE. Here's what WebMd has to say:

"When taken by mouth, diatomaceous earth is used as a source of silica, for treating high cholesterol levels, for treating constipation, and for improving the health of skin, nails, teeth, bones, and hair. When applied to the skin or teeth, diatomaceous earth is used to brush teeth or remove unwanted dead skin cells."

charito said: "I put them in a freezer bag (heavy duty), with some strips of towel paper mixed in (to absorb moisture), let air out." Chlorine, a poisonous gas and formaldehyde are used in the manufacture of paper towels. When food is placed on paper towels the food can absorb the chemicals from the paper towels. I wonder how many tons of bacon with all it's nitrites has been placed on paper towels.

I don't know, I'm just an old man tryin to survive.
 

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My understanding is if you put oxygen absorbers in the sealed mylar bag, then that kills any insects. I also add dessicants which I think would help even more.
 

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I took the part out about your chickens, you might be surprised at what chickens will eat. You raise a good point about human lungs, DE miners, like coal miners have a higher than average rate of lung diseases. I wear a mask when I'm using DE. We live in an age where all kinds of dust and toxic chemicals enter our lungs; its a crap shoot out there. Ever smoked or been around a smoker, there's a lung killer for you. Ever lived in a house built prior to the 80's, if yes, you've probably breathed in asbestos.

As for ingesting DE some people use it daily. Whenever I have health issues, and when you lived 70 years who hasn't, I try to do some research about them. My go to sites are the Mayo Clinic and WebMD. Mayo Clinic doesn't address DE. Here's what WebMd has to say:

"When taken by mouth, diatomaceous earth is used as a source of silica, for treating high cholesterol levels, for treating constipation, and for improving the health of skin, nails, teeth, bones, and hair. When applied to the skin or teeth, diatomaceous earth is used to brush teeth or remove unwanted dead skin cells."

"When taken by mouth, diatomaceous earth is used as a source of silica, for treating high cholesterol levels, for treating constipation, and for improving the health of skin, nails, teeth, bones, and hair. When applied to the skin or teeth, diatomaceous earth is used to brush teeth or remove unwanted dead skin cells."
Umm yeah well smoked for 40 years what else is new.... I also have been in the Boiler (read asbestos covered piping) related field for 40 years.

The advise I can offer to you is stay off of web MD and Mayo clinic you'll live longer and worry less. For every disease you look up there you will have at least 3 out of ten symptoms.

With that said I'll pass on ingesting Food grade D.E and being engulfed by the dust cloud. I will use it on my farm animals though without issue.
 

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Just out of curiosity, may I ask why? You may know something about DE that I'm not aware of.
It's just a completely unnecessary additive in your food. It won't hurt you to eat it; I'd just rather not. You said you wear a mask handling it. Are you going wear a mask when you prepare the oats?
 

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DE is good to put around plants to deter slugs/insects. Washes away with rain.

I'd not put it into in my food stores. Although it's claimed food grade is O.K. to ingest. Farmers use it it too: in feed acts as a wormer , chickens/fowl dust in it to get rids of insect parasites ( set up one for the chickens where it won't get rained on), I've seen duster bags hung in barn doors.

For food stores I can get clean food grade 55- gal metal drums, $25 ea. Put sealed stuff inside, no bugs or vermin can get in.

I use them for garbage cans, bear/critter proof so far. And at $25 cheaper and better than store brought metal garbage cans. I get full size plastic liners to line those cans, the HD liners are big enough to hang over the top rim with the lid on.

1 barrel 2.png

1 barrels.png
 

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DE is good to put around plants to deter slugs/insects. Washes away with rain.

I'd not put it into in my food stores. Although it's claimed food grade is O.K. to ingest. Farmers use it it too: in feed acts as a wormer , chickens/fowl dust in it to get rids of insect parasites ( set up one for the chickens where it won't get rained on), I've seen duster bags hung in barn doors.

For food stores I can get clean food grade 55- gal metal drums, $25 ea. Put sealed stuff inside, no bugs or vermin can get in.

I use them for garbage cans, bear/critter proof so far. And at $25 cheaper and better than store brought metal garbage cans. I get full size plastic liners to line those cans, the HD liners are big enough to hang over the top rim with the lid on.

View attachment 107689

View attachment 107691
No bugs can get in, but bugs in grains come from the grains themselves, not the storage vessels. So some kind of precautions need to be taken prior to long-term storage.
 

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No bugs can get in, but bugs in grains come from the grains themselves, not the storage vessels. So some kind of precautions need to be taken prior to long-term storage.
10-4 there.

First would be trusted source. I've had the little insects in my stores but I believe most were not pre-packaged inside, they found the stores. Mostly cereals and oats.
 

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@******* I use oxygen absorbers, I don't completely trust them. The first batch I ever bought and used was already spent, I ended up re-bagging 50 lbs of wheat. But I'm learning. DE is a desiccant and kills insects. But I'm not trying to change any minds here. Just exchanging ideas. Everybody should do what they're comfortable with.
@hawgrider I think you understand my point. I've removed some asbestos too, but not for a living. BTW I ride a softail, on its second rebuild, it goes pretty good.

@ Mad Trapper I envy you and the others guys that have land and livestock and have the room to store in large containers.
@paulag1955 I'll probably, what was I saying, oh yeah, forget to wear a mask until I'm halfway through the pouring the oats out in the colander for rinsing.

Thanks for all your comments, I came here to learn what other folks do and I'm learning. Like all things there may be more than one correct answer.
 

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@******* I use oxygen absorbers, I don't completely trust them. The first batch I ever bought and used was already spent, I ended up re-bagging 50 lbs of wheat. But I'm learning. DE is a desiccant and kills insects. But I'm not trying to change any minds here. Just exchanging ideas. Everybody should do what they're comfortable with.
Technique I learned while putting up thousands of lbs of long term stores, is to leave the lid off the pail for a bit after sealing. If the oxygen absorbers work, which mine all have, the mylar bag will start to contract, just like if you sucked out the air. Generally means I package one day and seal the plastic pail the next. Another technique I do is to seal the bag all the way except for about 2 inches. I then remove the oxygen absorber from its bag, insert into mylar bag, pust out all possible remaining air and then seal. I then run a 2nd bead of seal under the first, just as a precaution. I feel twp seals is better than one.

IMO, once that bag contracts, any bugs or larvae will be dead. Plus as I stated, I also add dessicants which will remove any residual moisture. The pails are stored in a room that always stays cool and the contents are kept dry & in a very low oxygen environment. All I understand tells me that is what is needed to ensure your stores last for decades.
 

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One other thought. If you vacuum seal, how much air/oxygen is left? Do oxygen absorbers really need to used in such a case? Might a vitamin C tablet substitute?

I've not studied oxygen absorbers well. In fact in my storage not used them, no problems so far.. But I'll learn...

I worked with chemicals that would change with a wiff of air /oxygen/moisture, and handled them in inert atmospheres (argon, nitrogen). Also stored those long term.

Some took a year just to make. Sort of like my vegetables!
 

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One other thought. If you vacuum seal, how much air/oxygen is left? Do oxygen absorbers really need to used in such a case?
You know, I come from the school of thought if a 4x4 is good enough... I'll use a 6x6 to be extra sure. Since an oxygen absorber is not very expensive, why not use it even if you vacuum seal? That is why I also add dessicants. Now if you are just storing for a few years, no big deal. But if these need to last decades, I'm gonna use every trick available to ensure that food stays good. Your life just may depend on your actions.
 

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If the oxygen absorbers work, which mine all have, the mylar bag will start to contract, just like if you sucked out the air... I then run a 2nd bead of seal under the first, just as a precaution. I feel twp seals is better than one.
My problem was not paying attention to the fact, that the bag the oxygen absorbers came in was not properly sealed. As many times as I have used a Food Saver, it should have been a red flag. When the bags weren't compressed the next day the light came on. I remember when I first started reloading I didn't check each case to make sure powder had dropped. Ended up with a bullet jammed in my barrel. Ever since I have had a small goose neck light over that station and can see the powder clearly.

I will begin double sealing, I've done it for years with the Food Saver, no reason not to do it with mylar bags.
 

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My problem was not paying attention to the fact, that the bag the oxygen absorbers came in was not properly sealed. As many times as I have used a Food Saver, it should have been a red flag. When the bags weren't compressed the next day the light came on. I remember when I first started reloading I didn't check each case to make sure powder had dropped. Ended up with a bullet jammed in my barrel. Ever since I have had a small goose neck light over that station and can see the powder clearly.

I will begin double sealing, I've done it for years with the Food Saver, no reason not to do it with mylar bags.
I also made sure I got the oxygen absorbers that were individually sealed. Once I opened that pack, I wanted to get the absorber sealed up immediately. Having multiple absorbers in the same package concerned me. Maybe they don't work so fast as to be concerned with then sitting out for a bit, but I don't know. So I choose to get them opened & sealed up within seconds.
 

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You know, I come from the school of thought if a 4x4 is good enough... I'll use a 6x6 to be extra sure. Since an oxygen absorber is not very expensive, why not use it even if you vacuum seal? That is why I also add dessicants. Now if you are just storing for a few years, no big deal. But if these need to last decades, I'm gonna use every trick available to ensure that food stays good. Your life just may depend on your actions.
I don't have stores right now to last decades, or enough years. I need bag material for vac sealers, freezer bags, canning supplies. LOTS more urgent/realistict than O2 absorbers. I'm not storing food to be dug up by zombies 20 years from now, it's not realistic.

If SHTF my stores will be done before anything goes bad in my pantry.

IMHO, rotate stores you have, unless you have a "Banker/politician" bunker to hide in for 5-10 yers......

I just located canning lids, there is a run on canning supplies. Local stores don't have vinegar, I need to check nearby.............O2 absorberers are last on my list
 

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IMHO, rotate stores you have, unless you have a "Banker/politician" bunker to hide in for 5-10 yers......
Oh I do. But remember, I plan on feeding a lot of people. Right now there are only two of us on the farm, and on top of that, my wife is in Memphis 4 days of the week staying with her mom & aunt who are knocking on 100. So I don't go thru much food that can be rotated.
 
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