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...and that's what I'm doing research on at the present. As I've mentioned in previous posts, I'm wanting to move on beyond just guns and ammo, I have a couple of months of grocery store food and freeze dried survival foods each as part of my desire to take care of the wife and myself. Food, water and equipment are as important in there own right. While at a store where bulk items like beans, rice, flour and pastas can be purchased, the thought struck me as to how do you store a large volume other than a 3 to 5 gal bucket with oxygen absorbers and then have stock that could go bad before you can use it. As every one using this part of the forum already knows, the newbie dumb guy just discovered that there's a wealth of info online and especially through U-Tube on the subject. Hope you'd bear with me on asking questions as right now my primary goal is learning about canning dry goods and hoping that it will be an avenue to get the wife interested in what I'm doing.
 
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I know meat can be canned. I dont believe dry goods can be canned as it is usually kept in a medium. vinegar etc. Im gonna be tackling canning this spring/summer when my garden is off the hook.
 

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There are a ton of good videos on youtube.com about canning.

Here is what I suggest to anyone who asks me about it:

1 - Buy jars, lids, rings now, while they are cheap. They will soon be skyrocketing and will be off the shelves just like ammo.

2 - Canning is a renewable resource that can help you for years to come. But make sure you buy enough lids - 10x or more as many as you have jars. Lids are the primers, if you will, of the canning community. Without them you can load as much brass as you want but it still ain't going bang when you pull the trigger ... well, you get the point.

3 - Spend the extra money and invest in a good, gasket-less, pressure cooker ... the biggest one you can afford. You can always buy smaller ones down the road, but the first one should be something akin to a 55 gallon drum with lid clamps like they use on the cargo holds of Great Lakes mineral barges.

4 - Invest in more jars, lids and rings.

5 - Invest in more jars, lids and rings.

6 - Oh yeah, don't forget to put away plenty of the canning salt, the sugar, the vinegar, the paraffin and the alum (or you can use grape leaves).
 

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I gotta admit, even after reading your post a couple more times ... I'm still not exactly sure what your question is friend?

Are you worried about canning dry goods in Mylar bags, in buckets ... are you worried that things will go bad before you can use them once opened? If that's the case simply pack smaller quantities in smaller backs, compartmentalized, and then put them all in a larger bag and bucket and use as needed.

Are you looking to store in something bigger, like 25 gallon pony drums?

Are you asking about how to use Mylar bags?

While at a store where bulk items like beans, rice, flour and pastas can be purchased, the thought struck me as to how do you store a large volume other than a 3 to 5 gal bucket with oxygen absorbers and then have stock that could go bad before you can use it.
You were at this store where said bulk items could be purchased ... Sam's or Costco or somewhere I assume? And you experienced an epiphany with regard to wondering how one might go about storing a large volume of dry goods (see list of said bulk items you noted earlier), OTHER THAN using the conventional and widely accepted prepper strategy of using Mylar bags and 5 gallon buckets?

Well, a lot of us use #10 cans ... your local LDS will help you with that.

Or, you could use glass jars, large ones ... but glass breaks and it is also transparent. Unless you paint them they will allow sunlight in and your preps will not last as long.

Some people that I know save their big popcorn tins from Wally World Christmas time every year, and they load those up, lined with Mylar of course. Much tougher for critters to nibble through those.

I'm either just not sure why you would not want to use buckets and Mylar, or I am just not sure I am doing a very good job trying to help you.
 

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I have been canning since I was 15 and you can can dried goods but i never have seen the point. As long as it is kept properly it will last longer in a dried state IMO. Now canning fruit, vegies and meat, they each have their own rules to go by. I wouldnt get a massive canner you have to be able to handle it. My canner can hold 7 qts. or 14 pts. Theres a difference between hot water bath canning and presure canning. Hot water bath is for fruits , jams , jellies. Presure is for vegies and meat , you must be very careful and attentive when using a presure canner. Theres things to know like the hybrid tomatoes now are less acid so they should either have vinigar added to them when canning in hot water bath or just pressure can them. Elevation is important , I live at 4000ft. so when using my presure canner I just do it at 15 lbs. pressure. Lower elevations say 10lbs. and depends on what you are canning. I have collected jars, lids, rings , hot water baths and presure cookers at yardsales and thriftstores. BUT you must inspect all of them very closely. Some people use mayonaise jars, I only use jars that are canning or made by the canning jar company( spagetti sauce jars are made by Ball). The best thing to do is get a realy good book. This summer find someone who has too much fruit on their trees or berries and just start playing with it. Canning your own food can realy be satisfying especially if you get the food for free . I hope I have been helpful Im new at this posting stuff.
 

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I gotta admit, even after reading your post a couple more times ... I'm still not exactly sure what your question is friend?
I probably could have been a little clearer, it was more a statement of discovering the world of canning goes beyond pressure and hot water caning of veggies, fish and meats. I was referring to buying dry goods in bulk and then oven dry canning in smaller containers to facilitate smaller quantities and storage.
 
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