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Berkey, . . . VS, . . . Daulton:

I'm getting ready to spend some hard earned cash for a water filter system, . . . these are the two names that I have seen bandied about here.

The Daulton price is basically $200 for a unit that uses 2 filters and can do 550 gallons with those filters.

The Berkey price is almost $300 for a 2 filter unit, . . . but they are saying 6000 gallons on those 2 filters.

Am I missing somthing?

Does anyone out there have personal knowledge that will shed some light on this?

I'd like to save the hundred bucks, . . . but not if the numbers are correct and there isn't some hidden player in the game.

May God bless,
Dwight
 

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We have a 4 filter version of the Berkey and we are very happy with it. I do not know anything about the Daulton.

But... I think it was Nathan Hale here that posted a statement from the Berkey people about a defective batch of filters. I checked ours and found them to not be part of the recall. But, I also discovered that the Berkey people do suggest that you test the filters out every 3-6 months. That is a pain to do because you have to pressurize the filters with water to ensure all of the filter material is wet. Once the test is done, it takes about a week for the filters to dry out enough to put back into storage. Whine complain, whine complain.

The long and short is I like our Berkey.
 

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I would just buy the Berkey filters (about $100) and find 2 food grade 5 gallon pails with lids and make my own. You can literally make one in about 20 minutes.

All you gotta do is drill 1 or 2 X 1/2" holes through the bottom of one of the containers and the top of another, then use the filters to clamp the lid under the top bucket. Set the container with the filters on top of the other one and fill it with water and yer done. Add a spout to the bottom one if you want.

Filters are good for removing a lot of stuff, but as I understand it, they don't guarantee they will remove 100% of any bacteria. If your water source is city water which has already been treated, this isn't a problem, but if your source is a pond, river, or rainwater catchment, it is a concern to me. I've seen a few vids of people using home-made systems, and these people always seem to treat their water (usually with bleach) AFTER they filter it.

I would treat the water first, let it sit for an hour or so, THEN filter it. The bacteria would still be dead, and the filter would remove most of the chlorine. This should leave you with much better tasting water. Or am I missing something here?
 
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