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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a firm believer in prepping with food you like to eat. When SHTF occurs
and you have to live off your preps its going to be a stressful time and a
serious change of diet will make it worse. So I want to eat, routinely, what
I'd have to eat. The three things I currently enjoy and have plenty of in
supply are:

Lentils, rice and carrots. Lentils and Rice I don't imagine growing so I have
to have them stocked and do pretty well. I use the oldest of my stocks
each year - even if it means digging up some I got burried. I can't just
store it at my BOL becuase it would walk away - if I want something to be
there I have to burry it.

Carrots I can grow winter, summer, no matter what it seems and both at
my BOL and home. I plant some about every 15 days and always have
a fresh supply comming up. I've yet to have critters get to a crop or
lose a crop for weather or other concerns. Now mind you I haven't tried
growing them in Nov/Jan at the BOL yet. I have my doubts as we freeze
up pretty good. Though I'm thinking the extra barrels and buckets might
work for them and am trying that out now on patatos.

I've bought dehydrated foods, mostly greens and simply don't like them.
They'd beat starvation no doubt, but its not what I want. Generally canned
green beans and other greens are ok, better then deyhdrated but a short
shelf life - 2 years I believe - and very salty.

Any other options?
 

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I like to eat what I have stored which is rice, beans, sugar, oats, lard, flour, raisins and peanut butter. I have some other stuff like Spam, canned chicken and canned vegetables to add variety. I don't think it would bother me much to change over from what I am eathing now. Alot of this stuff I like but don't eat it much because it is high in calories and I don't need to get any fatter.
 

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Peanut butter and honey. PB has a shelf life of a couple years, some people say as short as a year to 1.5, but I've seen and eaten 2+ years old if properly stored. I eat a TON of B so I don't have to worry about rotation.

Honey will keep forever, worst case it crystallizes and you heat it to soften it up.

I keep at least 6 (usually closer to 10-12 though) big jars of PB on hand at all times. Honey varies greatly depending on how big of a bulk purchase I can get from the local supplier.
 

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I had soup and sandwiches for lunch today.
I ground some wheat for flour to make the sourdough bread, sprouted some wheat for sprouts on my chicken sandwich which had home made mayo, and the soup was left over beef roast, potatoes, peas and carrots.

I like a lot of things and keep my diet as diversified as I can while storing and growing as much of it as I can.
 

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Beef jerky and hard salami are my favorites.

Just be sure to have some dental floss handy....
 

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I'm planning to bug in till it is no longer safe. I live on the edge of town so . . . I've been saving chunky soup. One can is almost enough now per day. I know I'll be more active after SHTF but for now it works it works for me. For bugging out I'll probably be on foot, canned food will be way to heavy so right now the only thing I have is oat meal. I plan to get those freeze dried foods that are supposed to be good for 10 years but because i don't have a basement, I don't know how long they will last.
 

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Cream of mushroom soup

Pour It over a magpie, bake at 350 for 30 minutes and serve.

Add rice to the gravy as desired,.

Any meat product can be substituted for magpie, and you can use cream of chicken soup as well

Seriously try it
 

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Cream of mushroom soup

Pour It over a magpie, bake at 350 for 30 minutes and serve.

Add rice to the gravy as desired,.

Any meat product can be substituted for magpie, and you can use cream of chicken soup as well

Seriously try it
Good God man! I grew up in Minnesota! We ate Campbell's Cream of Mushroom soup over EVERYTHING growing up - including freakin' breakfast cereal! If I NEVER see another can of Cream of Mushroom soup again it will be too soon! :-D

I agree with my wife: anything that is canned, stuffed, smoked, herded, harvested, grown, or ground at home.
 

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For me, it would be beans and rice, both are easy to store, a good start for a good meal, and will be able to fill an empty belly when the time comes that not being hungry is more important that something nice to eat.
 

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Cream of mushroom soup

Pour It over a magpie, bake at 350 for 30 minutes and serve.

Add rice to the gravy as desired,.

Any meat product can be substituted for magpie, and you can use cream of chicken soup as well

Seriously try it
For me, it would be beans and rice, both are easy to store, a good start for a good meal, and will be able to fill an empty belly when the time comes that not being hungry is more important that something nice to eat.
Cream of mushroom soup over rice is nectar of the Gods
 

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As a more serious update to my previous post...

Travelling for business as much as I do, I keep a mini-BOB in my suitcase. One of the things I always carry is a minimum of 10,000 calories of edibles. For the last few years that has been several First Strike brand energy bars. (I got a really good deal on a bunch of them about 5 years ago.) The apple-cinnamon flavor are not too bad; the chocolate flavor are tolerable.

Anyway, Mrs Inor vacuum sealed a bunch of them into a pouch that I just kept in my suitcase in case of emergency. After riding with me for about 3 years, I got to wondering what the temperature extremes of flight might have done to them. (Flying at 30,000+ feet I am guessing the cargo hold gets to temps in the -30 to -40 range and on the tarmac at Sky Harbor (Phoenix) the cargo hold has to be at least 130 degrees. So, last night I cut the package open and ate one. It was not quite the crisp rectangular shape they were originally, but if you used your imagination you could see that it once was a rectangle. Beyond that, it tasted fine (or at least as fine as it did when I first put it into my bag) and retained the original texture. All in all, I am pretty impressed with them.

As I said, this bunch is about 5 years old or maybe more. So I think I will start eating them and replacing them with new ones. But they seem to stand up to the rigors of travel and temperature extremes well.
 
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Anything I can find at the time. Sure stockpiles are nice, they eventually deplete, sometimes you lose a harvest, or whatever happens, well, be prepared to eat even the shit you can't stand. So it is all my favourite cause if I get picky, I'm dead in my mind.
 

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A big juicy steak on the grill.

That is not tongue in cheek. The multiple times my wife and I have to live off-grid, that was normal fare.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
5 + years is pretty good for an energy bar - I would have thought 2 years max on them.

As a more serious update to my previous post...

Travelling for business as much as I do, I keep a mini-BOB in my suitcase. One of the things I always carry is a minimum of 10,000 calories of edibles. For the last few years that has been several First Strike brand energy bars. (I got a really good deal on a bunch of them about 5 years ago.) The apple-cinnamon flavor are not too bad; the chocolate flavor are tolerable.

Anyway, Mrs Inor vacuum sealed a bunch of them into a pouch that I just kept in my suitcase in case of emergency. After riding with me for about 3 years, I got to wondering what the temperature extremes of flight might have done to them. (Flying at 30,000+ feet I am guessing the cargo hold gets to temps in the -30 to -40 range and on the tarmac at Sky Harbor (Phoenix) the cargo hold has to be at least 130 degrees. So, last night I cut the package open and ate one. It was not quite the crisp rectangular shape they were originally, but if you used your imagination you could see that it once was a rectangle. Beyond that, it tasted fine (or at least as fine as it did when I first put it into my bag) and retained the original texture. All in all, I am pretty impressed with them.

As I said, this bunch is about 5 years old or maybe more. So I think I will start eating them and replacing them with new ones. But they seem to stand up to the rigors of travel and temperature extremes well.
 

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As a more serious update to my previous post...

Travelling for business as much as I do, I keep a mini-BOB in my suitcase. One of the things I always carry is a minimum of 10,000 calories of edibles. For the last few years that has been several First Strike brand energy bars. (I got a really good deal on a bunch of them about 5 years ago.) The apple-cinnamon flavor are not too bad; the chocolate flavor are tolerable.

Anyway, Mrs Inor vacuum sealed a bunch of them into a pouch that I just kept in my suitcase in case of emergency. After riding with me for about 3 years, I got to wondering what the temperature extremes of flight might have done to them. (Flying at 30,000+ feet I am guessing the cargo hold gets to temps in the -30 to -40 range and on the tarmac at Sky Harbor (Phoenix) the cargo hold has to be at least 130 degrees. So, last night I cut the package open and ate one. It was not quite the crisp rectangular shape they were originally, but if you used your imagination you could see that it once was a rectangle. Beyond that, it tasted fine (or at least as fine as it did when I first put it into my bag) and retained the original texture. All in all, I am pretty impressed with them.

As I said, this bunch is about 5 years old or maybe more. So I think I will start eating them and replacing them with new ones. But they seem to stand up to the rigors of travel and temperature extremes well.
I'm not an expert but my understanding is the cargo hold is pressurized and climate controlled like the cabins.
 

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It all depends on where I get to bug out to! If i can go to the ocean its going to be a fish diet, fish jerk, seaweed, brown rice, and beans, my biggest food prep for the ocean is spices and seasonings! On the other hand if I have to go to the hole in wall it will be local game backed up by the tons of heart healthy freeze dried food! I have many cases of the ER rations if things get to bad. I will be bugging in for a while though at first which will consist of the canned food and regular stock grocery items!
 
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