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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got my bug out plan all figured out, me and my 12 year old brother will bug out to my grandparents farm about 30 miles out as soon as SHTF. Right now my parents think i'm crazy so it's really just me and him, the farms only about a 12 hour hike so I only plan on taking a small bag. This is what the bag will consist of so far, a 32 oz water bottle, Water treatment tablets, matches, a lighter, cotton balls, canteen, 4 Roman Noodles, 4 protein bars, 2 ponchos, 4 thermal blankets, para cord, duct tape, and a survival knife. This list seems pretty incomplete to me but I just can't pinpoint why. Give me your opinions what to I need to add or get rid of?
 

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I've got my bug out plan all figured out, me and my 12 year old brother will bug out to my grandparents farm about 30 miles out as soon as SHTF. Right now my parents think i'm crazy so it's really just me and him, the farms only about a 12 hour hike so I only plan on taking a small bag. This is what the bag will consist of so far, a 32 oz water bottle, Water treatment tablets, matches, a lighter, cotton balls, canteen, 4 Roman Noodles, 4 protein bars, 2 ponchos, 4 thermal blankets, para cord, duct tape, and a survival knife. This list seems pretty incomplete to me but I just can't pinpoint why. Give me your opinions what to I need to add or get rid of?
Every good plan can go bad just remember that. I'm a firm believer in a BOB being for a much longer term than you expect just in case. As long as you can carry it with reasonable effort and it doesn't hamper you getting to where you want to go. A few things to think of in what you're packing there are,: How are you gonna cook the Ramen noodles? What if water along the way is scarce or real dirty? You're not going to filter with tablets, just clean it a little from bacteria. You'd be better off with a good filter like a Katadyn. Your brother should have and be carrying his own water besides emergency supplies even at 12 for the trip. You never know if you'll get seperated. Those thermal blankets stink in my opinion. There light, but not as good as usgi poncho liner to me which is still pretty light. I'm not sure of your means to get set up though and that matters of course.

Fuzzee
 

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Kudo's to you for looking forward and being prepared. 30 Miles in Texas can be a good or bad thing depending on the time of the year. I would add a couple USGI Poncho Liners and at least one USGI Emergency Evac Blanket/Tarp to use as shelter, Toilet paper, a USGI Canteen Cup to heat your Ramien plus a Esbit Stove and fuel bars. See if you can't get a few MRE's (you can eat them cold) USGI Muffins, Corn Bread and some Chocolate, crackers from a restaurant, plastic fork and spoons, a larger folding pocket knife. More Water if you plan to walk, cook Ramiem and still drink....Sticky Rice will take less water than Ramien and afford you a little more nutrition, toss in some beef jerky chunks while it is cooking for flavor.

Karsten
 

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30 miles might not seem all that much, but they start adding up after the first few miles, especially if you're not used to it. I too recommend carrying more than you think you'll need for the trip. No telling how long you' could be delayed if you have to hole up to avoid detection, or if you get chased off your preplanned route. Heck, even something as simple as spraining your ankle could slow things down considerably.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the input yall, I came up with a new bag, Berkeley Portable Water Purifier, matches, a lighter, cotton balls, first aid kit, USGI poncho liner, camo tarps, ducktape, 100 ft of paracord, canteen cup, esbit pocket stove with fuel tablets, sticky rice, 2 mres, 4 protien bars, water flavoring packets, survival fishing kit, foldable shovel, survival knife, multi tool, toilet paper, hygiene supplies, and a couple good books. both me and my brother would be carrying one of these bags. We both participate in multiple sports in and out of school so with some training the hike wont be that big of a hurdle. I plan on starting some type of training program for both of us within the month, such as, running, hiking, fire starting, shelter building, etc.
 

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One of my recent adds is a tarp and a hammock. You can actually get a decent set at walmart. Both fold into attached pouches. It takes care of both shelter and bedding in a pinch depending on the season. I guess it depends on your location though. It makes sense for me being on the eastern sea board where trees are plentiful. It may not make as much sense in certain parts of Texas.

As far as destinations go, one thing I've done is picked out strategic points an the way to family owned property about 5 hours (by car) from where I live. God willing, I'll have access to motorized transportation to get closer and won't have to make that on foot. It would take weeks!
 

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Back to the ramen thing. You don't need water to eat it. But it offers little nutritional value. The good? Eat it dry, and you can take smaller portions. Once it expands in your belly it will make you feel full. The packets inside can be used to make broth. Broth, even cold broth, believe it or not can make you feel wonderful when you are starving. Feeling good is important. Sometimes it is better to feel good than be good. Surviving just to survive sucks.
 

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Thanks for all the input yall, I came up with a new bag, Berkeley Portable Water Purifier, matches, a lighter, cotton balls, first aid kit, USGI poncho liner, camo tarps, ducktape, 100 ft of paracord, canteen cup, esbit pocket stove with fuel tablets, sticky rice, 2 mres, 4 protien bars, water flavoring packets, survival fishing kit, foldable shovel, survival knife, multi tool, toilet paper, hygiene supplies, and a couple good books. both me and my brother would be carrying one of these bags. We both participate in multiple sports in and out of school so with some training the hike wont be that big of a hurdle. I plan on starting some type of training program for both of us within the month, such as, running, hiking, fire starting, shelter building, etc.
There's no reason to rush what you buy down to a few minute decision. Good research on the various items you want to pack can make a world of difference in what you end up with. Everything takes space, has weight and does a task. You want to get the most out of something you can with the least amount of weight and space which can leave you room for something else much needed and/or take weight of your back making the road easier. I love MRE's myself and have since the Army strangely enough. If you're not that used to them a lot of space and weight is saved simply by taking them down to there individual packets and tossing the extra cardboard packing and extra items you won't need for your BOB in a box to store at home for later. I pack about 9 days of food in my main BOB and than there's the bouillon cubes, peanut butter, spice mix and etc. to add to things I'll come across along the way like game and ground turf and surf. (bugs)

You might consider just how much your going to use the shovel seeing you list it. I've carried one for many miles and unless you're going to be digging big holes or supplimenting it for an axe it's a heavy item. You can use a stick to dig lots of basic holes for going the bathroom, finding water, food and so on. Or your knife which is one of the most important items to me. That Berkeley filter might not be better than a good Hiker Pro or MSR. Lighters and matches are great too, but it's always best to have a waterproof firestarter. If I could have just three things being dropped from a plane (parachute included of course)in the jungle, a firestarter, 5 inch combo edge fixed blade and canteen cup would be it. Thankfully I can pack more in a prepared BOB though and hopefully not be without it when the shtf.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias=aps&field-keywords=katadyn water filter

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...11&h=1ad973943418a3eaee6ca1bf986c1e23b26e927e
 

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I would suggest, if you plan to hike that far, that you buy some moleskin, because you are going to get blisters before you are done, for sure. Spare socks -- if your shoes/boots get wet, you blister faster with wet socks. You have to take care of your feet if you are hoofing it, period. I hike a lot, and if your feet get injured with miles to walk, you are in for a very bad day.

You need to figure on carrying more water than you have indicated, too, I believe. Some NSAIDs like Aleve or Motrin would be smart -- in case you twist an ankle or tweak a knee. A quality firearm with spare ammo, a multi-tool, and a good knife are must haves. Flashlight and spare batteries -- in case you get delayed and it gets dark. Beef jerky sustains you for a long hike. Bug repellent and suntan lotion would be wise. Gloves for everyone. Bandannas for sweatbands, improvised dust mask, makeshift sling or bandage, etc. And a good compass, just in case.
 
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