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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got the 2012 Seed Savers Exchange catalog of Heirloom and open pollinated Seeds...and will order the 2013 catalog.

I'm so moving away from seeds sold by the big box stores and going Hierloom next year. I'm stoked. I'm tired of getting the corn that didn't quite turn out as expected or the seeds that for what ever reason didn't germinate. I'm closing the loop and ditching the store bought seeds, call it self sufficiency or self defense...but relying on somebody else for my seeds is a weak link.

I also picked up a book on root cellaring, natures cold storage by Mike and Nancy Bubel, You can call it a fallout shelter, bunker etc. if you want I'll call mine a root cellar. Besides I need the shelf space and a root cellar is perfect for spuds onions and home canned food...and I do have a spot picked out to put one in...another project for next spring, and another step away from the super market herd and towards self sufficiency...
 

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That is good. I plan on growing almost exclusively heirloom seeds this coming year too.

Some of the seeds that stores sell are heirloom, and are generally cheaper than seeds from catalogs. Just a though in case you are prepping on a budget.
 

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I've been reading "Gardening When It Counts" Growing Food In Hard Times" By Steve Solomon. I guess he was in the seed business for many years and he talks in his book about how the store bought seeds are of such poor quality and do not meed standards for commercial growers. He suggests purchasing seeds from seed producers that have a similar climate to yours. For instance i live in southern Ca. he suggests Park Seed Company for my climate because the seeds are adapt for it. Its a good read for any one interested in gardening..... He also talks about heirloom seeds and which plants self pollinate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
We have a fair growing season in Idaho and can grow most if not all of the basic veggies...so thats a plus, besides I don't mind paying a bit more for my seeds up front, as long as they are good, and will carry over. I don't trust hybrid seeds sold through the big box stores past the first year.
 

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Im with you Seneca.

I didnt get any catalogs but I have been watching the local stores and buying Heirlooms as they show up on the shelf. A lot of the Big Box Stores are starting to jump on the heirloom bandwagon. I have been slowly switching from Hybrids to Heirlooms now for a couple of seasons. This past season I was able to recover seeds from about 8 varieties of Tomatoes, Hot Peppers, Bell Peppers, Zuccini, Squash, Okra and a variety of beans. I hope to continue making progress to that end.

While I was at Wally World, I caught the end of the season clearance on planter pots and picked up 20 self watering pots perfect for getting seedlings a great start before being transplanted for a buck each which was about 50% off. Cant wait for February to get here so I can start the planting and get a jump on the season as soon as we have our last frost date.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thats awesome!
I'm going to shoot for late March on my indoor starts, we usually see our last frost mid May. It varies, the old addage here is that when the snows off the top of the mountain it's time to plant. I watch the mountain...silly as it seems it's a reliable indicator of the last frost...
 

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We usually put our peas in first of May. The rest during Memorial weekend.
Alan
 
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