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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Water obviously comes from faucets and pipes..... right? "NORMAL" isn't what prepping is about. Everyone here knows that one of the absolute requirements for life is a constant supply of drinking water yet we spend money and time preparing all of the other items for times that aren't "normal" but have taken water for granted for so long that it is often not really considered while prepping for emergencies.

I have spent most of my adult life earning a living by finding and developing water supplies for the brave souls who venture away from the "Pipes" and town to have their own, independent life in rural areas. I am constantly reminded of our general lack of appreciation for a good supply of drinking water until we can't connect to the public pipes. Suddenly we realize that we have no idea how and from where drinking water is gotten for our house! It is startling. Now what? The questions have never even occurred to most folks.

People with wells have invested a lot of money answering the questions. They have drilled a well and installed a good electric submersible pump system..... and after a year or so, go back to thinking water comes from their faucets.... naturally :D It DOES when the power is on.

Customers have asked me for a hand pump that can be installed permanently on their well, with the main system in the well, ever since I entered the industry in 1973 and my answer was "there aren't any that will fit with the submersible system in place. They won't fit." A few years ago some pumps appeared that would and most of them work well within limitations. Some required professional help to install because of the weight. Some are obviously built for temporary use only. We were pleased to see them appear but realized that there were aspects we could address to make the investment more worthwhile.

As a professional, I would require my emergency pump to be as simple in function and ease of installation as possible while providing a solid water supply with enough pressure to energize my house pressure system if needed. I would want the exposed pump handle structure to be solidly mounted and weather and freeze protected. I would want the materials used to meet all NSF standards for potable water. I want rugged, simple quality for my money. I use my own requirements for anything I recommend to a customer.

I couldn't find a hand pump that satisfied my requirements so I teamed with a partner who, as a pump company specialist and machinist, I could team with to build one to our specifications. It proved to be a challenge that took all Summer and Fall but we designed and built the Storm Pump that I introduced in another thread here earlier. We have shipped our first units to Alaska and accept all major credit cards through PayPal as well as checks, etc. I invite anyone interested to visit our website Storm Pump Emergency manual backup hand pump for your deep well , follow the links for details, and call or email me to ask questions.

[email protected]
208-277-7416 (free anywhere on Skype)
 

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I live right next to one of the largest fresh water lakes in Northern Europe, theres a bunch of wells and underground watersources aswwell. But water is everything, without it we have nothing, and we would be nothing.
 

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Responding to Lucky Jim's question: I lived in Northern Michigan for 15 years and we had a 4" well that was 180' deep. Winters lasted almost 6 months. It was in the "snow belt" and we got about 200" of snowfall each year. We could expect at least one blizzard. Temperature wise I've seen 35 below zero. Nothing froze.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Drilled wells and their "plumbing" usually include a "pitless adaptor" which connects the pump pipe to the water line below the frost level. Older wells, with above ground pump houses require heat to keep the plumbing from freezing. The well never freezes but in some cases, if the water line isn't protected, the plumbing can. The Storm Pump is designed so that any standing water in the system drains back down the well to below the frost level. It will not freeze.
 

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Very important - I buy a case or two of water a week for my prep closet. I also have several large fish tanks, which can be cleaned and made into clean water. Also a lot of people forget about the toilets and water heater. Most toilets have 2-3 gallons. Water heaters are anywhere form 40 to 100 gallons. Even without my bottle water storage - these all give me 250 gallons of ready to drink water. 3 gallons a day in usage for me - that lasts me 2-3 months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Bennett, you're right on each of your points. Our pump is for a source of water even when the power stays out. If you don't have a well, save all the water you can store and hope for a short crisis.
 

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This looks nice, but little to NO information of solution in your website

Bennett, you're right on each of your points. Our pump is for a source of water even when the power stays out. If you don't have a well, save all the water you can store and hope for a short crisis.
This looks nice, but little to NO information of solution in your website -- Just a picture and some very basic questions answered with NO detail - I checked and there are WAAYYYY to many questions to be asked on how it will fit and be used -- ESPECIALLY for a hand pump that will cost ~$2000 (WAYYYY more than the big heavy duty electric pump I already have installed).

You REALLY need to do a lot of work, in most cases I would just delete your site and click off your link, but I am giving you the benefit of the doubt. But so many unanswered questions. How or does it tie into the existing plumbing from well to house? (Below the pitless ? How?) or does it require all new plumbing back into house (and requisite burial below frost line) How does it attach to well cap ?... Do I have to run a whole other pipe in parallel to the existing well pipe that is down for the existing electric pump (will it even fit in my 4" well hole??) etc etc - (hundreds more questions)

I think a DETAILED schematic how this all works and goes together in common electric well pump situations is seriously required.
 

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As a matter of interest, do wells freeze solid in winter? What do we do then?
No some wells called artisan wells around here flow out of the ground and the water may run most of the winter .
The water comes out of the ground around 55 degrees from them.
Even when it is 20 below go down 5 feet there is no frost. The frost line here goes from around 2 feet to 4 feet depending on snow cover and how long winter goes.
Water is the one resource we will never run out of here. Sand point wells can be put in with ease.
 

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String and a bucket down the well casing. What's the big deal?? Has worked for hundreds of years. Remember Keep It Simple Stupid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
First to tSenator, we invite questions by phone, email, or in the chatroll. I think you might have missed the info/specs link. Sorry you didn't find answers to your "hundreds" of questions on our website and we will add more pictures as we go. Yes this system is separate and in addition to your main electric pump system. It is to be mounted permanently on the well seal we provide. Yes we have installed our pipe inside a 4" well liner that had the 1 1/2" galvanized drop pipe to the electric submersible system in place. It went in easily. The Storm Pump is independent of power supplies. It can be modified to operate on a variety of motors and mechanical apparati if required. If you want to permanently pipe it into the house that can also be done. Can I answer every variation in a simple sentence, no. The FAQs you referenced are simply that, Frequently Asked Questions. Your turn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Good luck using the bucket and rope method without removing the electric pump first. If your drilled well has no pump in it your method has worked in hand dug wells for years. It takes a very special "bucket" to fit in most 4"-10" drilled wells and still get water in the bucket and back out efficiently. Different strokes for different folks. We present this Storm Pump for those who want a good quality, permanent, weatherproof, pump that will produce water under pressure from a well with the existing main system still in place.
 

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I think you might have missed the info/specs link. Sorry you didn't find answers to your "hundreds" of questions on our website ........ Your turn.
Thanks for those details, and I guess I don't have exactly hundreds of questions but I did read the FAQs & Info Specs link and it left a lot to be desired -- its right here - stormpump.com and its a couple of paragraphs and more of a marketing pitch than a detailed engineering installation example/guide -- I am very technical and its severly lacking -- Pictures and video's will be worth a THOUSAND words so that will help a lot.

And I did learn some things just now that you don't have on the website so thank you for that

And here is a big question - where does the water leave the well from ? Will this require another pitless adaptor in addition to the one thats already there for the outlet the electric pump -- how is that going to work ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
We have an installation video in production. Hopefully it will be on the site soon. I invite you to ask any questions on the "ask us a question" link so we can add your questions to the FAQs or at least answer them all. A phone call with or without Skype is also much easier for detailed individual questions that are hard to answer in a generic presentation on a website.

Per your question about plumbing into the house: The Storm Pump is primarily a hand pump for emergency water from your well. If you want to pressurize your house system, the "faucet" is designed to take a hose connection and you can pump water directly into your pressure system by connecting to the house system. The Storm Pump will pump water up to 100psi. The seals have been endurance tested to that pressure. If you want to make a more permanent connection to the house system, the outlet from the Storm Pump can be plumbed directly into your pitless sytem at the well. Details will vary with your individual well design. I am also very technically inclined, enough so that I know that one answer will not fit every existing system. Phone consultation is required.

"Where does the water leave the pump from?" It is a hand pump designed with a variable diameter outlet/faucet on the pump, at the well.
 

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Thanks

" hand pump designed with a variable diameter outlet/faucet on the pump, at the well" -- Well if the hand pump water flow outlet isn't below the frost line then its not going to be a lot of help for us folks up north that have any kind of winter.

Even if you have a 'drainback' below the frost line the water hose above ground will most likely freeze anyway --- so if you want this to be a real life backup (not temporary) solution for anyone outside of the south you'll need to help explain how to have a "do it yourselfer" connect this directly to the pitless with the connection thats already there for the electric pump
 
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