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In today's post we're going to go over how to put together a realistic bug out plan. "Bugging out" seems to be on practically every preppers mind nowadays and honestly, a lot of the discussion and commentary that's out there is just getting downright ridiculous. Today we're going to take a practical look at what bugging out should mean to you, how to devise multiple REALISTIC bugout plans, and why you should be spending a lot less time worrying about the big Doomsday bugout.

The other day, I just happened to catch the tail end of a "Doomsday Preppers" episode. Unless I'm looking for a cheap laugh, I tend to stay away from this show altogether because it honestly paints the preparedness community in a horrible light, provides really dumb and even dangerous information and advice and isn't even that entertaining. That being said, I made a point to count how many times the words "bug out" were used in the short time I watched it. (I also had a good laugh at the guy who ordered the mail-order bride to help him prep lol)

43….They used the term "bug out" 43 times in the matter of like 15 minutes. O.K. seriously, this is just getting silly. I don't know where this whole bugout obsession came from within the preparedness community, but it seems to me like everywhere you look, people are talking about bugout plans, bugout bags, bugout vehicles, bugout locations, bug out this, bug out that. I swear, I don't know where this idea of "refugee-ism" comes from, but I'm hoping this article will change a few perspectives about this issue today and maybe even set a few people down the road of practical preparedness.

Let's get this out of the way first. Bugging out can be absolutely necessary in a lot of disaster scenarios and a bugout plan and bugout bags/supplies/etc. NEED to be a part of your preps. It IS important. Notice however, that I said a PART of your preps. Please keep in mind that stuffing a bunch of stuff in a backpack and slinging an AR over your shoulder doesn't make you a prepper. It may make you "prepared" (not really) for that one in a million Hollywood "ZOMG the ZOMBIES!!!" scenario people seem to be obsessed with, but it's not exactly going to be much help during a house fire, a flood or any number of realistic disaster scenarios.

Priorities guys…It's all about priorities

There are basically 3 different classifications of bugouts, which are all very different from each other, should be prepared for differently and executed at different times. These classifications are determined by priority, preparation time and distance.

1. The immediate, drop what you're doing, "Get to the choppa!!!" right now bugout.

The first level or classification of bug out has nothing to do with SHTF, pandemics, or hordes of mutant biker raiders looking to take your supply of Mountain House food. This level of bug out is going to be for things like a house fire, an immediate first-aid situation, security threat, or even just getting locked out of your house.

These types of disasters are very real and are very common and should probably be one of the first types of scenarios you plan for when devising your bugout plans. These types of disasters frequently require immediate evacuations, and you probably won't have time to grab a bag or supplies, or heck… depending on the disaster, even pants! These are the types of disasters where you need a place and a person you can go to that can help you NOW. Not in an hour, not "let me try and call someone" but NOW.
continued
 

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I think the last two paragraphs are really what preppers are about. Self-sufficiency and simplifying life, while preparing for the common disasters that do happen ever;y year. Tornadoes, hurricanes and yes, floods. I've experienced a flood and wish I'd been better prepared for it. It literally took months to get back to "normal". A BOB would have been nice. As it was, it was get the kids in the dingy that we just happened to have and pull them out of the neighborhood through poisonous-snake infested waters (no joke) in the middle of the night, 2 nights after Christmas. Water 4' deep.

It never hurts to prepare. I just hope I never need these preps. As for having a gun. There are meth-heads in most good sized towns (I'm not talking cities) and a dog is not going to stop someone who doesn't feel pain. You bet your life I've got a gun or two. I've met several meth-heads through my work in the hospital from this area. 'Nough said.
 

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Overall I found him shortsighted, self important and self absorbed. The reality is we all don't live in the same place and have solid BOL's otherwise that are solid, private owned pieces of land whether ours or family or friends. Like most people in this world he seems to think everyone is in the same situation he is, set up like he is. Not looking at other peoples situation and that it makes things different. People talk about bugout aspects so much, because many of us are in living situations of rented apartments, condos or houses, in community areas that we know are in no way a place to survive when things go south. Most sane people don't plan around any zombie apocalypse. That's fantasy fun and we see it as such. What we do is very much acknowledge that the world teeters on a fragile edge, with many possibilities that could bring it to it's knees putting a long term halt to our supply lines that feed our consumer based society. As a former truck driver I know that if those trucks stop rolling, this country in mass, will starve and tear itself apart. Disruption to fuel or other power sources for a long enough time, with no quick way to fix it will do that. All those fuel stations are digital systems now run off the grid. Some have there own generators, but not all.

I can't speak for everyone, but I believe most as I do, don't have bugout bags and plans that there implemented in, for fires, storms, or minor crisis's. That's what those are too me, minor. I was raised and have lived most of my life in south Florida. I've been through more hurricanes and power outages, living by what can be heated on a propane grill and woods fire, boiling and purifying water than you count on your hands. Generators sad to say weren't a part of most of them. My family has no problem living without air conditioning if we have to, TV, and other luxuries. We can tough it out just fine. Even if you have to leave town for a while, that's not the kind of bugout a prepared B.O.B. is for. That's minor. That's driving to families place, or friends or hotel at most where everything is fine. You've got time to pack for that, with items for sitting around having a good time in many ways. B.O.B.'s are for major change and go where you can and surviving as long as you can when it really has gone to shit and you're probably not coming home anytime soon, if ever.
 

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"the world teeters on a fragile edge, with many possibilities that could bring it to it's knees putting a long term halt to our supply lines that feed our consumer based society."


Acknowledging that reality and making some personal preparations to cope with "what ifs", short term and long term, are what defines us all Preppers.

IMHO, having a GENUINE FORMAL full fledged Bug Out Plan [ and the accompanying BOB ] is primarily for those who are stuck in a location where too many people could soon be fighting over too few resources. Personally, I long ago chose to live on a small, fairly isolated semi tropical Pacific North West Gulf Island. Food here on the island is plentiful for the full time population, either through foraging or hunting, but water supplies in the Summer time could be a problem with no power, and/or long term. Drinking water is available primarily from DEEP wells and a very few private surface springs, but other than this potential water issue, I can't think of any place I'd rather be, good times or bad. Except of course for some continental ravaging tsunami, and if that happens I don't see me or many others making it, no matter how many bug out bags we have.

I have few plans to bug out anywhere else, AND If I did decide to bug out, being on an island, I would probably take my BIG boat.
Different strokes for different folks indeed.

But I think that everyone, regardless of how serious they are about prepping for cataclysmic and/or long term disasters, should have some sort of short term Emergency Kit stored in a bag? Box? backpack? trailer? Motorhome? or even a big boat? for those special occasions that life can and will throw at us. I grew up in Saskatchewan Canada, which in the Winter has only one wind break between you and the North pole. And that wind break is a barbed wire fence, and usually at least one of the wires is gone. So it gets FFffNN COLD in the Winter. Every one I knew had some sort of emergency kit in their vehicle trunk for "just in case".

Call it what ever you want, "Bug Out Bag, or "Emergency Kit", it makes sense to have something with you at all times.
... and if your "BUG OUT gear also double as your recreational gear, you can get double the use out of it.

BTDT
I used to carry a military duffle bag full of tools and "Emergency Supplies" EVERYWHERE in my 4X4 van. And that 4X4 van did indeed go off roading, and down some intersting and isolated back roads. I did this for years, and even though that gear got used fairly often for "RECREATIONAL CAMPING", I can only remember actually NEEDING that gear once in anything like a genuine "emergency" situation. We were camping at an isolated cabin when a wind storm blew down a BIG tree on to the roof. OK FINE .... out comes the small 16" chain saw, the 4' JACKALL, and a few other things, and that fallen tree was almost instantly turned into firewood.
Not too feasible or easy without those "emergency kit tools", but fairly easy with them.

These days I ride around in a small motor home, with even more space than that big old 4X4 converted Ford van. And these days my "EMERGENCY GEAR" is set up in LAYERS, with the entire motorhome being one layer, with supplies and tools stored everywhere within. A backpack full of "WALK AWAY " gear is ready to go on a few minutes notice, stored inside the MOTORHOME. A folding bicycle is also inside the motorhome, and that folding bike also has panniers loaded with basic survival gear inside them. And those panniers and the back pack have smaller belt pack sized "day kits" inside of them. I also often have a folding two person kayak along for the rides as well.

If anything, I have TOO MUCH gear ....
and this is coming from a guy who once wrote a book about backpacking, urging the GO LIGHTLY approach.

BUT,
You can always ditch or stache your extra gear, and perhaps come back for it, however if you don't have it with you when the dime drops, finding the right gear quickly and conveniently WHEN YOU REALLY NEED IT, might be an impossibility.

So TOO MUCH may often be better than NOT ENOUGH ...
unless of course you are on foot. Too much gear when on foot, and being unable to move quickly when you need to, means mostly that you will just die tired.
YPMMV,
every situation is different and the layered approach means greater flexibility to me.
LAZ 1
[;{)
 

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These are all valid points and explanations. if you have the ability to pack up why not pack up your home? or even have bug out location that can be moved in a mater of minutes, not hours or days? take a look at my SpaceMax shelters. SPACEMAX | INSTANT REDEPLOYABLE WORKFORCE ACCOMMODATIONS ANYWHERE ON EARTH
But wait! If we act now will we get not one, but two spacemax's for the price of one, pay separate shipping and handling and processing fees not eligible with any other offer?
 

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why the heck would merely being locked out of your house be a life threatening situation? break a window and get in, if it's so cold! other wise, get in with a neighbor, call a cab or locksmith, etc. Why aint you got a spare key someplace?
 

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having a bob is simple, low cost and fun, and can easily be very helpful. Like everything else, many people go overboard with stuff, and even more have little in the way of sense or real ability.
 

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the biggest problem I see with prepper's bugging out plans - they plan to bug out .... not all SHTFs are bug out time .... something like a natural disaster hit and you'll probably stay with your home for various reasons .... and many preppers don't have any supplies at home besides their BOBs .... if a pandemic SHTF gets started and half the family is down - good luck with that bug out to the prepared BOL ....

another problem I see with bug out plans - and it's somewhat touched on in the article - sure it might be bug out or die - but in the majority of the major SHTFs there's a substantial time period preceding that critical point .... where's the plan to secure the home and protect it somewhat for a post-SHTF return? .... I've never see a single bug out prone prepper talk about winterizing their home .... the family survives the SHTF but returns to a home destroyed by frozen piping - and no resources to remedy ....
 

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Unless absolutely necessary,stay home.how you gonna carry all that bugout stuff?.in a u-haul van you just rented?.really,how many people have a way to transport all your bugout stuff unless you really have a good bol thats really stocked well that has not been recently occupied or looted or even burned down?.


Illni warrior had a point on the last paragraph of his post,how are you going to prepare or repair you home when you have to come back,after the pipes froze,been looted,or re-occupied with squatters that have made your home theirs and taken your stuff you couldn't take?.
 
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