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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all
Once again: sorry for any confusion due to my english skills

I am limited in rooms and free space for storing food at home. We do live in a house but share it with familiars who own the cellar/basement and fully use it. I don't want people to see my storage and as I don't have a separate room, I am using free spaces in several rooms. My idea was to use plastic boxes and spread them somehow invisible all over the house. We do have a lot of dark spots (behind sofa, under sofa, small cabinets for cleaning stuff, etc) where I can put those boxes. We also have some space behind different boards and cabinets.

Is there any recommended way to fill those boxes? At the moment I have some mixed boxes with things like noodles, rice, try fruits, instant meals, etc. So every box is a mix of different food items.

This is a picture of one of my boxes that I am filling up right now:

Food Ingredient Cuisine Food storage Superfood

Wood Facial tissue holder Gas Rectangle Gadget


Are there any rules I should follow like "don't put x and y together in a box" or "always put X on the bottom and Y on top" or something like this?

Thanks for your input on this :)
 

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Heavy stuff (canned goods) on the bottom. Boxed stuff in the middle. Light stuff and items in loose packaging on top.

I'd switch to opaque totes.
 

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I hope I am understanding your needs. I see you are storing foods in their original packaging. So I must ask, how long do you plan on storing these foods? And do you intend to rotate the foods frequently?
I ask because some of the foods will have a relatively short period of time they will remain nutrious, depending on the type of food.

Since I do not know your level of knowledge regarding storage techniques, please do not be offended if I start from my beginning.
I used a similar type of storage, when I began years ago. Since then, I have progressed to very long term storage (10 to 20 years) by repackaging my dry food preps (rice, flour, dehydrated potato products, powdered milk, etc.) into aluminized Mylar bags, using oxygen absorbers to eliminate the degradation of the nutrient value/taste of the food. In addition to oxygen degrading the food, ultraviolet light from sunlight has a similar affect. The aluminized coating on the Mylar helps to eliminate that problem. Obviously foods packaged in cans won't suffer the affects of ultraviolet light. Foods I purchase that are in clear class containers (jelly/jam,pickles, syrup, and home canned foods), that are going into storage for 3-6 years, I wrap with aluminum foil to block ultraviolet light. Semi-transparent containers like storage container in your photographs will not block ultraviloet light, if they are exposed to sunlight. Opaque storage containers will do a better if not adequate job. The one great thing about large storage containers, as in your photos, it ability to stack containers.
I have read on this forum, some people will add blocks or other devices under the legs of beds and other funiture to enable them to slide sorage containers under the furniture to conceal the container.

The little I remember of German as well as most European residences is the small size compared to US residences. Storage space always seemed minimal. I might suggest when purchasing canned foods from stores, to save enough money to purchase an entire case of food, making it easier to store and stack. From my experience, the type of containers in your photos will waste a great deal of volume unless you can find very small item to pack into the crevices. A few of my friends have used stacks of either cartons of food or storage containers as tables next to chairs and sofas, by covering them with a nice fabric throw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I hope I am understanding your needs. I see you are storing foods in their original packaging. So I must ask, how long do you plan on storing these foods? And do you intend to rotate the foods frequently?
I ask because some of the foods will have a relatively short period of time they will remain nutrious, depending on the type of food.

Since I do not know your level of knowledge regarding storage techniques, please do not be offended if I start from my beginning.
I used a similar type of storage, when I began years ago. Since then, I have progressed to very long term storage (10 to 20 years) by repackaging my dry food preps (rice, flour, dehydrated potato products, powdered milk, etc.) into aluminized Mylar bags, using oxygen absorbers to eliminate the degradation of the nutrient value/taste of the food. In addition to oxygen degrading the food, ultraviolet light from sunlight has a similar affect. The aluminized coating on the Mylar helps to eliminate that problem. Obviously foods packaged in cans won't suffer the affects of ultraviolet light. Foods I purchase that are in clear class containers (jelly/jam,pickles, syrup, and home canned foods), that are going into storage for 3-6 years, I wrap with aluminum foil to block ultraviolet light. Semi-transparent containers like storage container in your photographs will not block ultraviloet light, if they are exposed to sunlight. Opaque storage containers will do a better if not adequate job. The one great thing about large storage containers, as in your photos, it ability to stack containers.
I have read on this forum, some people will add blocks or other devices under the legs of beds and other funiture to enable them to slide sorage containers under the furniture to conceal the container.

The little I remember of German as well as most European residences is the small size compared to US residences. Storage space always seemed minimal. I might suggest when purchasing canned foods from stores, to save enough money to purchase an entire case of food, making it easier to store and stack. From my experience, the type of containers in your photos will waste a great deal of volume unless you can find very small item to pack into the crevices. A few of my friends have used stacks of either cartons of food or storage containers as tables next to chairs and sofas, by covering them with a nice fabric throw.
Thanks for your reply. The boxes are in a size of 60 liters each. All food I store is food that we eat in general. When buying those, I make sure they will last a year minimum (only a few exceptions). As I am also some sort of data hoarder (I scan every letter I receive), I do have lists that are synchronized on all my devices (with backups of course) containing all items that I store. So I can always check the dates and see how long everything will be good. Once something getting close to the "best before" date I take it off and we eat and replace it.

I already have a big amount of stored food in our kitchen that we eat. So whenever something is getting too old, I take it out of my prepper storage and into my kitchen storage. So its a rotation of prepping and using in daily life. New items go into my prepper storage and older ones into kitchen.
 

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Sharing the house with others who are not "on board" with your preparedness could pose a potential risk, or what we often refer to as a violation of "OPSEC" (Operational Security).
Any time there is a risk of others discovering what we've been doing, or our own "loose lips" giving away too much information to unknown people, it's considered a violation of "OPSEC", as we have now potentially exposed our plans to another who may not be trustworthy.
Even if you know the person well, you don't know who they might talk to, and how much that 3rd person can be trusted.
"Loose lips sink ships" is an old American phrase for describing this risk. Secrets should stay secret.

To that end, I would recommend that any storage solution you go with be concealed and/or intentionally mis-labeled so as to throw off or confuse prying eyes. A box labeled "winter coats" wouldn't get a second look from anyone randomly looking in a closet.
 

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We once used bricks to raise one of our beds just enough to give us more space to hide preps underneath it. One side of the bed was against a wall, so we just pulled the comforter down a little further on the exposed side. As Kauboh said above, you can label storage containers under your bed as ”winter coats” or “Christmas decorations” to divert curious eyes.
 

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I collect heavy-duty fresh produce cardboard boxes that they discard at a grocery store. I choose same-size for stacking (various sizes depending on what I intend it for).
I find that they are good for canned goods and jars or bottled like various pickled vegetables. Some boxes can easily fit tall bottles/jars.

I label what's in each box (labels facing out to better see it), and stack them up depending on what item is used more often and the weight - from heavy to lightest on top (for easy lifting when I'm getting something out, or putting something in).

The boxes don't sit on the food items, but are propped by very sturdy corners (the boxes are made stacking sturdy for travel, and to protect
the fresh produce from bruising).

I have them stacked 4 boxes high (which isn't very high) that I can add more if needed. They save a lot of space.

I have older stocks of often-used items (the ones that has to be used first) in my pantry, so I don't have to dig up into the boxes every time.

Products that bugs like and could get into like flour, oats, rice, potato flakes, etc.., are in plastic bins, strewn with dried herbs like cloves, oregano, bay leaves - the smell repel bugs.

Cardboard boxes of various kinds are being offered for used in some grocery stores in lieu of plastic bags now. Some stores - even WalMart - don't do it.
If your store don't do this,maybe you should try talking to a fresh produce manager and ask for them.
 

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Hi all
Once again: sorry for any confusion due to my english skills

I am limited in rooms and free space for storing food at home.
Is there any recommended way to fill those boxes? At the moment I have some mixed boxes with things like noodles, rice, try fruits, instant meals, etc. So every box is a mix of different food items.
I find it gets harder to do rotation when my items are mixed up.
When you have accumulated a lot - it also gets harder to look for items.
It really makes it easier to organize them when you have the time.

To start, put soups together, canned vegetables together, packaged spices and mixes together, assorted beans together, etc..,

Later on, you may even put specific soups and specific items together (like Beef soup all together, pork and beans all together, plain beans all together, carrots all together, etc.,).

And when you really have acquired quite a variety of stockpile, you can simplify it further, like I have separate boxes each for smoked sardines, pink salmon, tuna, sardines in tomato sauce from Vietnam (Grace brand), sardines in tomato sauce (Brunswick)....etc.., The challenge is to find a space for them in your place. Caouflaged them, as what others had suggested is best in your situation. Put old books on the forefront so anyone who sees the box would think it's a box full of old books! Or, old clothes.

I've got a stack of boxes in the old shower that's not being used anymore, and the very top, I placed old magazines. I put other junky-looking stuff on top. I check where it would show any canned stuffs through the boxes, and I covered them by inserting paper.

In a box that has beef soup dated 2022/2023 as an example - to easily know at a glance which item has to be used first, I either write on top of the cans with markers the Best Before year - or, put on the label which side of the box has to be used first. Needless to say, group together same bb-date items in that box.

I can't stress enough the practicality of labelling what's in a box.
 
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