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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
okay so you made it... youve gotten into the wilderness. you are bug out king/queen...

how do you identify and avoid becoming prey to bear, mountain lions, snake bite ect..
and for which lanscape.

I was in the sequoias and came right up on a baby bear. smelled it about 20 feet away- i didnt see mother.
snapped a few photos as i made ground in a hurry to get away.



then same trail 5 minutes later smelled this ole boy and looked around.
he was about 20 feet above me. i didnt see him till i wa right under him...no mom that i could see... kept moving.



Im not so concerned with wolves as they only live in sanctuaries here.
id put big money on the wolves in this area recognizing me. i am a big supporter of the wolf and visit the 3 places regulary.
theres quite a few big cat sanctuaries, can you imagine if they were loosed? yikes!
the big cats, no, theyd tear my ass up. they dont care about me visiting or being a supporter.
but what about in your area?



any wild animal safety we should learn and know now? chance favors the prepared mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
i know it bothered me the whole trip. I thought that i really need to be more aware. because there were other people on the trail i let my guard down
. i think i relied subconciously on collective situational awareness.

the yr before i ran into an adult black bear. same place- but it wasnt interested in me. still made my heart thump!
 

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i know it bothered me the whole trip. I thought that i really need to be more aware. because there were other people on the trail i let my guard down
. i think i relied subconciously on collective situational awareness.

Last year I ran into an adult black bear. same place- but it wasnt interested in me. still made my heart thump!
Astute observation- they say there's no wolves OR cougar in Georgia. That's bunk because in one of my older videos I show on camera what are clearly the tracks of a wide-pawed dog of no less than 150 pounds. It was near garbage cans at a public canoe launch. It was indeed wolf tracks, I know them from growing up in the northern US. Not maybe 150 yards from a major four lane road. Then the cougars? Glockwork9 and me went up to film those shooting videos at his mother's house. She complained to us about two cougars eating her numerous cats, I asked her how big they were thinking maybe they were cannibal linx or wildcat. She told us very clearly that they were all beige and the size of lions. The area is obvious big cat friendly with its abundance of deer and wildlife. That's BS, there are indeed cougars all over the southeast despite PETA declaring them extinct. I have never run into one, but then again I have never run into my house-cat Alfie outside the studio. ALL cats act the same, big or small. They are definitely here- along with killer bees, wild hogs, badgers, wild feral dogs, wild goats, feral horses, feral BOA CONSTRICTORS! (you heard of that one yet?) Yeah, they are all right here. I have even seen coyotes in my neighborhood in growing numbers. Owls hound my back yard. It's a jungle out there, even in the concrete confines of a metro area.

Keep them eyes open, shotlady
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
heck ya, mayhaps some one thought itd be cool to have one as a pet, wolves and big cats and realize these are not pets and loose them
. they are alpha predaters.
as you noticed i said the wolves local would recognize me, not that theyd not regroup and get me. in a cage i am alert with them,
but if they were returned to the wild thier instincts would have to kick in for them to live.

coyotes scare me more than a wolf does. them are some bad ass little animals.

theres all sorts of stuff that "they" claim dont exist in an area, but they do. as humans bring them in with pet grandure.

havelinas wild pigs are very dangerous. I had one tree me when i was out riding in texas i was about 11. i got treed and had to loose my horse for it to have a chance to live/get away.
you gotta shoot them damn things on sight.
 

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One time when I was like ten, I was always a big-bore shooter carrying a heavy Remington 3600 rifle in 30-06 semi-auto. I was out hunting the Wisconsin deer season opener with my uncle. I stopped to warm my hands with my hobo stove, got it running and set it on this old car that was abandoned long ago, it was a 50 mercury sedan or something like it. I got all comfy, warmed my little hands up and looked around when I spotted a big wolverine looking at me from maybe 50 yards away. I got a lump in my throat and started walking away, my little can stove still burning on the car. I then heard this horrible angry growl. Shit went south from there.

The damn thing all of a sudden burst into a run at me, so I grabbed my gun and fired off a few shots. Didn't even make it flinch. It kept on charging and stopping at me to scare me, and it DID scare the living hell out of me. I got so scared in fact that I shook when I raised that heavy gun at it. Shot twice more at the wolf-sized critter and one shot clipped it on the forelimb. Damn thing freaked out and went on a rampage so scary I ran to the car, went inside and hid there while holding the door shut. I was crying a bit when it finally inspected me and moved on. I had another magazine in my pocket but that never came into play, never even thought of it in the haze. Not through that terror. I didn't even THINK of leaving that car till my uncles showed up looking for me. It was warmer in there than outside, and that damn thing was lurking about in those silent woods. That was my first ever encounter with the wild side if life and I'll never forget it. My second was when my mom thought it would be funny to throw gravel at alligators till they got pissed enough to chase us up the channels in southern Louisiana and corner us at her little 1980 Celica. That was a similar deal until she started the car and ran like five of them over in the parking lot. Later that week me and my older cousin went out to that same spot and dropped big hunks of concrete onto them from the overpass while they sunned in the channel, killed like ten of them with falling rubble. That was my first run-in with cops, coincidentally.
 

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We don't see many Wolverine here in Michigan , only at U-M. We have Cougar in the woods and clubs,black bear in the garbage, not a lot but enough to keep you on edge.
 

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The part of Michigan I live our most dangerous animal would be a coyote or pack of wild dogs. I here there are wild boar but lived in this house 33 years and never seen nor heard one ever. Only non poisonous snakes.
 

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Yeah you Americans/Canadians have a lot of nasty critters to put up with, I hear there are even mountain lions jumping on mountain bikers!
Here in Britain the only nasty things are adders, they bite about 100 people a year but usually it just stings a bit with no ill effects.
Since records began in 1876 there have only been 14 reported deaths caused by adder bites, with the last death a 5-year-old child in 1975.
One couldn't slither into my tent at night if I keep the bug mesh zipped, but I'd have to be careful when climbing out next morning..

 

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The part of Michigan I live our most dangerous animal would be a coyote or pack of wild dogs. I here there are wild boar but lived in this house 33 years and never seen nor heard one ever. Only non poisonous snakes.
Feral pigs are 20 miles away and are in season year round with any license. A few years ago some coyote(s) answered my buck grunt call while MuzzleLoading, I shot the one closest to me and waved my shiny Bowie knife at the rest. It was close to the end of shooting hours and it was spooky. Now I have night sights on my Glock and a CPL.

Thanks for reminding me of all the BS stuff that's out in the woods, which starts 30 yards from where I'm typing this.

FMJ works good on feral critters. SSS
 

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I forgot to add, that I have a family of Massasauga Rattlesnakes in my shooting berm 33 yards from the computer, they must be feeding on the Southern Brown Wood Roaches.

The snakes are small and only kill the old and weak, but Mom is old and I'm not far behind. I'm just careful when putting out the targets

Heck I'm not even "Up North", since I'm 18 miles below the Saginaw line dividing the Northern and Southern Lower Penisula.

We`also have at least some Wolf/Dog mixes running around since the neighbors Wolf got loose and never came home, I'm sure"He" survived and is doing well as the Alpha Male of the feral dog pack.
 

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In this area of North Florida/South Georgia we don't have much to worry about. Black bears are around but seldom seen. Coyotes, of course. There are only 4 different venemous snakes to watch for. Oh, and alligators.:smile:
Wild hogs. Hunters who are so incompetant they shoot at anything they hear moving in the brush. (Idiots)
 

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Maine is really too cold to sustain very much in terms of poisonous wildlife. We do, however, have the rare mountain lion, black bear, or moose. A lot of those species have been driven to near extinction though through deforestation and developments being put up.

In certain SHTF situations, I think people need to realize that some of the more rare and dangerous species may suddenly make a comeback. Say the flu wipes out 90% of the people on the planet. Animals will suddenly have their habitats back and less people to contend with. Something to consider if the real thing happens.
 

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Very good topic, and something people need to consider before they strike off into the woods.

Spiders. It is a very good idea to be aware of what is a threat and what is not. You have to be able to identify these little buggers and know where to find them. Suffer a brown recluse bite when there is no hospital to help you and you will find your world filled with much suckage!

Spider Identification Chart - Venomous or Dangerous?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
thank you for the spider chart, denton. now i want to burn my computer! hahaha



i wonder if theres a qucik reference about bear, wild boar, cougar safety what to look for that its their area, how to tell if you are being stalked by a preditor and if encountered how should we act?
clearly we should add bear spray to our bug out bag! i do wonder if it works on pigs and cougars... and wolverines. thats a scary story.
should we have to neutralize an attack can you turn the unfortunate incident into supper? can you eat wild cat?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
from a different bear site:

sing or holler at your hiking buddies. Just don't be a ninja. Bears don't like to be surprised.

As you hike through bear country, keep an eye out for claw marks or droppings, and note any scratched up trees or fresh kills, such as deer.


Okay, so you've spotted a bear, and the bear has spotted you. Stop right there, and don't move. Speak to the bear in a low, calm voice, and slowly raise your arms up above your head. This makes you appear larger

"But bears can climb trees," you say. You're right: some bears, like black bears, can climb trees. But others, like grizzly bears, cannot. Either way, if you can get more than 12 feet up into a tree, you should be okay. That's pretty far up, so this is not your best option.

If a bear is charging you, you've got a couple of less-than-desirable options. The first thing you might try is going into the fetal position and playing dead. This might make you seem vulnerable to the grizzly bear and he or she will sniff you, growl at you, and hopefully leave you alone. Being in the fetal position will also protect your vital organs. IMPORTANT: If you're dealing with a black bear, do NOT play dead. They'll be thrilled that the work's been done for them and will commence lunch. If you can't tell what kind of bear you're dealing with, don't try it!


If a bear is charging you and you've got a gun, now might be the time to use it. Make sure you've got a clean shot because it usually takes more than one bullet to kill a bear and bad aim will only make it angrier. This should only be used as a last resort -- wrongful killing of a bear in the United States incurs a hefty fine up to $20,000.

Many camping and national park areas don't allow firearms, so some recommend bear spray or pepper spray. But beware: If you spray halfheartedly, it will only make the bear angrier.

Your last option is to fight back with everything you've got. There's really no need to tell you that, at this point, you're in big trouble. Kick, scream, flail your arms, go for the eyes -- do whatever you can because you're in for the fight of your life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
concerning mountain lions: good ole cut n paste

How to Avoid or Survive an Encounter with a
Mountain Lion - also know as panther, puma, cougar, painter, and catamount
DON'Ts

Don't hike, bike, or jog ALONE in lion territory
Don't plan outdoor activities during the hours from dusk to dawn
Avoid walking near dense growth, rock outcroppings, or under ledges
Don't act afraid of a lion, if you encounter one
Don't try to sooth it verbally, as this may backfire
Don't bend over, crouch, or kneel
Never turn your back on a lion
Never, Never run from a lion
If you live in potential lion territory
Don't allow children to play alone outdoors or walk to or from the bus stop
Don't leave pets outdoors
Don't feed pets or other prey animals (such as raccoons and deer) outdoors,
as both the food and the animals may attract lions
Don't go outdoors for long periods or at the same time every day
Use Independent Thinking: Don't rely on mere theories about what will cause lions to attack and eat you
DOs

Keep children and pets in sight at all times
Always look up and behind you: Emulate other prey by being constantly vigilant
Wear a helmet, hood, or hat whenever outdoors. Paint eyes on the back and/or top
If you live in potential lion territory
Install outdoor lighting so that you can see this persistent predator at night
Remove all tall or dense growth on your property to eliminate hiding places,
especially within 30 yards (over two lion bounds) of children's play areas
Re-plant only non-native plants that won't hide lions or nourish prey such as deer/rabbits/raccoons
If you do encounter a lion, try to give it a way out
Look a lion in the eye(s)
Make loud, firm noises: You may even show your teeth and make snarling sounds
Make yourself look big
Raise your coat, jacket, or any clothing with your arms
Stand up straight, and swell your chest
Children with no adult should always be in a group and should bunch together
Adults pull children close to appear larger and to prevent them from running
Without kneeling, pull a small child on your shoulders to appear larger
You may back away slowly, if you feel you can retreat
Use anything available as a weapon if the lion displays aggression
but *generally not if you must turn your back, crouch, kneel, or bend over to get one
Carry mace or pepper spray where you can easily reach it
Use fists, sticks, rocks, tools, a pocket knife, a bicycle,
whatever you can hit with, throw, and/or use as a shield
Target an eye with your thumbs, fingers, or a weapon
Find out for yourself where lions might be by checking multiple sources
Encourage officials and others to be realistic about lions and not just "environmentally correct" about them
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
concerning wild dogs/prolly any dog...
How to Survive an Attack by an Aggressive Dog


Again, avoidance is the surest way to ensure that an attack by an aggressive dog doesn't occur, but if an attack cannot be avoided, quick thinking and aggressive measures must be implemented.If an aggressive dog confronts you, use a calm voice to let the animal know that you are not interested in a fight.Keep your body turned towards the dog and talk to him while slowly backing away.Remain tall and erect, and if at possible try to make your body appear bigger than it really is.As you are walking away, try to locate a stick to use as a possible weapon should the animal decide to attack.If the dog does lunge at you, remain standing while kicking the animal in the face.Your legs are better suited for defense as they are generally stronger than one's arms.If you have a stick, deliver full, forceful blows to the animal's face and ribs in an effort to weaken him.If there is a possibility for you to move to higher ground such as on a car, a raised platform, or a tree, then do so.Any leverage you have on the wild dog will work to your advantage and hopefully result in fewer injuries and an increased chance of survival.
 
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