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I was thinking about vacuum sealing ammo in bags of maybe about 500. I originally had the thought to buy some silica packs and throw one in each bag. It occurred to me though that I have a stash of free restaurant salt packets. Any thoughts on how well those would work on absorbing humidity? Or is either even necessary?
 

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I actually store my bulk ammo in 5 gal. buckets by putting the ammo in my food grade but used mylar bags, dropping in one or two 2000cc oxygen absorbers and sealing all but one corner and then using my wife's vacuum cleaner with the crevice tool to suck the bag closed and then heat sealing the open corner. I then use my rubber mallet to install the "O" ringed sealed lid on it. I label it as "hot rice", date it and store it with the rest of my grains and beans. I only store the bulk ammo that I do not ever intend to use unless SHTF this way. So far I have 800 rounds of general purpose 3" 12 gauge shells and about 1500 rounds of 9mm and much more 22 longs. God help us if our house catches on fire.
 

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C5GUY said:
God help us if our house catches on fire.
Funny you should say that. Hank's barn burned down like 5 years ago (that shed we hang out in) and he had all his ammo on a shelf in one, and when the one next door to it caught, it was full of four wheelers and gas can and the generator and the air compressor...YEAH let me be the first to say just get some popcorn. Firefighters showed up and just hid behind the engine until it burned itself out. There was explosions and flaming shit flyin around every time something went, and the ammo was like constant, steady stream of popping in there. Haha his mom will never live that one down. :lol:
 

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Leon said:
C5GUY said:
God help us if our house catches on fire.
Funny you should say that. Hank's barn burned down like 5 years ago (that shed we hang out in) and he had all his ammo on a shelf in one, and when the one next door to it caught, it was full of four wheelers and gas can and the generator and the air compressor...YEAH let me be the first to say just get some popcorn. Firefighters showed up and just hid behind the engine until it burned itself out. There was explosions and flaming shit flyin around every time something went, and the ammo was like constant, steady stream of popping in there. Haha his mom will never live that one down. :lol:
That had to be one hell of an impressive event to watch...from a long way off or behind a good barrier. Funny until we started posting about this I had never gave it a thought but now I am wondering WTF would happen if God forbid, our house did catch on fire? We are talking close to 5,000 rounds of ammo from 22 cal. up to 12 gauge 00 buck. I would not want to have any fireman or any one else close to this place if that ever happens.
 

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well, nobody got hurt thank god but the firefighters were laying down on the ground at points. We kept saying that you know, a bullet isn't as dangerous without a gun barrel to go through but they have protocol and yadda yadda, long story short now I keep mine in a secure spot in the crawlspace so it won't go with the house if ever mine should burn.
 

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This morning I just finished "canning"...as I call it...another 400 rounds of 12 gauge all purpose rounds as well as 1100 rounds of 22 cal. long rifle hollow points and 250 rounds of 9mm 115 grain full jacket rounds. I always label these buckets as "wild rice" and date them such as 9/9/2009 (9mm) or 2/22/2002 (22 cal) or 12/12/2012 (12 gauge).
 

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Now here's why I like using a BB gun for my target practice instead. The maintenance and storage of the gun and the ammo is bloody peaceful!! :D
 

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Ammo cans with silica gel/desiccant. This is what they were made for.
Make sure your cans have a good rubber seal.

I think salt would be a BIG mistake. I'm thinking lots of rust and corrosion.

A 50cal can hold 1000rd/9mm in boxes. Thats heavy, I wouldn't want to carry a 5gal bucket full very far.
And if i dropped it even a ft. off the floor it might bust. A metal can wouldn't.
 

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You can store ammo in one gallon paint cans that you can get from the hardware store. When people see an ammo can they think ammo. When they see paint cans they think paint. Just saying.
 

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Not sure salt would be a good idea. Whatever air is in that container would have some moisture and combined with the salt = rust. Maybe not right away, but if you're going to be storing (I imagine for a while) you might see some. Some desiccant will work and rice or kitty litter might even be a better option than salt.
 

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i was thinking about vacuum sealing ammo in bags of maybe about 500. I originally had the thought to buy some silica packs and throw one in each bag. It occurred to me though that i have a stash of free restaurant salt packets. Any thoughts on how well those would work on absorbing humidity? Or is either even necessary?
vacuuming is not needed. I could cause loss of bag integrity if using fmj.
What you need is a desiccant. You can use silica jell or freshly dried cat litter in bags made from coffee filters.
Get rid of the packaging it will contain moisture.
All my ammo is stored in 30 cal cans, 50 cal cans and 20 mm cans if not in its original gi crates.
 

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Not sure salt would be a good idea. Whatever air is in that container would have some moisture and combined with the salt = rust. Maybe not right away, but if you're going to be storing (I imagine for a while) you might see some. Some desiccant will work and rice or kitty litter might even be a better option than salt.
That was my initial thought but I am certainly no chemist so I was hoping someone else would bring the rust factor up. Thanks.
 

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i use the cilica packets i get from new purses and shoes. i also keep on behind the foam in my gun cases. should you be in a pinch use a bit of rice. makes sense as you ut a few grains of rice in with yer salt to keep it from sticking. the rice absorbs the moisure.
 

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i use the cilica packets i get from new purses and shoes. I also keep on behind the foam in my gun cases. Should you be in a pinch use a bit of rice. Makes sense as you ut a few grains of rice in with yer salt to keep it from sticking. The rice absorbs the moisure.
unless you dried out those silica packets before using them, they are useless.
They will only be effective in a hermetically sealed container, any air circulation will defeat them.
Open up one, look at the color, the darker the blue the more moisture it has absorbed. Put some of a package in an oven at180 deg for a half hour, remove and compare to the remainder you kept out, that will give you the idea.
 

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About 28 years ago when I first began to take an interest in firearms, and then survival related topics, I remember reading that desiccants should not be used when storing ammo...there is a small amount of moisture contained in primers, if a desiccant draws that moisture from the primer, the round will be no good.

In all of the surplus cases of military ammo that I've ever opened, I've never seen any desiccants used. If the military never saw fit to use desiccants to store their ammo, I see no reason why I should. Of course...excess moisture isn't much of a concern to me, since I live in Phoenix.

Tim
 

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Shiny new ammo cans that come with bulk ammo purchases, filled with a balanced assortment of our primary calibers. A fresh smear of clean grease on the rubber gasket.

For covert storage, vacuum sealed packets in used, "drippy" paint cans.
 

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About 28 years ago when I first began to take an interest in firearms, and then survival related topics, I remember reading that desiccants should not be used when storing ammo...there is a small amount of moisture contained in primers, if a desiccant draws that moisture from the primer, the round will be no good.

In all of the surplus cases of military ammo that I've ever opened, I've never seen any desiccants used. If the military never saw fit to use desiccants to store their ammo, I see no reason why I should. Of course...excess moisture isn't much of a concern to me, since I live in Phoenix.
Tim
military ammo such as m193, m855, m852 and m80 are sealed against moisture.
that is what the color on the primer is, a sealant. a small amount of coal tar seals the projectile.
there is no intended moisture content in the primers other than from atmosphere when manufactured.
 
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