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I'd like to see it after running a 100 rounds thru it. I find it difficult to believe that it could stand up to any real range time. If someone ever sees a video on it firing, please post it for me. Until then, I wonder if it is dis-information to scare the jeepers out of the anti-gun people to enrage them into pushing for more and more restrictions on 3-D printers. The next thing You know, they'll be 3-D printing stolen credit cards or something worth real money.
 

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This guy is alive and well here in Texas. I'm waiting for more info before I form an opinion.

ETA: I have watched the video and it's pretty cool to see how it happens. The whole set up is only $800 right now. I just don't have enough info on how it works after it is built.
 

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There is another guy out there who just built a 3-D pistol. Sorry, don't have the link handy.
 

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Yes, and the feds are freaking out, saying that "any person could fabricate a weapon at home", well they should prob watch youtube instead of reading our posts, becouse there are all kinds of videos on zipguns and homemade shotguns. I would love to be a tester for them..
If the printer really is 800 thats crazy, becouse i was reading up on the pistol that was made, and they are talking about free plans, just load and print. The story was rather slanted, you can only guess which direction.
Shit, I would buy a printer, print the rifle and pistol, then take the printer back.. Sorry, but I would.
 

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Got to love the over reaction to it though by some congressional members now wanting to ban them because they can be made and not show on a metal detector. Now my question is are the bullets also plastic or is it even possible to build an effective bullet that won't show on a metal detector. So if the gun gets through, you basically have a plastic hammer as it won't be effective really with out the ammo now would it.
 

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I would prefer they stay under the radar until they become prevalent and successful. They are hyping this and its going to draw the ire of left wing anti zealots who will use it in general to further their anti gun mission. I've said this regarding 3D printed guns already and will repeat. The anti's will make the "files" out to be equivalent of child porn - you watch. If you possess the files you will be a felon in the future - I'll bet on it. Well I'm not a gambling person but you know what I mean.
 

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The barrels are still steel, no plastic will withstand the pressures. (yes even the carbon fiber barrels have a steel liner.
The spring in the magazine is also steel. They printed a couple of springs but they are not strong enough to lift the cartridges.
There is no law against making your own guns - the law is that they cannot be distributed or sold without paying the tax and a serial number.
 

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I bet you could get the drawings by email if you contacted the firm.
 

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A friend of mine did it the old fashioned way. He milled and turned a perfect Gold Cup replica. He also got to surrender it in an ATF raid on his neighborhood gun store. Dude was my next door neighbor and the raid was unjust but how does one fight the might of government without potentially paying the ultimate cost?
 

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The printers are expensive and so is the plastic media that they used to make the gun. It took them over twenty hours to "print" the gun and in that amount of time I can have a few 12 ga. shotguns, a couple of 9mm and 45 pistols made and usable. They won't be pretty but they will be functional guns.
 

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Check out this STAINLESS STEEL metal 3D printed 1911A1 Govt model pistol,
and MY COMMENTS
on their BLOG>
World?s First 3D Printed Metal Gun - Solid Concepts Blog

As a former professional gun smith with hundreds of Govt model pistol builds, I can state from experience that a pile of pistol parts can be a long way from a functioning, reliable, durable 1911 type pistol.

But they do get lots of credit for printing the barrel, WITH RIFLING, and having it stand up to 500 rds of .45 ACP ammo.

And for some idea of how revolutionary the 3D printers just might be on our future,
read Cory Doctorow's book MAKERS.
 

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While it's cool to see and I feel he's right, you can't ban guns for those that have decided that ban doesn't matter to them. I'd be surprised though when things go south and there is a true active resistance to the forces that be, that whole small machine shops aren't dedicated to making guns and munitions in secret. This isn't the 1800's and lots of people have the knowledge and the specs are out there. People understand the principles too and a smart engineer could completely build a new rifle system if it came to that and the means to make them. If we have to make casing from melted down car doors and bullets from brass candle holders, copper wiring, ceramics, or silver jewelry, we're going to make them, Then we're going to come for who betrayed us and hang them and their cohorts from the nearest tree. After we torture them for a while of course.
 

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Shotguns are the easiest guns to make - in 12ga and 410. You can also make 38s, 9mm, 45 and all from common steel pipe and some nails or screws.
With a bit of ingenuity you can make mortars, grenades, and even full auto weapons. If you add a bit of science in there you can have shoulder launched rockets, surface to air missiles and land mines that will stop most anything. All this from easily obtainable household and farm materials.
 
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I have some experience in 3D printing on a commercial level. The new process that was used to make the .45 is a type of laser sintering that fuses powdered metals into a solid mass. The way it works goes something like this....

A computer "solid model" of a part is sent to software that "slices" it into layers that are like a series of cross sections stacked together.

A 3D printer uses a laser to draw out the first layer. The powdered metals fuse wherever the laser hits, making that cross section solid.

The table containing the model lowers a fixed amount, and a spreader applies another thin layer of powdered metal.

The laser traces another slice on top of the first one. They then repeat this over and over until the finished part is "grown" on the platform.

In general, the process is slow and expensive. The materials alone are very expensive. The process isn't really well suited for mass production, which is why it's mostly used for rapid prototyping. The process also can't make smooth parts. The pieces made have "steps" that are equal to the thickness of each slice. These would typically be .005" (for parts made on a 3DS machine) down to .0006" (For parts made on an Objet type machine)

Smooth parts were produced by hand sanding, which isn't the best way to make precision parts.

We often made sample bottles for perfume manufacturers. These would be printed with the cap in place, and after printing, you could just unscrew the cap. I've also made sample adjustable wrenches as a technology demonstrator, and these were printed with the movable jaw and scroll in place and would function when finished. It's a cool process.

Is there a real threat of people cranking out guns in their basements with this technology? Ummm, no. As was pointed out, anyone with a small lathe and milling machine could make more weapons faster, and they would be better too.

As long as regular 2D blueprints exist (which can be made from any gun if you have basic measuring tools) it's not hard to generate the 3D computer solid models by using any decent 3D software. I use SolidWorks at home, but there are lots of software packages that can do the same thing.
 

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By the way, I think the hardest part to make in any weapon system is the primer.

Brass can be reloaded, bullets can be cast, gunpowder can be made easily (OK, it wouldn't be as good as modern commercial powders), but he primers are gonna be tricky. Yeah, you could reload them a few times if you had to, but I see primers as the weak link in the chain.
 
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