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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy all! Currently looking to move from the city back into the country with a catch, i'll be having my home built. I'll be looking to have mine somewhat self sufficient, solar & well etc. but not looking for a completely self sufficient homestead.
I need some guidance, though, on where to look for efficient floor plans/ideas for a home in a colder climate that isn't going to break the bank to build. I'm not rich, just looking to get out of town.
Anyone with experience in living out of city limits in a mostly-off-grid home?
 

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If you're building new, consider building of brick or block (not facade brick). Both are much better at repelling 5.56/308 rounds than siding and sheet rock.

And if you can find one a wood fired external hot water boiler makes a lot of sense compared with a wood stove in the house. A bit more effort to run, but we had two at our prison that we used to keep the green houses warm during the winter. three times a day to check and reload the firebox.

Good luck
 

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Do you realize how much the democrats have raised the price of gasoline? Best get ready to walk to the the store and to work unless working at home aint an option. What can a person do to make a living sitting at home? It seems like a mystery wrapped in an enigma type thing lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Do you realize how much the democrats have raised the price of gasoline? Best get ready to walk to the the store and to work unless working at home aint an option. What can a person do to make a living sitting at home? It seems like a mystery wrapped in an enigma type thing lol.
I hear you, traveling to town is going to be a change in our priorities, making less trips, for only necessary items for sure. As for heading to work, my work commute is currently from my bedroom to my office down the hall. I've been working from home for a few years now, supporting my wife & I, in our house. Its doable if you're in the right field. Just depends on your profession.
 

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I hear you, traveling to town is going to be a change in our priorities, making less trips, for only necessary items for sure. As for heading to work, my work commute is currently from my bedroom to my office down the hall. I've been working from home for a few years now, supporting my wife & I, in our house. Its doable if you're in the right field. Just depends on your profession.
Any recommended professions to get into?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Any recommended professions to get into?
I work in insurance. I'd recommend looking into that. I've been with Allstate for 8 years now, not sales mind you, but started in claims now I'm a trainer. They're a good company that pays pretty well & pays for all the equipment you need for your work.
 

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Kindly read up on this and report back for a possible pop quiz on Tuesday. Thanks. lol. One of my old preachers built two "Health Sheltered houses next to each other one for him and one for his Mama in Law on the same property. Faced South got a lot of sun and his electric bill was reidiculously low. Tornadoes was not an issue and he lived in Tornado alley so that came in handy.
 

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Colder climates aren't ultra budget friendly to build in, especially for doing things right. Few things I'd recommend is 1) spray foam insulation, it's pricey but will save you money in the long run. In addition to this I would suggest going a zone colder for insulation, and on the topic triple pane windows. 2) If applicable wood, preferably wood and another heat source, if your property has acres or maybe your neighbor is a logger I would strongly suggest a wood stove. 3) Pexs plumbing, much easier to deal with that copper. 4) if your budget allows look into generating your own electricity, we have two wind turbines and a lot of roof mounted solar panels, what's nice is the electric company sends us a check every month for what we don't use. At the very least a generator.
A few odds and ends tips are keep your ceilings low, heat rises vaulted ceilings are aesthetically pleasing but not for your thermostat. Another point of interest is a mudroom, it will not only provide a good spot to take off wet/snowy clothing but also provide a wind break for certain section of your home.
 

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Kindly read up on this and report back for a possible pop quiz on Tuesday. Thanks. lol. One of my old preachers built two "Health Sheltered houses next to each other one for him and one for his Mama in Law on the same property. Faced South got a lot of sun and his electric bill was reidiculously low. Tornadoes was not an issue and he lived in Tornado alley so that came in handy.
I actually thought of building me something like that but with solar and wind, may be hydro for power.
 

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I watched one of the Alaska shows one day.think it was building Alaska, but not sure.a man built a home for him and family.he built it larger than needed.then came in a certain distance.and framed out the rooms.which gave them two walls.the outside walls with storm windows and doors.then the inside walls with windows.but not sure about doors thoe.both walls insulated.the home is up and off the ground, so the bottom side of the flooring got insulated as well.my concern in that concept,is keeping the walkway between the walls warm.
 

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Oh man, that is the dream, isn't it? Up in the mountains with the chickens and some goats and my dogs. We'll probably start off living in a trailer while we build our little home. I can't wait! It's what we're planning on, but the man says he has to work 7 more years. Honestly I don't think we have that much time before something really bad happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Oh man, that is the dream, isn't it? Up in the mountains with the chickens and some goats and my dogs. We'll probably start off living in a trailer while we build our little home. I can't wait! It's what we're planning on, but the man says he has to work 7 more years. Honestly I don't think we have that much time before something really bad happens.
That's one reason we're looking to square this away before 2024 at the latest. Might end up moving a little faster if we can swing it.
I look forward to being out of the city, to be honest. Ready for the peace & quiet of the countryside.
 

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Just a few thoughts for you to consider. I live in a log home I built myself 25 years ago, still going strong in it.
1. Geothermal is the most cost effective way to reduce your heating (air and water) and cooling bills. As you might expect, more expensive than traditional forms of heating and cooling but payback is quick and maintenance is simple.
2. Ceiling fans make a huge difference in heating and cooling. Inexpensive to purchase, install, operate and maintain.
3. Take advantage of passive solar as much as possible. Large south facing windows with large overhangs to shade from summer sun. Tile or stone floors inside those large sout facing windows to act as a heat sink. A small sun room on your south end can provide a tremendous amount of heating in winter. Just make sure you can shade or ventilate that room in the summer.
Help yourself and do a little research on sustainable home building. You’ll see a wide range of things and you’ll find a few that you will want to use. Home building takes patience. Especially with all of our current supply chain issues but the end product is all yours, the way you want it.
Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Just a few thoughts for you to consider. I live in a log home I built myself 25 years ago, still going strong in it.
1. Geothermal is the most cost effective way to reduce your heating (air and water) and cooling bills. As you might expect, more expensive than traditional forms of heating and cooling but payback is quick and maintenance is simple.
2. Ceiling fans make a huge difference in heating and cooling. Inexpensive to purchase, install, operate and maintain.
3. Take advantage of passive solar as much as possible. Large south facing windows with large overhangs to shade from summer sun. Tile or stone floors inside those large sout facing windows to act as a heat sink. A small sun room on your south end can provide a tremendous amount of heating in winter. Just make sure you can shade or ventilate that room in the summer.
Help yourself and do a little research on sustainable home building. You’ll see a wide range of things and you’ll find a few that you will want to use. Home building takes patience. Especially with all of our current supply chain issues but the end product is all yours, the way you want it.
Good luck.
That is great advice, &I'll take it to heart. Could you expand on the geothermal portion though?
 

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Cold area you want a heat source that needs no power to operate. Which takes out boilers and heat pumps. Good ole wood burner in the center of house or basement. Cause it sure is nice sitting in a warm house listening to the blizzard outside not worrying about power.

We load up the basement with wood on the warm days. Then when it's -20, snowy and freezing. We enjoy the heat and NEVER have to go outside for a week or 2.
 

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That is great advice, &I'll take it to heart. Could you expand on the geothermal portion though?
Geothermal energy utilizes the relatively stable temperature of the Earth’s soil layer (approx 46 degrees). Tubing filled with methanol is laid in trenches about four feet deep and connected to a heat exchanger. In the summer the cool temp is used to cool air for air conditioning, in the winter, the now relatively warm circulating liquid is used to pretreat the air or water that is then heated further to provide heat to your home. Using only a few low energy pumps, you get very efficient and cost effective heating and cooling. I’m explaining it kinda simply and I’m sure that there are geothermal dealers in your area that can help you crunch the numbers for your area relative to geothermal vs other heat and cooling sources. Remember that it is more expensive in the beginning but over a relatively few years you will have gained back that investment. Retrofitting an existing home is more expensive and so has a longer payback period.
Good luck with the adventur of building a new home.
 
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