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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It was kind of thrust upon me in a hard way in 09. Today I see countless articles on 401ks, maximizing social security, and this and that. So little is written about changing your life style, reducing expenses, eliminating debt, and being healthy. Preppers often focus on the stock up, a year of food, 2000 rnds a caliber, silver and gold. I just want to say it's better to put your resources into a sustainable life style then a bank of stored foods, metals, and buckets.

I found it possible (and necessary) to live on $9k a year and thanks to no debt that was possible. To pass the time I turned raw land into row crops that are now leased out and I'm up to $20k this year vs $9k a few years back. Yes I got a nice PT teaching gig this year and I've felt flush with money ever since, even buying new firearms and such.

You want to retire save for it, live for it, and enjoy it. This year my wife and I paid over $3k on a trip to Ireland for 10 days, and we saved for it over 17 months and incurred zero debt. We still have not decided on the next trip but were setting aside money for it already....can't wait...whatever it is.
 

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I doubt I'll ever truely retire as long as I am physically able to work. However, I have plans for when we cut from the rrat race, downsize in a smaller community to cut expenses, and work at something a bit more enjoyable.

It takes planning and sacrifice.
 

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I agree. Live within your means.

Me, I'm not even 30 yet. I had been saving for retirement, but had to blow through my savings. I have $10 to my name right now.

BUT, and this is a big but.

I've been landscaping my yard and setting it up so that if I end up staying here, I have food out there. If I end up retiring here (unlikely, but plausible) then when I'm old and gray, and a navel orange costs $10, I'll have at least food growing here. I'll save money that way. My annual income is about $5000 a year. Yeah. Way below poverty level.

But when all the trees are fully matured, then I'll be better off. And when that happens, or I get a full time job, I'll still be planting and growing my own food. And then I MIGHT pump money back into a savings account. I just would rather have a fruit tree growing and producing food, than $20 in the bank.

As it is now, I get a few dollars, and it goes into the yard (if bills were paid first and I have money left over)

I guess my yard is my retirement account?
 

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When I was a "single man", I frequented restaurants and bars. I have blown throu more money than I care to remember. It wasn't unusaul to spend 100 dollars at a bar, Was easy to spend $40 on dinner and a two drinks. I worked hard, I played hard.
Like a damn fool. I drank and smoked and had some very questionable "relations" with some questionable women. I always put work first, but would have a great time after work, often buying dinner and or drinks for "so called friends".
I am ashamed at my myself sometimes, becouse I have really "screwed off a fortune", literally with nothing but a few drunken drug hazed memories that I would mostly like to bury.
Thank GOD I found a good woman, and stopped my foolishness.
As far as retirement, I dont know. I have a decent amount of 401k stashed away, and was one month away from taking a huge penalty and withdrawing half, just to put down on a propper house for the fiance, Damn, I NEED to marry her.
I almost feel like there's no way I could ever retire, unless physically I give out, becouse I dont think I would ever be comfortable. THANK GOD for my health.
As for Ripon's post, yes, I have drastically tightened the belt.
It is so different when you and a child need something, lets say a pair of shoes, and you automatically would rather wear your old worn out shoes, just to insure that your child has new shoes.
I think my "little family" has opened my eyes to the future, and retirement is over 30 years away. And has definately made me re-evaluate my life.
Ok, I guess Ive rambled enough.
 

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Probably the best plan for retirement is a home that is paid off. Though you still have utilities & upkeep, no rent or mortage. But you still want to bank a few dollars per month toward upkeep of the place & have to save up for the property taxes.

Next big expense is vehicle. Even if paid for still have insurance, license plate, upkeep, & fuel for it. So you have to bank money monthly toward it also. But one thing you can do is make as few trips as possible. I live 15 miles one way from the nearest town but only go to town once every two weeks. City is 40 miles one way but only have to go there once few few months for some reason & will stop by town on the way home.
 

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Probably the best plan for retirement is a home that is paid off. Though you still have utilities & upkeep, no rent or mortage. But you still want to bank a few dollars per month toward upkeep of the place & have to save up for the property taxes.

Next big expense is vehicle. Even if paid for still have insurance, license plate, upkeep, & fuel for it. So you have to bank money monthly toward it also. But one thing you can do is make as few trips as possible. I live 15 miles one way from the nearest town but only go to town once every two weeks. City is 40 miles one way but only have to go there once few few months for some reason & will stop by town on the way home.
Totally agree.

My home is paid off. I live about 2-2.5 miles away from several shopping centers (clothes, food, etc) and can walk there if I had to. I've actually been thinking of non opping my vehicles and riding a bike to go to the stores. But I have to keep one running/registered because I have an elderly grandmother that I take to her appointments and such. One of the reasons I got a newer car (1991 lol) is 1) I was having a baby (miscarried, so no longer needed). Needed a reliable 4 door, and 2) because I needed a reliable car to take my grandma where she needed to go.

So I may non op 3 of them.

Should save me money lol.
 

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Always have to do a list between need & want items. A computer & internet are want items. A TV & antenna to atleast get local weather & news I feel is a need. But cable or satelite TV is a want.

Make sure the money is available for needs before even considering any wants.
 

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We have lived a conservative life style . I retired from the Army and in a couple years will retire from a second civilian position.
This Government who knows they can take every thing you have is a flash. We pay more in property taxes now than our homes cost.
Bills paid we are ready when the day come to turn the alarm clock off.
We plan to keep preparing but enjoy life also, if S don't hit the fan we will ride of on the bikes and see as much as we can in the last years.
 
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Retirement may not be all that it's cracked up to be. So, I travel and for a good part of the year I'm on the road. I hang at Quartzsite AZ for the winter or part of the winter doing a tad of prospecting. I end up doing more exploring then prospecting. Prospecting is a bummer anyway, as most areas where retired floks go is so picked our there's no sense in doing it. At Quartzsite there is a LTVA (Long Term Visitors Area)(Google it) set up by the BLM. There's also one set up at Imperial Dam Southern CA near Yuma AZ. For 180 bucks one can stay all winter. In the summer I'm In WI doing gardening and getting kicked around by the Grand Kids (so to speak) But--I'd rather be retired and able to choose what to do rather then be chained to a company that wouldn't give a damn if I passed away.
 
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I too retired from the military after 20 years, and then retired at 56 from a 2nd career. I still do contractor work occasionally when a guy I know needs extra help. My property taxes have risen to the point where they are about even with my mortgage payment. If it wasn't for the fact that my kids live here, I would pack up and move to another state that doesn't have property taxes. Long before I even thought of retiring I saw a news story about how many retired people in my area were moving to Florida, not so much because of the weather, but because they could no longer afford their property taxes, and at the time I thought to myself what a load of garbage it was to be forced out of a home that you may have lived in for 40 or 50 years because the government taxed you out of it.
 

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My second life has been non government. Don't get me wrong I do not regret my time in the Army. but if I had no idea how great normal employment was.
The things you get paid for. I know many jobs suck but there are also some that are a really cool deal. I am often ask at work why I don't walk away.
I like what I do and I maybe sick in the head but I enjoy working. Most of what we do now is for our grandchildren and there is nothing wrong with that IMO. The homes are paid for so are the toys. I am just not ready to quit yet. In October I took some time to think about leaving after 15 days I knew it was not the time yet. Made a commitment of two more years.
I look forward to the day Wife and I can get on the bike and go anytime any where.
 

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I doubt I will ever retire. I enjoy making money too much. I do not really care about having money; I just love earning it. I doubt I will stay in the computer biz too much longer though. That is starting to get a bit stale, especially all of the travel. But I'll always be doing some kind of business.
 

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I too retired from the military after 20 years, and then retired at 56 from a 2nd career. I still do contractor work occasionally when a guy I know needs extra help. My property taxes have risen to the point where they are about even with my mortgage payment. If it wasn't for the fact that my kids live here, I would pack up and move to another state that doesn't have property taxes. Long before I even thought of retiring I saw a news story about how many retired people in my area were moving to Florida, not so much because of the weather, but because they could no longer afford their property taxes, and at the time I thought to myself what a load of garbage it was to be forced out of a home that you may have lived in for 40 or 50 years because the government taxed you out of it.
One of the early SCOTUS cases was Brown vs Maryland it concerned the state of Maryland taxing a Federal bank. The SCOTUS said the state could not tax a Federal institution "Because the right to tax is the right to abolish." I think on that when I hear the terms Property Tax and Income Tax.
 

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Retired military here, I fish, hunt, go metal detecting and camping, No Bills... I am actually looking at prospecting up in the mountains.. Thats my retirement plan..Living and loving life..and having fun doing it...
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Having a home paid off and a property paid off is critical. Using the property I built a second home and will soon rent out the expensive one in CA when I'm able to leave the state permanently and not look back (much). We paid off our vehicles when we settled our business closure too. Later I sold one of the vehicles because people said it was worth $10k (too much to me). I was glad to take the cash and use $2700 on a 1992 Ford F150 which has been great except it does burn some gas. There is a good chance I'll be searching for a diesel soon and sell the pick up and splurge on a diesel as we've been experimenting with making bio diesel from the farm. I figure, right, now I spend about $150 a month which is a sizeable sum on 45 gallons of gasoline a month. I'd love to put that one to rest. Food was among the easiest to save on and I'm certain I'm eating better for it too. The only foods I need to buy are rice and beans (lentils mostly) since we can grow everything else - I have not grown rice or any beans other then green beans.

I don't mean to discount the saving of money into a retirement account. When we closed the business and paid off our bills we had little cash left. I was able to invest in some equipment, some land, and housing materials from my self directed IRA to add farm land to the property that is now leased, build the house and so forth. I wouldn't have been able to do that without the IRA. You have to play by the "mans" rules when it comes to that or you'll pay serious penalties for early withdraw, but there are lots of things people can do within those rules that they'd never thought of - like buy land, like buy a tractor, and even pay yourself for hours on that tractor leveling off land and ripping the soil.

Totally agree.

My home is paid off. I live about 2-2.5 miles away from several shopping centers (clothes, food, etc) and can walk there if I had to. I've actually been thinking of non opping my vehicles and riding a bike to go to the stores. But I have to keep one running/registered because I have an elderly grandmother that I take to her appointments and such. One of the reasons I got a newer car (1991 lol) is 1) I was having a baby (miscarried, so no longer needed). Needed a reliable 4 door, and 2) because I needed a reliable car to take my grandma where she needed to go.

So I may non op 3 of them.

Should save me money lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If Detroit or any of the communities bankrupt wanted to recover all they'd have to do is create a property tax free zone. People would flock to own land where there is no taxation - not that I could trust them to leave it off; our beloved NV has some pretty low property taxes.

One of the early SCOTUS cases was Brown vs Maryland it concerned the state of Maryland taxing a Federal bank. The SCOTUS said the state could not tax a Federal institution "Because the right to tax is the right to abolish." I think on that when I hear the terms Property Tax and Income Tax.
 

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Our property taxes are stupid expensive. We've lived in this house for almost 17 years and, thankfully, it has appreciated about 65% which along with our equity should let us get pretty much anything we want when we downsize to rural county with much lower taxes. Hell, I've seen houses that would have a lower mortgage payment than our current taxes if we didn't want to have room for the kids and grandkid if necessary.

4 years, 2 months, and 15 days is the tentative target date and we'll see if some decisions in my 20's pay off and I can go do what I want to do rather than what I need to do. Hell, I may even try and teach in a small rural school district and coach some high school baseball.
 

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I'll be 49 when I retire from the hell hole I work at now, that's 6 years 11 months and 22 days away (not that I'm counting or anything). House isn't paid off and won't be by then but I should have some equity in it so when I sell it to move to a free state I should have some cash for a piece of land. My pension which I can start collecting the day I retire is 50% of my Final Average Salary (should be around 40k per year) and I have a bit squirreled away in mutual funds so I should be alright provided everything doesn't go to hell in a hand basket. I won't be able to stop working altogether but I'm hoping to go into business for myself so I don't have to work for someone else. I've been playing with the idea of building custom knives as a retirement income and maybe opening a gun shop but mostly I just want to get the hell out of New York and move some place that's a whole lot less restrictive and a lot cheaper to live. I don't see me not working since I get bored kind easy and no good ever comes of that plus my wife would likely divorce me if I was around the house full time.

-Infidel
 

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I retired last Monday 12-9-2013 so I am new at this. I took the company buyout which is basically one years pay and since I had 25 years my insurance will be paid for until I turn 65 in 4 years then they pay $3000 a year for supplemental insurance. I know I will have to stay away from the gun shops. But I have everything paid off except I still owe some on my home and that is my next big decision to pay it off or keep the money in the IRA. Seems most on here say they paid their house off and that is what I am leaning to.
 

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My wife works part-time, I work full time one job and spend from 1 to 40 hours a week running the ranch depending on the season. We work hard but feel very lucky to have a decent income from our various jobs. Retirement is on the horizon for me from my full time job. The minimum would be another 52 months but with 3 young kids 100 months is more likely. I'll always work the ranch. Fortunately, I was able to pay it off a couple of years ago. Once the ranch was paid off I went back into debt buying new equipment - tractor, backhoe and excavator. I wanted to make sure everything was paid off in full before I retire. Hopefully it will all work out and so far it has.
 
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