Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 14 of 49 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've only read the first two chapters (just got the book today) but I already know it's going to be a great guide to using a Baofeng and emergency communications in general. It'll probably be required reading for our CH3 group.

It has just about everything a non-radio noob needs to know and still has a lot to offer old radio geeks.

...description from the amazon page:
The Guerrilla's Guide To The Baofeng Radio is a handbook for those finding themselves in an austere environment, an underground resistance, or going into harm's way with one of the most common pieces of communications equipment in the world. Going far beyond simple programming or what's written from the Amateur Radio perspective, this manual goes in-depth on how to communicate, creating a communications plan, improvised wire antennas, digital operations and encryption in an easy to follow, step-by-step format based on combat proven methods. Whether you've just invested in a few of the inexpensive radios for an uncertain future or find yourself in rough corners of the world, this manual covers how to create communications where there otherwise would be none.

Organism Font Poster Pattern Publication
Ecoregion Vertebrate Natural environment World Organism
 

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This afternoon I passed my Technician class license test.
Congratulations! You opened the door to tremendous resource to have when the SHTF. If you want any help from a well established, nation wide group of ham and non-ham prepper comms folks let me know.

If you didn't already know there are a couple of groups in MO that would also be happy to assist in any way they can:
Missouri Newton MURS/CH3 151.94 Voice Every Tuesday 1900 hrs local
Missouri Willow Springs 2m 146.42 Voice 1st & 3rd Thursday 1900 local

There are certainly more groups by now, these are just the ones I have on my (outdated) national list.

When you get your General make sure you get plugged into the national HF prepper nets.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
There are two parts to our local net. There's open traffic where we just make sure everything is working and everyone can get in touch with everyone else. It's all open and in the clear. We also pass a Net Word Of The Week (NWOTW) every week. If something happens during the week, the NWOTW becomes one of three "keys" required to read certain messages. There's also a national NWOTW that comes out on the national nets.

This book (in post #1) goes into some good detail on how it all works. ...but none of it does any good if folks don't know how to really use a radio ;)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The neat thing about the Channel 3 Project is no one has to be a member of anything. The CH3 Project, in one form or another, pre-dates AmRRON by many years. AmRRON is just providing an organized way for local individuals and groups to communicate with each other at the regional and national level.

There are advantages to becoming a core member of AmRRON and they've got a lot of great stuff going on, but just so folks know, you don't have to join anything to take advantage of it.

By my outdated list, there are almost 100 groups (MAGs) around the country that run local CH3 project nets on non-ham and ham bands that can communicate with each other. Most preppers would agree that there are advantages to belonging to a MAG. Imagine the advantages of having that MAG communicating with 100 other MAGs.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
When I eventually distribute my collection of pre-programmed radios
You might consider distributing those radios now and starting your own "friends and family emergency chat group". That's all a basic, simple CH3 net is. ...they get more involved and much more powerful/useful from there but that's all you basically need. But even a simple net takes pratice. You'd be amazed at how hard it can be to successfully get 3 or 4 people to be able to communicate when there's no emergency and everyone has a cellphone to sort out all the little problems that noobs have with their radio.

I'd like to give the recipients some info on what to listen for.
It's deliberately simple: if the phones aren't working turn on the radio and turn to FRS Ch3 or MURS Ch3. If they have a CB, turn to CB Ch3. If power is an issue and you have conserve your battery, only turn the radio on from 10 minutes before the hour to 10 minutes after the hour. Just talk in plain english. (also if the commercial FM stations go off the air, scan the FM band at the top of every hour anyway and listen for "Radio Free Republic" broadcasts that will pass news and information and help local groups get in touch with each other)

It's an order of magnitude more likely to work if everyone has practiced it a few times.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)
Does it have any value being only one radio for a SHTF scenario or would I need to have more of them? I dont even know fully how it works until I find the manual again. thank you
Having one radio is better than having no radio. ...but, your betting that one radio will survive through whatever disaster you're going to face. You're also betting that everyone you might need to talk to already has a radio.

We're living in the glory days of good radios that will program outside the ham bands and cost less than $25. Most folks don't realize what a sweetheart situation we're in right now. Sadly, these days won't last forever. The FBI, FCC, FTC and the ARRL all want cheap chinies radios to go away.

There are plenty of UV-5R's still available in the $20 range and there are plenty of similar radios for <$30. ...If I need a pack of socks from amazon, I don't checkout without picking up another UV-5R or UV-9S or some radio doodads I'll need down the road. ...the same way none of us leave walmart without a couple extra cans of beef stew

Edit: Here's a UV-5R manual that's been translated from chinglish to English
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #32 · (Edited)
Technically, they're already illegal for sale and use in the US. It's just they're not clamping down on it.
Show me where they're illegal for sale in the US. The FCC tried and failed to restrict their import in 2018 and that led to a firestorm of internet hysterics that's still floating around but they aren't, and never were, illegal for sale in the US.

what is best and what will work with the one I already have
Don't panic buy anything ;) You've got plenty of time to do your homework. Youtube has all the info you need to learn what you need for YOUR prepping requirements. ...just take it all with a huge grain of salt

Any of the radio your looking at will work together just fine and all the menus will be close enough to the same that you'll probably never notice the difference. All the ones you show have a Kenwood style mic jack so all the cables and accessories will be interchangeable. (I think all the cheap chinies radios use Kenwood jacks except the waterproof ones)

Look for "dual band". Tri-band is fine but you'll likely never use the 1.25m band so don't pay extra for it. 8w is better than 5w but a good antenna and good operating technique is a heck of a lot more important than the extra 3 watts.

Don't spend a lot of money on package deals with a bunch of doodads you'll never use. Buy barebone radios and pick your own doodads separately.

IMHO if cost is an issue, when the SHTF it's better to have 3 UV-5Rs than one BF-F8.

Most important, any radio is a just a paperweight if you or the folks you want to talk to don't know how to use them
 

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I was under the impression that they violated FCC regs due to power output on bands which restrict, but that would only make them illegal to use. AFAIK, sales were not in question.
Correct. The comment was about sales being illegal. It's illegal to operate any radio outside the ham bands if it's only certified for ham bands. The reason the FCC doesn't like them (and we do) is they have the ability to operate outside the ham bands. There are (at least) three reasons they can't legally be operated on FRS: tx power is too high, antennas are removable and they're not certified for FRS freqs.

Baofeng got around the FCC and FTC problems by shipping the radios "locked" to the ham bands. ...but it takes about 3 seconds to unlock them.

The FBI doesn't like them because they're the favorite radio of preppers, militias and antifa (150 antifa shitheads didn't coordinate their assault on the Atlanta training center without using baofengs. Baofengs also played a major part in the January 6th. "insurrection")


Strongly considering this one for the 2m compatability:
As far as I know all baofengs have 2m. I've got UV-S9 Pro's and UV-S9 Plus. They're different somehow but I don't remember what it is. I got them because they can charge straight off of USB or in the charge stand.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #38 ·
OK, let's argue semantics.
Semantics?!?!? There's a HUGE difference between "illegal to sell" and "use illegally". It's not illegal to sell a gun. It is illegal to buy one and use it to rob a liquor store.

Show me where they're legal to USE in the US.
Your grasping at weak straws BPH. If something isn't against some law it's not illegal.
But since you asked, it's right here on the back of the radio. (or in Title 47 CFR if the radio doesn't have an FCC ID#)
Font Material property Electronic device Electronics accessory Electric blue



Nice try BPH, you're hoping nobody will read the link and somehow it says something that proves me wrong. But it says exactly what I've been saying this whole thread.

You keep trying to nitpick everything I say but you're always wrong. If you just wait and skulk long enough, I'll get some little fact wrong and you can have a field day. Until then just leave me the hell alone.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Try reading it yourself.
Try reading what I wrote before you put your foot any deeper in your mouth.

There are (at least) three reasons they can't legally be operated on FRS: tx power is too high, antennas are removable and they're not certified for FRS freqs.
Q1: Does the UV-5R have a detachable antenna?
Q2: Do FRS radios allow detachable antennas?
Q3: What is the maximum wattage allowed on the FRS band?
Q4: What is the minimum wattage the UV-5R is capable of?
Like I said
...it says exactly what I've been saying this whole thread.
You read one thing and your brain twists it around into something completely different. You can't pull shit like that on a newsgroup when the truth is just a few posts up the page.

Now go back to your little fantasy world and try to find something I said that you can try to twist into the exact opposite.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #45 ·
One thing it made me aware of is that I had not been considering FRS or GMRS or MURS or CB
I am not sure what I am going to do to adjust my thought process in that regard but it's been brought to my attention.
You just have the option now to go beyond short range, line of sight, local simplex. With your tech license you can use repeaters and cover some really large areas. I don't know what part of the state your in but If you can reach the SMLRS (Southwest Missouri Linked Repeater System) you can reach like minded folks/groups in a good part of 4 states with your baofeng. When you knock out your general license you'll be able to do it world wide on HF.

Sidenote: there are lots of free websites with study tools and practice exams. HamExam is a good one ...just saying;)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
574 Posts
Discussion Starter · #48 ·
I'm in South St Louis County
Your in the heart of ham radio activity. There's at least one linked repeater system in your area (probably several others). This one covers Illinois and eastern MO. The St. Louis repeater for the linked system is working but it looks like the link to central Illinois is down right now.

If you join a local ham radio club you'll learn more in a hour talking to the local guys than you could ever learn on your own.

And as if on cue Harbor Freight put these on sale for $9 down from $15.
Apache cases are like ammo cans, you can never have enough. They're on sale here too, I'm heading out to grab a few.
 
1 - 14 of 49 Posts
Top