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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
For me, one of the most difficult things to learn was to think tactically. I think its an important skill to have, to be able to rapidly evaluate a potential threat and immediately determine and be able to act on any tactical advantages and to mitigate disadvantages. I think the members here with military and especially SF backgrounds will agree that it does not come easy. Its something you have to practice and drill constantly. My father could look at a man and tell you in a instant whether he would fight or not. He could walk into any given situation and immediately sum everything up and give you clear tactical advantages and disadvantages.

So I thought maybe this would be a good subject of discussion here, time will tell…
 

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grew up doing martial arts, and doing a personal threat assessment is difficult (I'm lucky had some good instructors, but I can only assess males, and I'm only right 75% of the time) it's a difficult skill that side anyway

to the tactics used in "right now" I'm almost (if not) as useless as you, I understand cover, being small, small battles, "high ground" but can't put it into practice, maybe someone may be willing to give some theory lessons here??
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well I teach this sort of thing and its not easy. As I stated I had a hard time learning to think tactically and now I have a hard time getting students to that point as well...
 

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It does take time, but it also takes dedication to the skill and a mental ability to look and read people, think fast and understand your capabilities to deal with different situation and surroundings. Not everyone has it or cares to. That's fine though. The world needs sheep. I've found over the years that while an assessment of a person can be accurate having learned to read body language and eye contact, there's also those who purposely put on a mask and hide who they are and what they can do. Than there's also those that portray themselves as tough with an overly aggressive appearance, who are really little bitches once they get hit. I prefer to stay focused on situational awareness tactical and keep track of everyone's movement, never taking too much for granted, and looking for surprises and hidden weapons and abilities.




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Simply trust no one, "UNTIL" proven otherwise.

Every place I go I'm thinking about it. Gets to be second mature after awhile. You have to get yourself to that level to be safe, IMO. Shut off the stupid cell phone and quit talking to the wife, kids or buddies and keep your head on a swivel. All you can do is put up a strong front and be ready, ALL THE TIME. Sorry I can't help with how to train sheople to think and act like this. We all can't be wolves.
 

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Leading men into combat takes allot of training and skill.. Thats is why there are several Leadership Development schools in the Military <In my case Army PLDC, BNOC, ANOC,>..Being a veteran of leading men into combat on several occasions if I didn't have the proper training I would have failed in my mission and bringing everyone home alive....I am very fortunate I had never lost a Team member under my command or on a mission and I accredit this to the training I received and the good men and best equipment I was fortunate to have during wartime...
 
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Kind of a load post. No one can tell what someone is going to do before they do it. You can shoot someone then say he was going to do x but how can he argue the point.
In a military sitting you always have rules of engagement that govern your action. In a non military environment your personal Morals are your rules of engagement.
Tactical think is more of a What if, If not his than that way of thinking.

If we could shoot everyone based on what we though they might do we would shot have the people we saw each day.
We had indicators things we watched for that would cause us to focus more on a target.
Applying the if not this than that line of thinking and action
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well Smitty I am not advocating shooting someone because I think he might do something. I am simply speaking of being able to tactically asses a given situation and decide quickly on the best tactical advantage to be achieved if things jump off bad. And to rapidly identify the likely threats. To know before they act would be seeing the future and I don’t believe in such things.
 

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Thinking tactically has both serious advantages, . . . and serious disadvantages.

If you develop a "tactic" to which you go too often, . . . your enemy sees that, . . . and will use it against you.

As an example, . . . an old school rule is never use the same trail to come back on, . . . that you went out on. Generally this is good, . . . but if the enemy sees you do this twice, . . . you can bet both your butt cheeks that the road back will be mined the next time they catch you leaving the secured area.

But OTOH, . . . having a preset "tactic" as the go-to answer to an anticipated problem, . . . it can save your butt, because everyone then will react in a manner that all the others can predict, anticipate, and rely upon.

Tactics is most effective when the "tactical commander" has a good grip on reality, . . . his forces, . . . his strengths, . . . and his weaknesses. But even then, . . . the best tactics may not save you, . . . remember the Alamo.

May God bless,
Dwight
 

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Situational awareness is one thing while tactics is another.
Kind of crossing the street. Looking both ways before crossing is situational awareness. Walking running or doing handsprings while crossing the street is tactics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Situational awareness is one thing while tactics is another.
Kind of crossing the street. Looking both ways before crossing is situational awareness. Walking running or doing handsprings while crossing the street is tactics.
But I am talking about being tactically thinking and being able to rapidly quantify a situation and take a tactical advantage if possible. It is different than situational awareness on its on.
 

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Without going into a long winded statement, practice situational awareness, decide on a plan of action, and act decisively and violently on that plan. You can leave out the violently part if not needed. Make a decision and act upon it.
 

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Without going into a long winded answer: tactics are essentially actions designed to give the one using them an advantage over their opponent.

For example: a "tactic" we used to teach in the infantry was called "Bounding Overwatch", . . . where one unit would sit in a position where they could watch and if necessary, defend the movements of their brother unit. Think unit as regiment, batallion, company, platoon, squad, team, or individual, . . . it all works the same.

That moving unit would "bound" up to a new position, . . . and then become the overwatching unit, . . . and the other unit would then move up to a new position.

This "tactic" was slow, . . . but afforded good protection to the moving unit. BUT, . . . it is an excellent technique that affords protection at all times, . . . rathter than simple reaction.

It is something that has to be taught, though, . . . most folks who have no infantry training of any sort, . . . think the infantry gets on some kind of a line left and right, . . . and starts marching across the landscape, . . . looking for the bad guys. THAT will get your unit washed up, wiped out, clocks cleaned, and buried.

And actually, . . . all "tactics" in the real sense are learned responses to a perceived threat. The OP's father had "learned" to read people, . . . a wonderful talent, . . . but not in itself a tactic, . . . as it cannot be codified, sliced, diced, and taught as People Reading 101.

I personally have very poor people reading skills, . . . I tend to follow Mean Green's idea: Be polite, be professional, but have a plan to kill everybody you meet.

It served me well in Vietnam, . . . and on the streets since I came home in '68. The statement itself may look to be a bit overboard, . . . but when you are dealing with people you do not know, . . . relaxing your guard is what makes money for undertakers.

May God bless,
Dwight
 

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Speed, Surprise and Violence of action always worked for me when there was no time for a grand plan.
In other words just go Mel Gibson nuts on them quickly.
 
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