Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Would love to talk, share advice, ideas, etc. with other preppers.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,178 Posts
Ok, you first. What is your experience level? Neurosurgeon, nurse, dentist, EMT I or II, witch doctor???? But seriously folks, what's on your mind?
One thing that scares me is would I put myself in danger because my background of helping people might put me in a situation I didn't expect. You know, see the little injured kid and find a gang hiding to rob me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,693 Posts
I think quick-clot has a place, but it is not for use on every wound. I would surely have some in the first aid bag, but I wouldn't put it on any boo-boo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,820 Posts
What are your thoughts/Opinion on Quick-Clot?
The powder stuff has a terrible after taste and the Z folded guaze is really chewy...

But seriously..... I think the treated guaze is the way to go. While the powder, QuikClot or Celox, has fixed the burned tissue issue it still gets everwhere in the wound. Granted, if a wound is serious enough to warrant it's use and help is not readily available there are worse problems at hand than removing the hemostatic agent.

In my opinion, one can never have too much medical training or too many medical supplies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
This is something that I have been focusing on lately, picking up supplies and starting to do some reading on medical training. I would like to take some courses but the time just does not currently allow for it. I know how to take care of minor bumps and smaller cuts. The thing I need to start working on is seeing the signs of things that can be much worse.

Also I need to start learning about natural remedies. I have never been much of one to spend time reading but I am working on changing that. I picked up Doom and bloom's book recently (If you don't know who they are Google them). I am just about finished with the SAS survival guide and that is next. The more I read about medical treatment seems like one of the most important thing is how to help with the things you cannot see. Finding those are much more important that cut or slice in the skin.

Basically what I have come to and I am not expert by any stretch of the imagination but Knowledge is king when it comes to Medical treatment. If you are going to stock it know how to use it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,086 Posts
It is also a good idea to stock things that a medical professional could use if one happened by.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
672 Posts
I don't have any Quik-Clot on the ambulance I work on when I go into work. The best thing for an uncontrolled arterial bleed is first hard direct pressure to the site of the bleed. Then if that's not working apply a tourniquet. You may have heard to only use a tourniquet as a last resort, well all the action in Iraq and Afghanistan has basically re-proven the effectiveness of early tourniquet application. It will stop bleeding in an extremity. Now if it's somewhere in your torso or abdomen that's bleeding heavily in a SHTF situation you're probably in a real world of hurt. You can figure that if you're bleeding from the abdomen or torso anything that is bleeding externally is also bleeding internally at the same rate. Direct pressure again is not going to hurt, but it's going to be a lot harder of a time to pull through an injury like that without rapid access to surgical care.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,417 Posts
I don't have any Quik-Clot on the ambulance I work on when I go into work. The best thing for an uncontrolled arterial bleed is first hard direct pressure to the site of the bleed. Then if that's not working apply a tourniquet. You may have heard to only use a tourniquet as a last resort, well all the action in Iraq and Afghanistan has basically re-proven the effectiveness of early tourniquet application. It will stop bleeding in an extremity. Now if it's somewhere in your torso or abdomen that's bleeding heavily in a SHTF situation you're probably in a real world of hurt. You can figure that if you're bleeding from the abdomen or torso anything that is bleeding externally is also bleeding internally at the same rate. Direct pressure again is not going to hurt, but it's going to be a lot harder of a time to pull through an injury like that without rapid access to surgical care.
In my line a work they were handing it out like candy with no training. It of course is not a magic solution and has serious side affects (for lack of a better term). Pretty rugged where I work, last air lift took over 5 hours so solutions and what works is what I want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,319 Posts
I don't keep any quick clot on hand. I guess I figure if I need it and there is no medical support it will probably just prolong the suffering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
672 Posts
Something to remember at all times when it comes to medical type stuff, especially emergency medical issues. In a SHTF situation what's likely going to happen is that you'll have to rely on basic first aid type skills. There's a reason why a Paramedic must first be an EMT. EMT's learn the basic life support type stuff, like bandaging, splinting, rescue breathing stuff like that. Paramedics still do all that but we can also start IV's and give medications. However the main focus of both a Paramedic or an EMT is transporting the patient to the hospital where the patient can be treated by a Doctor in an Emergency Department (ED). That includes things like CPR and rescue breathing. Those things are just stop gap measures in the field where hopefully the underlying problem can be fixed in an ED, Cardiac Cath Lab, ICU or other specialty care center. Likewise with trauma putting pressure on a bleeding limb is only a stop gap measure, the "cure" for the problem is an Operating Room and a Surgeons scalpel along with the Surgeon fixing what ever unnatural hole is in the body that's causing the blood loss. If SHTF those services are either going to be overloaded or out of service all together. If anything is beyond your basic first aid skills to patch up, it's likely that that injured/sick person is in for a real world of hurt. Just something to be mindful of when you're thinking of medical preps.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top