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Bugging out WILL get you killed

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Comfortable would not be what you're talking about. To me, comfortable is a Hilton room. I guess you're asking could I handle being alone in a strange place where strange noises will keep me awake most of the night while I shiver because I'm not prepared to be there for more than 3 nights. Of course not, that's why a put together a BOB to make such a stay bearable. Even as a Boy Scout, I had my fellow scouts to keep the bogey man away. But yes, I could do it in SHTF incident.
 

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I voted to agree but my opinion is that people who are not mentally, physically, and supplies ready could easily get dead by bugging out when there are crazies running around. I quickly learned in Vietnam that even trained folks tend to get confused and do stupid things when under attack. The typical civilian is nowhere near ready to bug out AND encounter others who mean to do them harm.

As far as staying in the woods is concerned, I think anyone can live in the woods for a few nights but it takes training and other prep. to live in the deep woods for weeks at a time.

Our little mutual assistance group has no intention of bugging anywhere if TSHTF. We're well fortified and well stocked to support our three families for 18 months easily. And we have plans for much longer if needed.
 

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Maybe I should watch the video, but 14 minutes scares me... three days should be pretty easy, 3 months I could see becoming a little lengthy alone.
 

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While I know the possibility of a bug out is possible, IMHO I figured the odds (in my old house 40 miles west of Chicago) were only 1 in 4 that I would bug out. Now I have to re-evaluate everything.
 

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I once said I have a bug out box not a bag, I would load up an off road vehicle and possible a trailer also. I have backpacked and did a lot of camping and yes the man is right it would be hard to carry enough on your back for a long time. But planed right would be no problem for a month or two with a fully loaded vehicle but even then you need to put more emphasis on food then most people think they will need.
 

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I disagreed but there are some mitigating circumstances there.

1st is when. If you can get out quickly in the beginning and stay off the main roads, you should be ok. It would seem to me the longer you wait, the harder it will be. If you can hold out until things settle down, you may still have a decent chance to bug out.

2nd is what. What caused this and how will it affect your area.

Me, I'm staying here until there is no other alternative. The only place I can think of to go is roughly 1200 miles from here.
 

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What am I agreeing or disagreeing with? The title of the thread? The lisps guys video? As it pertains to me? Other people? What time frame are we talking about? To many questions to answer the poll right now.
 

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I'm getting to old and tired to be running through the woods any more. Hopefully I'll have enough ammo and food to weather the storm or I'll take as many as I can with me. I've already drawn my line in the sand.
 

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What am I agreeing or disagreeing with? The title of the thread? The lisps guys video? As it pertains to me? Other people? What time frame are we talking about? To many questions to answer the poll right now.
haha, Yes too many variables I agree. Bugging in will get you killed depending on your location & scenario. Are you 24yr old physically & mentally fit military guy or a 54yr male with arthritis and a heart condition or any area in between?

I would say yes, bugging out might get you killed, but what's that matter when staying put is just as bad? Seems like a leading / biased question.
 

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I diasagreed with the title. I agree with what Killswitch posted.

Whether I bug in or bug out will depend on what the problem is and why the S is hitting TF. If its severe and long term then I am bugging out as my BOL is more sustainable than my current residence and has a lot more supplies. Otherwise I will remain in place as long as that is feasible to do. My BOL is not that far away and I can make that walk under the cover of darkness in a couple of nights easy like. I would rather get there by driving as I could get there with more stuff to bolster my supplies than I could with just my BOB though. Having been a very active Boy Scout, the military for 21 years, a hunter and avid outdoorsman, I don't think I would be all that uncomfortable at all. That's not saying that life would not be a lot more demanding physically though as I would go about making it through a post SHTF day.
 

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Each situation is different. I could not agree or disagree.
I know in our case each of us has plans to Bug out from where ever we are and get to where we need to be.
If for some reason it took me 3 days to get back I would be just fine.
Once those that belong here are here the bugging out is over it is lock down time.
 

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We all know that bugging out is determined by individual or family circumstances, and whether the situation that confronts you will drive you out of the safety of your usual dwelling place. Facing a Cat 5 hurricane you would be insane to bug in - you will die if you don't evacuate. No doubt.

It is also true that most people (sheeple as we refer to them) will not last two nights in the woods. There are a number of hardy people ("country folks") who will manage just fine (some of them live in the deep woods already) and then there are others ("city people") who will not make it even one night.

I go primitive camping three times a year...no water, electricity or toilet. Pack in your own supplies. It is very hard work getting to your base camp and getting set up, but once you do, if you have the right gear and mindset, you can manage just fine, and if you like to do this, will totally enjoy yourself. I love that first cup of coffee fresh off a campfire as the sun rises over a morning mist shrouded lake, but I brought the right stuff so I get to sleep in a tent on the ground all night without freezing or becoming bear bait. I know how to hunt, fish, survive and live off the land. So does my wife. But most people I know won't make it past the first night. They are not hardy enough, let's face the truth....

We know what we are doing, we do it for adventure and fun, and we also know it would be the last choice if we had to do so. Living outdoors exposed to the elements is hard and the brutal reality is that you can die if you are unprepared and lack the skills and gear it takes to survive.

Most people will fail because of one reason - they lack the discipline, drive and determination it takes to make it. They will quit and give up after about the fourth or fifth hardship or setback occurs. They will not get killed necessarily, but they will come streaming out of the woods in droves after they experience the insects, snakes, scorpions, weather, and scarcity of resources. You will find them all along the roads, all wanting to do anything EXCEPT go back in the deep woods after dark....

Why? Because they lack mental toughness, and because they are physically soft.

To survive in the woods, you have to be tougher than the conditions. You have to like roughing it.

Or as my military friends that roll with me when I hike or hunt, you have to "embrace the suck."

You have to LIKE IT when the going gets tough. You have to WANT to rise to the challenge.

And you have to have survival gear, or you will NOT survive, period.

Man is the most domesticated of all the animals. We lack fur (well, most of us anyway); we don't have claws; and our fangs are limited to four teeth out of 32 (if you have all your teeth). We live in shelters because we HAVE to.

But if you bug out to the right place, a well positioned bug out location, you not only will NOT die, you may greatly enhance and increase your chances of survival.

To suggest otherwise is the result of a lack of understanding and a lack of advance planning.

So, I disagree with the premise bugging out WILL kill you. That is the thinking of an under-informed and uninitiated knucklehead.

Embrace the suck. Plan ahead. Gather your preps. And face the SHTF situations ready and unafraid.

Wussies need not apply....
 

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I agree and disagree at the same time. For everyone is simple not capable of surviving in the wilderness for a long period of time. It's natures way and it's tough. Some people really are just too soft and can't mentally handle the hardship. They won't be able to deal with the cold and the heat, the bugs, snakes and animals, do what needs to be done and eaten while at the same time making sure you don't waste your energy on something that will not provide you with a beneficial gain worth the effort. Lots of people are just kidding themselves.

Than there's the other side of people who know how tough it is and aren't going to wimper about how cold it is and how much work it is to survive. How dangerous it is and how tough it is to find food. and will eat things that most people will simply shake their head at because it's not a McDonalds hamburger. They know this having been there and know crying about it isn't going to change shit. This guy in the video makes a lot of presumptions based on a particular viewpoint of what people's experience and background are. What their going to bring and not and that they don't know what their getting into. He's right in part as some people are exactly like that and should definitely not bugout. They'll die no ways about it. But people are going to die anyways when shtf hard enough that people have to bugout and resort to trying to survive in a wilderness area because society has collapsed or it's gotten so dangerous because of occupying police/military forces that they had no choice but to.

Having to, is a very important aspect, because if you bugout and go to the wilderness trying to survive because a hurricane came you're a moron. This guy for as much as I don't like him in attitude, character and outlook, that I'd surely put my knife into his throat and chest quietly in the night and sink him down the river with a rock in his belly tied up with his jacket, is right that unless there is a societal collapse or major reason to bug out in that sense when there are so many other modern choices, it's just plain stupid to put yourself in the hardship that surviving in the wilderness is without good reason.



:redboxesoncart:
 

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three days should be pretty easy, 3 months I could see becoming a little lengthy alone.
It would be the opposite for me. 3 days would be tough buy after 3 months unless I was on the run or hurt. I would have improved my situation. Not sure if I would have running water by then but definitely worm, dry and a comfortable place to sleep.
 

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I don't view bugging out as running into the woods. I view it as changing your "bugging in" location.

Example. I'm currently just finishing up grad school and live probably 3 miles away from a rather large city in VA. If I bug in here, I've got 2 handguns with me and about a month worth of food and that's about it. I'm also rather nomadic right now as I really only HAVE to be here 3 out of the next 4 months... the remaining time I won't be tied down to this apartment and will likely spend time in PA with my immediate family. Until graduation in may, I will spend time in southern VA, northern VA, central PA, and the Atlantic coast of Florida, so I'm a bit hindered in what I can prepare in my home...

While I don't officially own my own BOL yet (close on it next summer), my family owns a cabin across the street. If anything massive ever happened on the east coast, that's where everyone would be headed anyways.

Does bugging in really make sense for me right now? Sometimes yes... Probably not to the extent that some preppers are... I'm likely sufficient for about 4-6 weeks... But in an apartment complex 3 miles from town, I'm sure there is a scenario where I may need to bug out either temporarily or permanently to head closer to family. As a prepper, my duty is to be prepared for either situation.

I'll probably wind up settling down in PA somewhere between 0 (ideally) and 100 miles from my BOL, which makes my entire disagreement here a moot point. I'll likely do as you said and start the gardening and such then when I settle down after finishing up in May.

But in general I agree that in SHTF, our goal should be to thrive and not survive... Just some of us live 500 miles away from that "self sustaining, close knit community" we have or could readily create and contribute to.
 

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I go primitive camping three times a year...no water, electricity or toilet. Pack in your own supplies. It is very hard work getting to your base camp and getting set up, but once you do, if you have the right gear and mindset, you can manage just fine, and if you like to do this, will totally enjoy yourself. I love that first cup of coffee fresh off a campfire as the sun rises over a morning mist shrouded lake, but I brought the right stuff so I get to sleep in a tent on the ground all night without freezing or becoming bear bait. I know how to hunt, fish, survive and live off the land. So does my wife. But most people I know won't make it past the first night. They are not hardy enough, let's face the truth....
This (especially that cup of mildly groundy cowboy coffee), and...

We know what we are doing, we do it for adventure and fun, and we also know it would be the last choice if we had to do so. Living outdoors exposed to the elements is hard and the brutal reality is that you can die if you are unprepared and lack the skills and gear it takes to survive.
This.
 
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