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Hubby is thinking of getting chickens for eggs. A new bylaw allows us to a maximum of 5 chickens.
Someone told me that freshly laid eggs from your own chicken (he had a friend doing it - selling eggs from home), shouldn't be put in the refrigerator. Eggs have their own natural coating when they come out of the chicken. They last a long time without going in the fridge. His friend just have them all lined up in his hallway, and selling them.


 

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Asian cultures have certain culinary ways of preserving them. The Philippines has their "salty eggs," prepared in brine.
I followed a recipe long ago, and it's good. I used chicken eggs - but I've had a taste of duck eggs, and it's really good.


I read once that duck eggs is best if you're going to use the traditional method of using mud, because duck eggs shells are thicker than chicken eggs. I didn't do it the traditional way. I followed a similar recipe below.


Salted eggs- the traditional method

Commercial salted eggs or itlog na maalat are made by “brining” fresh duck eggs in mud made of equal parts clay and salt moistened with water. The eggs are individually dipped in the mud bath to fully coat and are then allowed to cure for 15 to 18 days, depending on the eggs’ size.


  • 12 duck or chicken eggs
  • 5 cups water
  • 1 1/2 cups coarse salt

  • In a pot over medium heat, combine water and salt. Bring to a boil, stirring until salt is completely dissolved.
  • Remove from heat and allow to fully cool.
  • Place eggs in a large container. Add the brining solution, making sure the eggs are fully submerged.
  • Weigh down with a small plate or a plastic bag filled with water. Cover and keep in a cool, dry place for about 18 to 21 days.
  • Drain eggs from the solution.
  • In a pot, place eggs and enough water to cover. Over medium heat, bring to a boil, uncovered, for about 20 to 25 minutes or until hard-boiled.

  • Drain eggs and allow to cool. Store in the refrigerator.


***Note: someone says to boil the eggs for 2 minutes BEFORE putting them in brine, and then about
10 minutes more AFTER pickling.


Now, you got me wanting to do this again. I'd experiment doing both version and see the difference.


They're delicious eaten with fresh tomatoes, or as a side dish with chicken-rice soup or, as topping for the Chinese congee (thick rice porridge). It's versatile in a SHTF scenario.
 

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Egg shells are semi-permeable. Air can pass through the shell.
The suggestion to coat the eggs with a film of oil is intended to prevent this, and it does work.
If you can keep oxygen away from organic matter, it will last WAAAAY longer. Prepped correctly, unrefrigerated eggs can last weeks to months.
 

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If you search, you should find a thread on glassing - I have done this method and preserved 4 dozen eggs up to a year with no issues...Yes, it's with hydrated lime...

Peace,
Michael J.
 

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Asian cultures have certain culinary ways of preserving them. The Philippines has their "salty eggs," prepared in brine.
I followed a recipe long ago, and it's good. I used chicken eggs - but I've had a taste of duck eggs, and it's really good.


I read once that duck eggs is best if you're going to use the traditional method of using mud, because duck eggs shells are thicker than chicken eggs. I didn't do it the traditional way. I followed a similar recipe below.


Salted eggs- the traditional method

Commercial salted eggs or itlog na maalat are made by “brining” fresh duck eggs in mud made of equal parts clay and salt moistened with water. The eggs are individually dipped in the mud bath to fully coat and are then allowed to cure for 15 to 18 days, depending on the eggs’ size.


  • 12 duck or chicken eggs
  • 5 cups water
  • 1 1/2 cups coarse salt

  • In a pot over medium heat, combine water and salt. Bring to a boil, stirring until salt is completely dissolved.
  • Remove from heat and allow to fully cool.
  • Place eggs in a large container. Add the brining solution, making sure the eggs are fully submerged.
  • Weigh down with a small plate or a plastic bag filled with water. Cover and keep in a cool, dry place for about 18 to 21 days.
  • Drain eggs from the solution.
  • In a pot, place eggs and enough water to cover. Over medium heat, bring to a boil, uncovered, for about 20 to 25 minutes or until hard-boiled.

  • Drain eggs and allow to cool. Store in the refrigerator.


***Note: someone says to boil the eggs for 2 minutes BEFORE putting them in brine, and then about
10 minutes more AFTER pickling.


Now, you got me wanting to do this again. I'd experiment doing both version and see the difference.


They're delicious eaten with fresh tomatoes, or as a side dish with chicken-rice soup or, as topping for the Chinese congee (thick rice porridge). It's versatile in a SHTF scenario.
Interesting thread. Thanks. My wife is real picky about expiration dates and I make quite a few pickled eggs. using some that is near the expiry date. Will have to try this next time.
 

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I want to check out different ways various cultures preserve their eggs. Here's something I stumbled onto - from a homesteader! First time I heard about this. Great for those who's got so many supply of eggs!
The yolks look so beautiful!


Salt Cured Egg Yolks

A high salt environment inhibits certain spoiling bacteria, which allows other cultures to dominate. It’s not that salt prevents anything from living in the yolks, it’s just that it slows the growth of some types of bacteria until the others can take over and release lactic acid. It’s the lactic acid that actually preserves the food, and the salt just facilitated the whole thing.
Good work lactobacillus!

The whole adventure starts with egg yolks nestled into tiny cradles of salt. Pour about 1/2 inch of salt into a nonreactive container, like a glass or stoneware baking dish. Use the back of a spoon to make little indentions for the egg yolks, and then carefully separate the eggs. Be sure that the yolk isn’t punctured, or it’ll just run everywhere into the salt. Carefully set each yolk in its salt divot.

Once your platter is full of egg yolks, it’s time to completely cover the yolks. Add more salt until the yolks are completely covered. They should be totally invisible, covered by at least 1/4 inch of salt on top. All you should see is tiny bumps in the salt where once you could see the bright yellow of egg yolks.

The egg yolks will lie in wait beneath the salt, slowly curing, for about a week. They should be kept cold during this process, to keep things cultured slow. Place the whole tray in the fridge and forget about it until next week. Once the salt cure time is up, dig each egg yolk out of the salt. They’ll be firm enough to remove by hand, but still a bit tacky because they haven’t been dried yet.

The next step is to air dry the salt-cured yolks. I’ve seen recipes that try to speed up the process by placing the yolks in a 200-degree oven for about an hour. That does indeed dry them out, but that’s like saying you can speed up the curing process on prosciutto by sticking it in the microwave.

Dust any extra salt off the yolks, using a damp towel if necessary. Place them on a length of cheesecloth, and then wrap the cheesecloth around them like a burrito. The yolks should stay separated to ensure good airflow and allow for even drying. Tieing a bit of butchers twine at intervals between the yolks will keep them separate, while at the same time holding the cheesecloth firmly around the yolks.

The whole thing will look a bit like a string of caramel candies.
Each yolk tucked into its own little chamber, all in one neat string.

At this point, it’s time to air dry the egg yolks. Hang the string somewhere cool for 7 to 10 days to allow the yolks to air dry. The fridge is a good spot, or a cool dark back closet. Ideally, it’d be below 50 degrees.

At the end of the drying process, the yolks should be firm but not rock hard. If you allow them to dry too long they’ll be tough like egg yolk jerky, which is still edible, but it’s much harder to grate. We use a small micro plane to grate tiny bits of the salt-cured egg yolks for use on foods.

In the cure, you have the option to use all salt, or change it up and use half salt and half sugar. The sweet and salty cure creates a distinctly different result, and that one is even more suited to use in a dessert. I like the idea of putting a bit of the salt/sugar version as a salad topping too.

 

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Her site is interesting:


30+ Ways to Preserve Eggs

In the depths of winter, chickens slow their laying habits, and many breeds stop altogether. Then in spring, production turns on again and backyard chicken keepers are struggling to find more ways to use up eggs.


A consumer reports pamphlet from 1897 tested 20 different methods for preserving eggs. The summarized their results:
“Of those preserved in limewater, water glass, or varnished with vaseline all were good; of those treated with permanganate of potash, or with boric acid and water glass, or packed in wood ashes, or in peat dust 20 percent were bad; of those varnished with shellac, collodin, or water glass 40 percent were bad; of those submerged in salicylic acid, treated with alum, or sterilized 12 seconds in boiling water 50 percent were bad; of those rubbed with salt, packed in brine, covered with paraffin or varnished with glycerin and salicylic acid 70 percent were bad; of those wrapped in tissue paper or preserved in salicylic acid and glycerin 80 percent were bad; and of those preserved in salt water all were unpalatable, as the salt had penetrated the eggs. (source)”

It’s interesting to note that of the 20 methods tested over 100 years ago, almost all worked at least partially. In the past 100 years, there’s been further innovation and there are actually quite a few more methods to try.

Crates of Eggs
 
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