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One fellow poster noted their families history to the contintental army in the American revolution, and it reminds me of my families history. Its a good one, but its started not so good.
My ancestor, in his very early 20's, was given charge of a British frigate in the royal navy at the beginning of the revolutionary war. The little twerp fought on the wrong side. He
found his battle group seriously outgunned and true to British form his commanders got him and his frigate to "hold the line" while they ran for it. My ancestor was captured and
imprisoned by several well known Naval hero's of our Revolution.

While I'm sure there was debate on how my ancestor was to be executed for his crimes against the Revolution and the contintental navy a ship commander argued to the leaders he
should be turned and brought into their fold. He was after all born in America and they were better off with him then seeing him executed. He agreed (duh) and was soon given
command of a contintental ship. Now my ancestor had a nack for battles he couldn't win. It was reported while holding the line against the contintental navy in the first battle his
little frigate sunk two of the good guys ships, and now a year later in another battle his continental ship sunk 4 of her majesties royal war ships - unfortunately there were 5 and
he was captured - again.

He was actually 2nd in command when captured and his captain was the same man who argued for his release earlier. He managed to escape being captured. I get the sense my
ancestor was use to being left behind for these ventures? Anyway they didn't executive him, the Brits, but decided to ship him back to England to answer for his crimes. Why I
have no idea. However in England he managed to escape - lucky dude and make it to France and then return to America. A few years after the revolution finally ended he managed
to work with the guy who got him off and helped him join the continental navy. It would be a really cool part to tell you the two of them were instrumental in forming the Naval
Academy. That is true. It would be the really cool part, except there is a much more cool story to all of this. You see the man who rescued him when he was being tried for
fighting for the Brits, the guy he saved before getting captured by the Brits, the guy he later joined up with to help create the Navy Academy and the American navy - yeah that
guy is an ancestor of my wifes; and neither of us knew until we studied our geneology.
 

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One fellow poster noted their families history to the contintental army in the American revolution, and it reminds me of my families history. Its a good one, but its started not so good.
My ancestor, in his very early 20's, was given charge of a British frigate in the royal navy at the beginning of the revolutionary war. The little twerp fought on the wrong side. He
found his battle group seriously outgunned and true to British form his commanders got him and his frigate to "hold the line" while they ran for it. My ancestor was captured and
imprisoned by several well known Naval hero's of our Revolution.

While I'm sure there was debate on how my ancestor was to be executed for his crimes against the Revolution and the contintental navy a ship commander argued to the leaders he
should be turned and brought into their fold. He was after all born in America and they were better off with him then seeing him executed. He agreed (duh) and was soon given
command of a contintental ship. Now my ancestor had a nack for battles he couldn't win. It was reported while holding the line against the contintental navy in the first battle his
little frigate sunk two of the good guys ships, and now a year later in another battle his continental ship sunk 4 of her majesties royal war ships - unfortunately there were 5 and
he was captured - again.

He was actually 2nd in command when captured and his captain was the same man who argued for his release earlier. He managed to escape being captured. I get the sense my
ancestor was use to being left behind for these ventures? Anyway they didn't executive him, the Brits, but decided to ship him back to England to answer for his crimes. Why I
have no idea. However in England he managed to escape - lucky dude and make it to France and then return to America. A few years after the revolution finally ended he managed
to work with the guy who got him off and helped him join the continental navy. It would be a really cool part to tell you the two of them were instrumental in forming the Naval
Academy. That is true. It would be the really cool part, except there is a much more cool story to all of this. You see the man who rescued him when he was being tried for
fighting for the Brits, the guy he saved before getting captured by the Brits, the guy he later joined up with to help create the Navy Academy and the American navy - yeah that
guy is an ancestor of my wifes; and neither of us knew until we studied our geneology.
Man I really enjoyed reading your family story! You know the old saying, "Truth is stranger than fiction"
 

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That's an interesting story. I only know the names of my ancestors that fought in the war. I love to watch the movie The Patriot, because, my ancestors fought with the South Carolina militia. They were likely the group that fired one shot and ran. I believe the battle where they used that tactic was Cowpens? The SC Militia was smart enough to use Native American fighting techniques and they were guerilla fighters. Gen. Nathanael Greene shares a grandparent with my 5th great grandmother, Olivia Greene. The first of my ancestors arrived in the New World in 1611. If you really like genealogy, I suggest doing 23andme. You may learn some very interesting things about your history thru genetics. I did. It's only $99. You also get a genetic medical history, which can be invaluable when it comes to drug treatments, and even diagnosing ailments you may have.
 

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So, what you are saying is that, "thar ain't no branches in your famly tree" , does that more or less put it into perspective? :)
Ok, the two guys weren't related and it has been several generation between then and now but it just started to sound like second cousins and " my mother is my sister" sort of thing. Just giving you a hard time - all in fun.

Besides, my son married a gal whose mother's maiden name was the same as mine - if we are related (other than as inlaws) is not born out in our recent geneology. I always say that we don't have any branches in our family tree either but then my daughter married a Mexican American so it is real hard to justify the no branches thing.
 

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If you come from any isolated populations, (and the founders of our country were isolated) you do get some of that. Actually second cousin marriages are quite common historically, because it was a way to keep land and assets in the family. To answer your delicate inquiry, I am slightly more related to my paternal cousin than is expected for first cousins, which means, that yes, there was some restricted DNA coming down. 12% of shared DNA is typical, ours is 14.9% It's called a Founder Effect.
 

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I guess I should get my son and daughter-in-law DNA checked - no, it doesn't matter because he has three kids from a previous .. er.. relationship and she was done after having her first and only before they met.
My ancestors came over on the Mayflower but between then and now we have spread out quite a bit and I doubt the "shared DNA" is more than average - although I am guessing.
 
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