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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone else getting concerned about the seas? Fish and mammals are dying off, getting sick, open sores, and starfish dying.

Odd thing about this is, the starfish that are in aquariums supplied with seawater are dying, just like the fish in the sea. In other words, the cause for the mass death is in the water and not due to contact.

It seems the Pacific is very ill. Already, I don't trust the Gulf, due to the oil/Corexit coctail.

The noose is tightening on us.

Mystery Disease Killing Off Starfish, Santa Cruz Researchers are Puzzled | Local News - Central Coast News KION/KCBA

If this has already been covered, my apologies.
 

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next a report from India, saying they are fighting the undead :D

the world is changing, maybe the Mayan calender was right, and that date was the start of things to come, or we have ****ed the planet so much, its trying to cone up with ways to warn us before she decides to kill us ....

or the starfish are just dying off, for natural reasons... but I bet there will be no action taken
 

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I've been working up some long pork recipes when the other meat sources run dry. After all, I'm no vegan.
 

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We know that genetically cloned animals like Dolly the Sheep have shorter lifespans. It seems that even though you clone a new animal or organism, the DNA that makes up that organism has a shelf life. Take St. Augustine grass commonly found in the Southern areas of America - it will provide a lush and vibrant yard for about 15 to 20 years and then becomes "tired" and starts dying off.

Now having compared Dolly and St. Augustine grass - both reproduced asexually with out the interjection of new DNA, look at some of the animals you are concerned about. Unless I'm mistaken, Starfish reproduce asexually as well by cloning themselves. It is possible that the starfish DNA is getting old - or maybe it has to do with the magnetic core of the Earth or something like that.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
We know that genetically cloned animals like Dolly the Sheep have shorter lifespans. It seems that even though you clone a new animal or organism, the DNA that makes up that organism has a shelf life. Take St. Augustine grass commonly found in the Southern areas of America - it will provide a lush and vibrant yard for about 15 to 20 years and then becomes "tired" and starts dying off.

Now having compared Dolly and St. Augustine grass - both reproduced asexually with out the interjection of new DNA, look at some of the animals you are concerned about. Unless I'm mistaken, Starfish reproduce asexually as well by cloning themselves. It is possible that the starfish DNA is getting old - or maybe it has to do with the magnetic core of the Earth or something like that.
Most starfish reproduce the old fashioned way, although they don't have visible organs. These critters have been around for a good long time; I wouldn't think this is a case of DNA gone naturally bad. After all, we're looking at a mass die off, as if something tripped a trigger.

Arizona Infidel, they are saying they don't believe it is radiation, as they haven't detected its presence in the starfish, or in the water, but even in the aquariums that use seawater pumped straight into the tanks, the starfish are melting and withering away.

The syndrome, as the call it, is spreading to more species of the starfish - at least five, now.

More sea star species dying off | KING5.com Seattle
 

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I saw this a while back and believe that its a sign of bad things happening in our oceans.the starfish,dolphins and orcas beaching themselves and getting lost into rivers (people say), there must be a reason they want to get away from some chemical or something ,mass die offs of other saltwater species etc,it has to be us doing it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Nothing happens apart from the will of God. Does he have any reason to be unhappy?
That is a good question. Is what we are seeing another part of judgement against our rebellion, or is this the natural consequence to our not being good stewards of the land (and sea, of course), or is this part of the insidious plan to starve and subjugate humanity? Or could it be, as GT suggested, a case of the starfish's time on earth coming to an end? If that be the case, what is going to restore balance to the ecosystem, if that balance is to be restored at all?

It seems to me our food supplies are being poisoned or destroyed, all together. Not that we eat starfish, but they are a part of that food chain and are also an health indicator of it.
 

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It looks like their populations increased drastically a few years ago, disease usually follows over population. Not sure it has anything to do with mankind at all, might just be nature taking its course.
 
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Starfish reproduce sexually, unless forced to regenerate, in which case, you can cut a starfish in half, and it will grow into two starfish. Normally, they use a combination of DNA from two starfish to create a new brood. (notice I didn't say boys and girls, as most species of starfish contain both male and female gonads.)

Starfish are also considered a "sentinel species" due to their place in the food web, much the same way frogs are a sentinel species of the tropical forests. Scientists try to predict what can happen to an entire ecosystem based on telling symptoms of certain organisms. Generally speaking, a problem with a sentinel species is cause for alarm, and could mean more problems further down, and up, the food chain.

In an ecosystem as vast and complex as the oceans, which by the way provide about 60% of the food that humans consume, this could mean very bad things.
 
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