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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One option I've thought about is buying a yacht. Prices are at an all time low right now & a moving target is harder to hit. I like the idea of being portable without carrying everything. It's not like someone is going to walk up on you either.
Once stationary, extra provisions could be hidden in the water, suspended from the bottom of the hull just in case you were boarded and your supplies raided. All they would get is a few days worth.
There are some issues like everything else but it's an option worth considering.
 

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Water is a little solid around here, 6 months out of the year. Good idea though.
 

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My opinion if you live on a island yes, otherwise no. And if you really had to go with some kind of boat it would have to be a sail boat if it where me. How far is that gas really going to get you? Wind is going to last longer. Yes wind is a little inconsistent but if it has gotten people across the oceans without a drop of gas I would say that's a better option. I learned to sail when I was younger, it's not that hard if you take the time to learn the basics.
 

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i dont know alot about boats, other than the one I baught was expensive, a large pontoon boat. check the price of dry dock or wet dock, both will have pros and cons, and check the maintanance needed, but I know you wouldn't jump blindly....The happiest day involved with my boat was the day I sold it, for 4900, after having an investment total of 2900. Just saying...
 

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Right area right person may make it work. Take some major adjustment in planning
 

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Play to your strengths. I'd probably go with a boat that could be operated by sail or motor just for the sake of diversity. Also you'd need to figure out sustainable food and water sources. At sea, you'd need to distill water for drinking if you ran out of stores. You'd also need to figure out gardening and such. An island would be the way to go there. You might be able to put a raised bed garden on some boats, but not a sailboat for sure.
 

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I'm spending the night in San Francisco right now, if I had the misfortune of living here a sail boat might be in order, but what you'd pay to fuel any motor yacht over 40 feet you can probably buy 5 acres.
 

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I almost bought a small yacht/cabin cruiser some years ago with the aim of living in it permanently, but although a second-hand one is cheap, there's so much British Waterways Board red tape that I never bothered. For example an annual "residential licence" costs the earth, and it must be a proper houseboat, otherwise you're not allowed to live on the thing, and there are BWB snoopers everywhere on the river system.
Of course, in a post-apocalypse world to hell with licences and stuff, I'd probably get something like this below, paint it in camo stripes and moor up a quiet backwater somewhere while the zombs are rioting and eating each other in the cities..:)

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm spending the night in San Francisco right now, if I had the misfortune of living here a sail boat might be in order, but what you'd pay to fuel any motor yacht over 40 feet you can probably buy 5 acres.
Wind is free. It never crossed my mind to buy anything but sail.
 

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A boat is a good way to go if you know what you're doing and plan appropriately. We have discussed this at some length on other threads. Basically, a motor "yacht" is not the way to go nor is a pontoon. You need to live in the right area and have the right skills. A sailboat, sized to fit your needs or a diesel trawler, again sized to fit your needs is the way to go.

Pirates/marauders are less of a worry at sea then on land in a shtf scenario. The right boat will give you plenty of options.
 

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I'm spending the night in San Francisco right now, if I had the misfortune of living here a sail boat might be in order, but what you'd pay to fuel any motor yacht over 40 feet you can probably buy 5 acres.
I have friends that were just hired for a long term job in SF. They hated to move but decided to ship their sailboat and live on it. The cost for slip, etc is about $700/month vs a box of an apartment for over $2,000/month. Beside, what better place if an quake hits and they can also move if they don't like the neighborhood. ;).

Little background though... They just returned from a 3 year cruise on their 40' sailboat and are very experienced. They've both been sailing for decades and have the background. They know how to live on a boat and make it work.
 

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Recall to even aquaponics is hard on a small boat.

Since the suffestion is a sail boat the one thing I would think you have to plan in advance is where are you going. Is that place defendable, can you sustain there (grow food ) and investing in desalination takes power - solar I assume.
 

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Maybe in the tropics where you could stop and forage fruit and replenish fresh water. The only defense you have is seclusion, anytime you get close enough to get shot at risks losing the whole thing. I would think piracy will be a bigger issue SHTF.

I personally do not know a single person that I would want to be on a boat with for a year, sorry honey.
 

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Piratesailor makes some great points and yeah this has been discussed in on thread extensively. For the right person in the right set of circumstances it does make sense. There are definitely some advantages to be had for sure. But with it comes some major disadvantages. For most folks from an investment point financially I think your better off purchasing land.

Yes boat prices are very low right now as many can no longer afford to maintain them, pay the slip or mooring fees or payments if they still have a loan out on the boat. I originally purchased my 37ft Lancer sail boat from a guy who blew the engine and couldnt afford to replace it and got tired of paying slip fees. I puchased it for 16K and put a 14K engine in it and did some refinishing work and now have a boat with a replacement cost of 95k in value!

In fact I am stalking one boat now, a 32ft Sport Fisher, thats behind on slip fees and going through the process of having a lien put against it by the Marina. When it does finally go through I am going to be there to wheel and deal with Russ the Marina owner per chance I can make a deal with the devil. So there are some deals to be had out there and some at a steal of a price, but dont under estimate the cost of retrofitting it and bringing it up to speed or the cost of maintenance and upkeep. Both can add up increadibly fast!

The way I see it if its not something you can use just about every other week end year round then its likely not going to be worth what its going to cost you. If your renting and apartment and considering moving on to a boat and living in it then you might actually come out money ahead. Its not for everyone though...
 

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Real property. Seriously.

Sailboats will be sitting ducks. If you cannot outgun it or outrun it, you are getting boarded, for sure. Then you are going swimming. If you are lucky. If not, it will really suck to be you.

A large boat will just be a large target. Guns take out your motor. And if you find yourself up against a faster boat filled with well-armed marauders...well, good luck with that.
 

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First, a sail boat with an auxilary diesel engine would be a great alternative to real estate. The open ocean is a great place to hide because you can only see six miles for every six feet above the water's surface. You have to have navigation gear, skills and good maps because you won't want to rely on GPS as it can be tracked. Stay away from the areas that have nearby large populations and known pirate problems. Keep a gun that can shoot at least 500 meters to keep approaching boats away and plan on getting a boat that will support at least six adults so you have a team to keep watch and defend. A solar still can make a surprising amount of fresh water and have nets and fishing gear to keep yourself fed. A small hydroponic garden can provide vitamins and minerals but you will need to keep flour and sugar stored on the boat.
 

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Land. Definitely land. Most, as in 99.999% of people and most on this forum don't have a clue about real boats, cruising, locations, pirates, etc and can only comment or guess based on theory, news article or their experience with a bayliner runabout.

So, unless you have a boat, it's your passion, and have sailed for years including long distances, I would highly recommend buying land and NOT a boat for any bail out location or vehicle.

A boat might be good for a lake near your property or to aid in getting to your land but otherwise, forget it.
 

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The advantage that a boat has over land is that if you are off shore more than the limit you don't have taxes to pay. Land can be confiscated for as little as three years back taxes. I have to pay over $1500 a year on my land and home so if the SHTF I need a lot of silver to protect myself from the collectors. You don't actually believe that the taxes will be forgiven do you?
 
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