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Any good books out there about living off the land?

I'd be up for buying something like this to have on hand
 

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My favorite books are the Foxfire series. They are really not "how to" books, but tell the stories of the Appalachian mountain people in their own words. The prepper comes out through the stories. The books started out as a school project in the 70's and took off. Great stories and a lot of hidden prepper gems such as how to make Head Cheese. One story is how to weave a cane back chair. Creek Stewart and Bear Grills have nothing on the real mountain people.
 

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Any good books out there about living off the land?

I'd be up for buying something like this to have on hand

Dave Canterbury has lots of stuff.

 
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"Practical blacksmithing", Andrews
(Also shows how to pick metal from scrap for all uses.)

"A reverence for wood", Eric sloane (slone?)

"Square foot gardening" is good for general knowledge, ideas and there are field, patch and pot crops - you will do all at once. Bag crops to if you oyster mushroom.

I grew up as a (suburbanized) set of foxfire books. It was called "Farm ain't spending cash money on what you shoulda made. That's just stupid waste" and other "adages of subsistence living" and if you didn't grow up in it, the first thing you have to realize is that its pictures and guides and yours might not be exactly like the picture (what you have to work with) so understand and accomplish the purpose and dont waste time or doubt because yours has old tennis shoes in it.
The second most important thing is don't look at pictures 3 times? You saw it, just do it? The books do no good at all or a whole lot less, if you are looking how to stack wood because its december. Become the art you do, get used to doing the things handy, so you already know how to do yours and what will happen. Acquire or make the tools you see and comprehend the nature of the work and tool so you could "invent ya own?" if you needed too.
Native shaman and wizards make all their own most important tools and gear?

Go to a rural livestock auction where they also have a big flea market and look at how stuff works and how it is for real - where "fashion" has very little meaning and everybody is a patchwork quilt of the good, solid usefuls they got together, very little brand new or brand name and plenty of home made.
Directly and deeply involve your children. Dangerous things, learn first before they do.
Try to walk a lot every day. When you go farm, you will walk miles around 10 acres.

(Example about home made, a mason jar makes an excellent laboratory beaker you can sterilize in too. Beakers are $15 and mason jars are $10 for 12.
*in school we used miller pony beer bottles for erlenmeyer flasks....but I don't think miller makes ponys anymore? Grew up on those too.
Pick a thing and do it or do all the skills it takes a way you can now, because "macguyver" was just a grandfather farmer 60 years ago.

For the senseless flowerdy that must have
"The perfect way to do, is to be"
 
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