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I raise rabbits and garden a lot. I think if something happened, I could trade rabbit meat and veggies for other needed goods.

What is your specialty?
 

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Bladesmith with a small machine shop down stairs, 2 forges, home brewer, Mead maker, cheese maker, preserve/smoke meats.

How hard is it to raise rabbits, and what kind?

Thanks
 

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I do a little blacksmithing (looking to get a lot deeper into it), . . . leather work, . . . metal work, . . . electrical, construction, plumbing, HVAC, and I'm pastor of a little country church.

May God bless,
Dwight
 

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I did an anvil works for about 8 years after my first burn out with medicine, but it's been over fifteen yrs since I hammered all day. I have been planning to, after crops are in and farm is running.
I'm medicine, org chemistry, farm and primitive skills. I'd rather be renting jet skis, but if we gotta have boom-boom (dang! Ahahaha!)
 

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Sadly my list starts out expert at breaking other people stuff,
Working on regaining family farming skills, I do know a thing or two about building rail roads.
 
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If I had to pick a specialty it would be metal smith. If you want it made out of metal I can do it. But I can also make leather goods, cook & can, engineer and construct buildings, electronics, drafting, computer programming (hobby programming), sewing from clothes to back-packs, and I am working on wood-working skills. I have no affinity with wood and little patience for things that won't yield to my will - hence the learning curve with wood.
 

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Supurvision. I can tell anyone how to do their job better.
Seriously, thou, I guess it would be "a fixer". I can fix, recycle, repurpase things. My lady says Im a crazy hillbilly, but she sees that there isn't much I cant fix.
 

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Good Skills all, anything you know will be very important. I am a jack of all trades and a master of none, but my experience is broad. My personality is learning as much as I can about a subject but I get bored after I find out most of the skills and so I don't practice them to become an expert. But as a whole I can fix, hunt, count, harvest, debate, worship, earn, dig, fish, sing, and throw horse shoes better than 80% of you hehe.

After the collapse I am honing my skills to be a community organizer, I see that as a challenge that is fun to learn and should be very valuable.
 

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Don't forget that being a community organizer is a step toward the white house. :)
 

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Same here, Jack of all and master of none.. There is not much equipment I can't run. When it comes to farming and ranching, I can hold my own. Hunting and fishing are up there too. Including long range hunting. The one thing I have never really picked up is electrical work. I guess I will have to start learning that now. I have a wide range of stuff I have done over the years from being a commercial scuba diver to locomotive conductor/engineer.. You learn a lot of different stuff that way..lol
 

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Just starting out myself.

I've done glazing, plumbing, electrical, carpentry. I've rebuilt engines, done about every aspect of mechanicals. Never rebuilt transmissions, but I've replaced them, converted from auto to stick, etc.

I see myself as keeping mechanical things going. And being security.

I've also been gardening, and just recently raising chickens. I'm looking for a rabbit or 2. I have a cage, need the rabbits. I'll start off with 2 see how many I get haha.
 

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Just about any kind of construction/ building. Master electrician. Bushcraft, fishing, hunting, farming.
 

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Automatic transmissions are easy to rebuild - complex but easy work. The manual transmissions are simpler but they're hard work. Most things having to do with vehicles I have done for a living. Having been a mechanic for 43 years (even had my own shop) you get to do all kinds of work. (I even deigned a complete engine when I was 14) Plumbing repairs and complete home wiring are easy for me. I designed and built my two out buildings and one of them has more wiring circuits than most homes. I haven't learned to engineer a full plumbing job yet and it's not high on the list of things to do either.
 

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Woodworking has been my passion for the last 20 or so years. I made all of the cabinetry and about half of the furniture in our current house. I can hold my own doing sheet metal work. I put myself through college working in a machine shop and towards the end, I was getting pretty good with an old WWII era Bridgeport mill. I have not touched one since (that was over 25 years ago), so I do not know if I still have that skill or not. I will eventually find out as I plan to build out a hobbyist metal shop in the next few years.

Beyond that, I make some pretty awesome sausage and am a better than average pit master.
 
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Inor, anyone who can work with wood has my admiration. My brother can do fantastic things with wood but I am better at making sawdust than anything else. I am in the process of learning that you have to build to suit the wood that you are working with. It is hard for me to let the wood tell me what it will do. That is why I do so well with metal - you can put it any way you want it to go and it stays there. You can also actually use tolerances when working with steel - unlike wood that will grow, twist, cup and bend to suit itself no matter what you do.

Anyway, my hat is off to you!
 

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Inor, anyone who can work with wood has my admiration. My brother can do fantastic things with wood but I am better at making sawdust than anything else. I am in the process of learning that you have to build to suit the wood that you are working with. It is hard for me to let the wood tell me what it will do. That is why I do so well with metal - you can put it any way you want it to go and it stays there. You can also actually use tolerances when working with steel - unlike wood that will grow, twist, cup and bend to suit itself no matter what you do.

Anyway, my hat is off to you!
HAHAHA! Yes - it can be frustrating at times. :) If you are just getting started and trying to get a sense of joinery, starting off working with Baltic Birch plywood is a good way to go. It is very stable and mostly stays the size you cut it. Once you get used to planning 5-6 cuts ahead of where you are working, then switch over to hardwood.
 

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primary skill.... electrical, from generation, to fixing that little radio, I can hold my own

spent a lot of years in 10 pin bowling, and fixing "s#%t with s#%t" is sort of a art form

do have other secondary skills..
 

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Currently doing maintenance work in a factory, but have the skills most folks who call themselves men, should have.:) Except woodworking, I know, measure twice cut once, I cut it twice and its still too short.:)
 
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