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I was wondering if a pool is a viable thing to use for water storage since it can store so much somewhat clean water.
 

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Yes, provided you can keep it clean and then disinfect it prior to using it as drinking water. Without electricity to keep the pump running, and chemicals circulating, it will go green. While fine for storage, I would plan on disinfecting it regardless of what it looks like, prior to consuming the water.
 

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A pool would be a great asset whether you can drink the water or not. If the water stops running you can use the pool water to flush the toilet, just fill a 5 gallon bucket and pour it in the toilet or fill the flush tank.
 

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It's also a great way to raise fish (tilapia) or edible aquatic plants.... obviously... without the chemicals you'd normally treat a pool with.
 

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Yes, provided you can keep it clean and then disinfect it prior to using it as drinking water. Without electricity to keep the pump running, and chemicals circulating, it will go green. While fine for storage, I would plan on disinfecting it regardless of what it looks like, prior to consuming the water.
I am looking into the same thing. We are about to buy ahouse with a pool and there is a undergound 1000 gal propane tank hooked to a generator (will serve electric needs), and propane for cooking. May add a solor panel to the pool house to run the pool pumps. Wondering would chlorine or salt water pool be better to try and turn into drinking water? And why? Would running it through a Berkly Filter and then adding bleach do the trick? Currently the pool is chlorine, but thinking of changing it all out to a salt water system, 'if' the water chould be filtered etc for drinking if really needed. I have heard that the salt water system really is already safe to drink, that there isn't enough chemical in it to make you sick, but I don't know for sure.
 

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I had the same idea in mind for my pool. Actually turning green is a benefit as the non-preppers wouldn't have a clue how to process & drink it. All I plan to do is keep the cover on it to slow down evaporation.
 

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If you plan on using pool water be very careful of your chlorine treatments, only use the ones without antibacterials as those chemicals are toxic.
 
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BTW I was in Costco yesterday. Other than a lack of guns and ammo it is really an ideal prepper store. They had a pretty big above ground pool for $599. If you kept a filtration and proper chemical treatment supply handy that thing would probably serve up a life time of water.

Also as most parts of our nation get 6-12 inches of rain a typical home roof of a 1000 square feet will provide enough water for sustained life. You just have to store up for the dry season, filter and treat.

Water is to me one of the easiest and least expensive preps. Thank God since its also about the most important.
 

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I will be setting up a 33' round above ground pool this spring. It holds approximately 22,000 gallons. That will last quite a long time if needed for fresh water. Pool water at normal chlorine levels is perfectly safe to drink. Chlorine and bleach are the same thing.
 

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Don't pee in the pool!!! ;)
Funny you should mention that. We had a neighbor who had a sign near his pool.
"Welcome to our ool. Notice there is no P in it. Please keep it that way."
 

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Don't forget you can set up a still to separate out any chemicals or just filter and boil if there aren't chemicals in it.

I used to run a swimming pool for a living. The biggest issues with standing water in SHTF would be keeping animals (and therefore harmful bacteria) out and mosquitos... which can not only be a nuisance, but could also theoretically carry malaria depending on where you live.

And for the love of God, if you raise fish or any other animals (frogs, ducks, whatever) in it, DON'T drink it without either distilling it or filtering and boiling it...
 

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I will be setting up a 33' round above ground pool this spring. It holds approximately 22,000 gallons. That will last quite a long time if needed for fresh water. Pool water at normal chlorine levels is perfectly safe to drink. Chlorine and bleach are the same thing.
With chlorinated water, if you put it In a bucket for a day a lot of the clorine will evaporate out
 

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pharmer14, beside chlorine, what other are common chemicals used in pools that we might have to worry about?
 

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There shouldn't be any thing other than chlorine and PH up and or PH down. Neither if which is harmful unless you drink it from the bottle. Those are the only chemicals that I use. (Have had pools all my life). Think about it. Could they use something that could hurt you in a public pool?
 

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I am not expert on the filtration systems available today, . . . but I have a friend who has a medical condition which makes his water he has to drink very important.

He has a little blue bottle filter thingy, . . . he told me if the stuff hits the fan, . . . all he needs is a mud hole full of water, . . . with his filter he is good to go.

That being the case, . . . I'd think applying such a filter to the pool would do you well.

May God bless,
Dwight
 

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pharmer14, beside chlorine, what other are common chemicals used in pools that we might have to worry about?
I ran a municipal pool, so bear that in mind. Most home pools don't always follow the municipal regulations. It's easier to get away with because they don't circulate water through the moving parts continuously. That's a requirement for municipal pools.

Chemicals are used for a few things. The primary reason is disinfection. pH affects the effectiveness of the disinfection, so there are also chemicals that affect pH used in most municipal pools at least. The third and final reason is "hardness." I'll hit each of the three below.

As far as disinfection goes, chlorine is the major one. Some use bromine which operates under the same principle. Some use ozone, but that's extremely rare (due to cost) and for the most part it just bubbles through the water and leaves. They also use Calcium Chloride to alter the water hardness. Too hard? the water scales. Too soft? the water is corrosive. Depending on size, pH is altered with either hydrochloric acid or carbon dioxide to lower the pH. Most pools use baking soda to bring the pH down.

Those are the big ones... Municipal pools are required to keep testing supplies on site in most states. After a bit of reading of the testing supplies, it is simple to test the pool water for these components, but after a few months, the pool is basically full of lake water. The chlorine evaporates out as noted above, and the pH normalizes.

The big thing I would be concerned about is the salt content and biohazards (animal waste or bodies, etc). Just working from my current pharmacy knowledge about the human body and my weekly calcium readings from my pool days, it's safe to say that pool water will definitely dehydrate you much like ocean water does. The biohazards could also cause intense diarrhea and sickness which would not be good. Setting up a still is the safe way to go if you have to drink pool water.

I've seen easy designs for homemade stills of both the boiling and solar variety.

Here's a prefab boiler:

Here's a VERY simple homemade one:

Here's a solar one. These are pretty cool, but probably only effective during the summer or in the southern, tropical, or desert climates.
 

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The other thing to keep in mind is that the longer the SHTF situation, the safer the water is to drink by just filtering and boiling. As you distill out and rain water refills, the salts will be diluted out. Once you can't detect much calcium in the water anymore, you should be good to go.
 
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