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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
don't know about the rest up you, but in my mind, I sorta keep a list of: What has to be done, what needs to be done, and what I would like to have done, in that order of priority. Sadly having a water well dug falls into the last category. But living on public water does concern me, there are so many things that could go wrong, that would stop the flow of water. Of course, when people have water well dug, they usually use an electric pump to get the water from the well, but in case of no electric, a rope and bale system can be used and pull about 3 gallons of water out the well per trip, using nothing but human power.
I know a lot of people store water, In my mind, for a few days, or even a week or so, ok, but much more than that I don't see it practical, least not for me with limited storage space. I have also considered buying a water tank that fits into the bed of a truck to make trips to the river to retrieve water.
I don't know, a person, or at least speaking of myself only, has limited money, and there always seems to be things that really need attention, and money. It's hard to invest a considerable amount of money on something that may never be used.
Your thoughts we be more that welcomed.
 

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If you live in the right area a sand point can be done without anyone knowing and they work well.
For years they were used here.
Research Sand point well.
 

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Instead of the cost of a well, you might consider a rain collection & storage system. Everyone should have some type water purification system. I only screen the rain water going into my tanks. That way I only have to purify the water required for drinking, cooking, etc.
 

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Lots of options well with electric pump, well with hand pump, well with drop tube, sistern rain collection system,

A couple of things,

The cost of an in ground well is totally dependant on the depth of the ground water in your area. since you are from West Virginia I would like to know what the make up of your soil is, are you going to be drilling through rock etc.

A person can drill in a well by hand a half dozen ways.

A very large bladder style storage tank can meet your requirements for days of storage. Are you providing water for your self or do you need to water live stock???

How many gallons a day on average do you need. My cows consume about 60 gallons a day minimum, so storage is almost out of the question, however I have a 1000 gallon trailer with 2" pump so I can go to a water source and pump on a 1000 gallons and truck it home, we use this for spraying etc, but once the gasoline was gone I would be screwed,

Determine how many gallons a day you need, if no live stock, you are looking at a gallon per person in SHTF, storage considerations in this scenereo are really very minor, In our area of Michigan, the driest weather stretch will be 18 days with out rain. WV is pretty wet and rainy.

If you have eves you can collect water off you can get an easy 100 gallons.

Another side note, I have a 25 gallon bladder tank, when the electricity goes out, we can draw 14 gallons out of the faucet before no more trickles out.

14 gallons is a lot in bad conditions.

I have considered framing in a 50 or 100 gallon tank from tractor supply in the high point of our vaulted ceiling, you would need a combination vacuum breaker on the tank, and some substantial support, a 100 gallon tank and water would be 900 lbs +- but the water would fill up and drain out if the well and electric was off, you would need to place a spring check valve on the incoming water to the home, so the neighbors would not get to use your water, most homes and businesses have reduced pressure back flow preventor that will take the place of the check valve, be careful of your air gap fitting and it's ability to drain your water off. Just a few ideas.
 

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I second the rain water collection! There are lots of cheaper methods to get water than getting a well dug.

Unless you are in a very dry area - I'd put the well lower on the priority list and create a rain capture/storage system for a lot less. And then you can add a 'grey water' strategy to stretch that water you have a lot further than normal.
 

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Any building that already has rain gutters its quite inexpensive to set up a rain storage system. Just feed that rain from the down spouts to some containers. Use food grade barrels or totes, which ever seems cheaper in your area.
 

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One example of ways a sandpoint can be installed many of these have been installed in secret
 

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I think the right answer to water depends on context. You need to answer questions about your specific situation like how far you are from a reliable source, how often it usually rains, how much you use, and many other questions.

That said, I like rain collection as a starting point. First reason why is because it's passive. You don't need to expend much energy at all to harvest it. The larger your roof or collection surface is, the quicker it works. Second reason is because it's a much purer source than a stream. Depending on how well you maintain your system, you could probably drink for a few days without further treating it. I'd probably still filter it and boil (especially if it's sat for an extended period of time). Finally it's cheap and you cans scale it up or down as needed. You can start small with a tarp and a couple 5 gallon buckets and build your system up as your can more closely analyze how much you consume.

Wells are expensive. My father put one in at his cabin. I forget what the price was, but I know if they had to go much deeper, it would have exceeded his budget. The water can also contain mineral content that discolors your clothes or appliances. We constantly battle stains in our sinks and other surfaces. I know you can drink our well water, but we don't trust it yet until we get our filter system dialed in.

Above ground sources are great, but you'd consume valuable time and resources to get the water you need. I'd rather spend muscle, fuel, or both on other preps if possible.

The well clearly wins the convenience award though... and that says something too I guess.
 

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Drilling or boring a well can vary from a moderately difficult job for one person to an impossible job for well equipped professionals.

If you are actually planing to "dig" your well be prepared for a dry or very muddy water. A lot of homestead had them for hundreds of years.

Then you must be aware of contamination. I live with a creek across the back of my property and a well is safer than that.

Do you know a good dowser?
 

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Were getting a well drilled soon.. its gonna set us back 5gs and will be 180' deep. I want to set up a hand crank pump so if power goes out I'll be OK.
 

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There are several companies which sell well drilling equipment. As I recall from a while back, Deep Rock was one. Don't know if they still exist.
Do you need a permit? Are you going to do it in secret?
We've been on well and septic for 30 years. I'm planning for a small generator to run the pump as needed to fill the bathtub, etc. in a power failure. Long term, ???
Probably a solar setup Possibly one of those "solar generators". Still checking them out. The right one would double for travelling in the RV.
 
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