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Discussion Starter #1
In a "power out" emergency what frequencies are the most popular for HAMS for long range communication?

I know that the "local" search and rescue used to use 80 meter in the woods because the higher frequencies couldn't make it through the trees but that was a lot of years ago. I know the most popular "chat" frequencies are the 2 meter 144 MHz and the 3/4? meter at 440 MHz but that is because there are repeaters that are in use. If the repeaters go down what will the default band be?
 

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Using NVIS, I would say 30, 40, 80, and 160 MHz. There really is no default band; the beauty of amateur radio is the ability to select frequency to match propagation factors that can vary with time of day, time of year, solar activity, weather, etc.

However, the hams in your area may already have some emcomms frequencies they use for weekly nets--that would be important for you to know.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Using NVIS, I would say 30, 40, 80, and 160 MHz. There really is no default band; the beauty of amateur radio is the ability to select frequency to match propagation factors that can vary with time of day, time of year, solar activity, weather, etc.

However, the hams in your area may already have some emcomms frequencies they use for weekly nets--that would be important for you to know.
Do you actually mean MHz or are you meaning meters? The 80 meter band is down near 2 - 3 MHz I believe.
 

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Just to keep it simple I would work 40 and 80 with an NVIS antenna for each band. 80 meter band actually has a daily traffic net, a buddy of mine checks in a lot. I don't remember what freq it is. Most of the emcomm here in Texas will hit 40/80 the most I do believe and with NVIS you can keep it fairly local (TX,OK,LA). Another thing to consider would be an antenna book, mainly the part for long wire antennas since in a SHTF situation, buying a standard antenna might be tough. Finding enough wire to make an antenna will be somewhat easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I just go to the wrecking yard for antenna wire. All I need is a Chevy solenoid of the starter. It has more than enough 20 AWG wire for several antennas.
I prefer the inverted "V" antenna because of the reduced noise but I have also used rhombic antennas and di-poles. The inverted "V" is also harder to spot from any distance than the others and the rhombic takes up a lot of space.
 
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