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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you are looking for a good all-purpose knife and don't want to spend a small fortune, you might want to consider the Schrade SCHF9 Extreme Survival Knife. For less than $50, this knife is hard to beat.

I'm not a "knife guy." I don't own 200 blades, but I have never owned a stainless steel blade that would hold an edge well. Yeah, there may be some out there, but this knife's 1095 high carbon steel blade is about ideal for my intended use.

I'm also a "minimalist" and prefer to travel fast and light. I needed a knife that would replace a machete, hatchet, and entrenching tool, and also do all those things a knife is supposed to do. This knife weighs a pound, and has a 1/4" thick blade. At about 12" overall, it's not a small or light blade, but it is much lighter than carrying all those other tools, so it's weight well spent in my book. (I won't be carrying any back-up blades)

The blade seems well designed and is coated with a tough coating that should prevent rust. This knife uses full tang construction and has jinking along the top for a proper knife-fighting grip should that need arise. The very edge is exposed, but minimal care will keep it from rusting. The handle fits my hand well, and is a fairly grippy, well textured Kraton material.

The sheath is ballistic nylon and features a removable external pocket and a hard plastic liner. I like the belt attachment because the loop closes with Velcro so you don't have to take your belt off to attach it. The knife stay is a snap, which I like, and the fit can be adjusted via Velcro. The sheath also features a leg tie, which I cut off and replaced with paracord.

I added a Smith's PP1 Pocket Pal Multifunction Sharpener ($7) and Magnesium Fire Starter by SE ($4.50) and they both fit into the pouch with room to spare.

Anyone looking for a high value blade for general bushcraft and survival would be well served by this knife.

Amazon: Schrade SCHF9
 

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Let us know how you like that sharpener after you use it for a year, OK?

I prefer a nice ceramic rod type sharpener - they don't wear out and they are easy to clean. I have some diamond stones but I rarely use them anymore.
 

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I own a smiths sharpener. Like it a lot. Just a basic 2 stage sharpener but for field work it is sufficient. It won't get your blade quite razor sharp but will do for basic bushcraft work.

Its tiny too. Takes up no space or weight in my bag. Highly recommended. Cost is minimal.
 

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I saw these and think they should be a very good knife for the money given the materials and that Sharade, (having had many and still do) makes a generally good knife. 1095 is used heavily by even your high end knife makers because it's a very good carbon steel that when done right in heat treatment holds a great edge and takes one easily. I prefer micarta or G10 for the handle material, but that often cost more money and Kraton is good as long as you don't expose it to too much heat where it melts. The sheath as long as it's sewn well, should last a lifetime. I think this is an excellent alternative to a KaBar and the blade shape looks very useable for plenty of tasks.
 

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Anyone know where Schrades are made these days? I know the American company went belly up years ago.
I have two old American made Schrades - an Uncle Henry Bear Paw folder (stainless SCHRADE+ steel) and a fixed blade hunter(carbon). I get the Kennesaw knife catalog and was thinking about getting a Schrade pocket knife. I also like the Kissing Crane knives I get from Kennesaw, they're made in China but are high quality considering.
 

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RPD - Mine was made in Taiwan, sad to say, the sheath and box from China.
I bought a Buck fixed blade (I already had a 119 Hunter and a 110 folder) as a knock around work knife. The blade has Taiwan stamped on it. It's good steel, and at least Taiwan is non-communist and an ally of the US.
I have several Kissing Crane pocket knives and they are made in China but seem to have better steel than generic 440 stainless. Even the blade stampings are better than a plain "China", got the K.C. logo too. If the Schrades are similar quality they would be OK.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Interesting. My Buck 119 has "USA" stamped on the blade. I've had mine a long time, maybe 20 years?

I'm really happy with the new Schrade so far, but haven't really stressed it yet. I won't be batoning with it because I just don't see the point. I also don't plan on chopping down trees with it. I scout for deadfall for my fires. Anything under 6" or so gets thrown on as is. Anything bigger gets left where it is. I'm not looking to cause myself extra work, yanno?
 

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Interesting. My Buck 119 has "USA" stamped on the blade. I've had mine a long time, maybe 20 years?

I'm really happy with the new Schrade so far, but haven't really stressed it yet. I won't be batoning with it because I just don't see the point. I also don't plan on chopping down trees with it. I scout for deadfall for my fires. Anything under 6" or so gets thrown on as is. Anything bigger gets left where it is. I'm not looking to cause myself extra work, yanno?
Most of the time you don't need to baton when there's good dry wood around and tinder. Sometimes when it's been raining you have too. Doesn't mean a person has to look for huge logs to baton like some of these guys seem too. Even a Mora can baton regular branches just fine and scrap them for tinder afterwards.
 

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Interesting. My Buck 119 has "USA" stamped on the blade. I've had mine a long time, maybe 20 years?
My 119 and 110 are both American which is why I really didn't look too close at the packaging of the Taiwan made one (it's at home right now so I don't know the model number). I bought it at K-Mart about five years ago and it was about $35 if I remember right.
I wear sheath knives as back up to my pocket pistol. At work, a folder in a belt pouch.
Long ago and far away I learned it's better to have a weapon and not need it, than to need a weapon and not have one. Since 1970 I have always had at least a Buck or a Schrade hunting folder on my belt at all times. Plus a pocket knife, of course.
 

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I learned it's better to have a weapon and not need it, than to need a weapon and not have one.

I've been doing the same thing. I have lots of polishing stones and items made to put a perfect angle on expensive knives. Of course, I don't usually use a perfect knife with a superior edge--the perfection takes a very long time! Then again, you could doze off watching me sharpen a favorite knife. The worst thing I ever did was to buy a large loupe and check out all of my stone's markings and my hand's foolishness.

But I will admit this. The first time I did "everything right" in polishing an edge I just about scared myself! I'd even like to try my hand at refining a tool for balsa wood. I've never made a balsa made toy airplane in an attempt to float it on the air...
 

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Back in the mid 1990's I could see most of the knife industry moving to China so I bought a bunch of USA knives. Some Puma production moved to China. I know China is making some good knives but erratic quality control, the next knife off the assembly line is crap, not to mention China bootleg knives. I have Buck, Schrade, Western, Gerber, Victorinox, Puma, Rapala, K-Bar. Still keep an eye out for quality USA knives. A quality knife deserves a good sharpering system, I use Lansky. Don't waste my time on China junk.
 

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A quality knife deserves a good sharpening system, I use Lansky.

As with any system, make sure you flip the knife over several times. In fact, I still use a wide, black magic marker.

Just because a knife "is sharp" does not mean that each side is parallel with the other. I've seen knife edges that are 20 degrees on one side and less than ten on the other.
 
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