Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

Looking for some ideas on how to build a raised bed frame. I want to ensure that I don’t use treated lumber where the chemicals can reach out into the garden. I also don’t want to use just regular pine as the wood will fail from rotting on the ground. I’ve entertained concrete blocks however again there’s fly ash and other chemicals that are mixed in in the production of concrete. I guess I’m looking for ideas or suggestions what you guys have done to ensure that your food stays organic and does not have contamination from man-made materials.

Before any replies question if I am a tree hugging hippie the answer to that question is no. I’m just ensuring that the food I produce is healthy and nutritious as possible. I have gardened in the past just planting on good old mother earth however due to living in a country where critters can eat your product or your produce I want to ensure that I protect that. So I will be putting in six raise beds this year and then putting chicken wire around it.

Thoughts.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,126 Posts
Cedar is rot resistant, but expensive. Locust works too, but hard to find. Guess you could find a sawmill and get some white oak. That stuff is harder than hell, but will eventually rot, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,094 Posts
Hello All,

Looking for some ideas on how to build a raised bed frame. I want to ensure that I don't use treated lumber where the chemicals can reach out into the garden. I also don't want to use just regular pine as the wood will fail from rotting on the ground. I've entertained concrete blocks however again there's fly ash and other chemicals that are mixed in in the production of concrete. I guess I'm looking for ideas or suggestions what you guys have done to ensure that your food stays organic and does not have contamination from man-made materials.

Before any replies question if I am a tree hugging hippie the answer to that question is no. I'm just ensuring that the food I produce is healthy and nutritious as possible. I have gardened in the past just planting on good old mother earth however due to living in a country where critters can eat your product or your produce I want to ensure that I protect that. So I will be putting in six raise beds this year and then putting chicken wire around it.

Thoughts.
We have raised beds for vegetable gardening that are

Galvanized Metal Stock Tanks--Some are nearing 10 years old now and no sign of rust or break down. Advantage is that they are higher off the ground so less bending over and tougher for varmints to get into.

Raised 6x6 Treated Lumber Beds--2 large beds and I have no concerns about the pressure treatment leaching into my garden veggies. I built these beds in 2012 and no signs of rot. Sun and water worn but no rot.

Raised 2x12 untreated lumber beds, 2' high-3 medium sized beds that I built last year and the verdict is out as to how long they will last.

Regardless, don't buy into the myth that Pressure Treated Lumber will kill you if your raised beds are surrounded by PT Lumber. Now if you eat 2000 lbs of pressure treated lumber in one sitting, I suspect it will hurt you but as borders for your garden, you're fine.
 

·
Registered
Staying alive
Joined
·
478 Posts
I wouldn't worry about anything leaching into your garden. Some people use railroad ties to make them without any problems. PT wood or whatever you may have laying around will be just fine.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Slippy

·
Registered
Joined
·
785 Posts
We have 6 beds of VERY expensive cedar. My nest 6 beds I went a different route - Hemlock wood (not poisonous) with a special treatment. It's their 2nd season and they are holding up just fine. The 4' x 4" corner posts are the only treated wood.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KVLTC7A/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

They are 2' H x 4' W x 12' L (most are L shaped). All with a drip watering system

Cedar ones:
20170519_120230.jpg

20170520_152001.jpg

Current (today) picture of what the area looks like: 6 beds on left cedar. 6 beds on right: hemlock with coating: Covered areas are the garlic beds and still some carrots. Also the strawberry bed.
20210110_140735.jpg

Peace,
Michael J.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,648 Posts
We have 6 beds of VERY expensive cedar. My nest 6 beds I went a different route - Hemlock wood (not poisonous) with a special treatment. It's their 2nd season and they are holding up just fine. The 4' x 4" corner posts are the only treated wood.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KVLTC7A/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

They are 2' H x 4' W x 12' L (most are L shaped). All with a drip watering system

Cedar ones:
View attachment 110635

View attachment 110637

Current (today) picture of what the area looks like: 6 beds on left cedar. 6 beds on right: hemlock with coating: Covered areas are the garlic beds and still some carrots. Also the strawberry bed.
View attachment 110639

Peace,
Michael J.
Forgive my ignorance. What is the advantage of L shaped beds?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,094 Posts
We have 6 beds of VERY expensive cedar. My nest 6 beds I went a different route - Hemlock wood (not poisonous) with a special treatment. It's their 2nd season and they are holding up just fine. The 4' x 4" corner posts are the only treated wood.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KVLTC7A/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

They are 2' H x 4' W x 12' L (most are L shaped). All with a drip watering system

Cedar ones:
View attachment 110635

View attachment 110637

Current (today) picture of what the area looks like: 6 beds on left cedar. 6 beds on right: hemlock with coating: Covered areas are the garlic beds and still some carrots. Also the strawberry bed.
View attachment 110639

Peace,
Michael J.
AWSEOME as always @Michael_Js

I'd love to have more flat land on which to lay out my gardens.

People, ridges/hills/mountains are really nice to look at but tough as hell to work!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
785 Posts
Forgive my ignorance. What is the advantage of L shaped beds?
Well, my wife found a picture, and wanted me to emulate - so...the answer, for me, was to make my wife happy - happy wife, happy life. She wanted it based on the following picture she found:

gardenLayoutIdea.jpg

I just do the work - she's the boss, I'm the horss ;)

Thank you,
Michael J.

No difference with the fireplace setup I built. She found a mantel layout she liked, I emulated it:

Her find:
fireplaceMantels.jpg

What I designed & installed:
20180406_152949.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks guys I appreciate the replies.

I showed my wife the pictures of the raised beds and she really likes the L beds for the four corners and then the two in the middle. I’ll probably do something similar than to that but I think I’ll put stone on the inside and then leave the outside open grass so I can extend my chicken run to allow the chickens to have more area to roam.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
839 Posts
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top