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My water pressure has never been great but it has been adequate. When I bought the house the previous owner told me the city put in new lines up to his the property (the street) and told him if he put in a new line from the street into the house his pressure would be a lot better. He never did.

I've been in the house a year and like I said the water pressure was adequate. Within the last month or so the water pressure in the kitchen has decreased. Everything else seems about the same but the kitchen sucks. I know it's not the faucet because I put a brand new one in about 6 months ago.

So what say you? Why has my water pressure in the kitchen gone down recently?
 

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My water pressure has never been great but it has been adequate. When I bought the house the previous owner told me the city put in new lines up to his the property (the street) and told him if he put in a new line from the street into the house his pressure would be a lot better. He never did.

I've been in the house a year and like I said the water pressure was adequate. Within the last month or so the water pressure in the kitchen has decreased. Everything else seems about the same but the kitchen sucks. I know it's not the faucet because I put a brand new one in about 6 months ago.

So what say you? Why has my water pressure in the kitchen gone down recently?
Try checking the aerator on the sink if that is the only place it's happening. Probably it's starting to get a calcium build up.
 

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Is the hot water pressure same as cold water pressure? I recently swapped my water heater thinking it was the source of my pressure issues and it turned out it was the hot water supply line from the heater to the wall that was plugged up.
 

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New hot water tank. Maybe I'll check the lines.

And yes, bad pressure for both hot and cold.

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If it’s a single lever type faucet where one lever controls both the hot and cold water, the problem is either innthe control valve or the aerator screen. Check the screen first.
 

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From what your saying it sounds like gunk in the faucet. If cleaning out the faucet doesn't fix it you need to see if it's a pressure problem or a flow problem. It's easy enough to test the pressure at the supply lines to the faucet and even easier to test the flow.

If the pressure and flow are good at the supply it's your faucet.
If the pressure is good at the supply but the flow is low it's your plumbing.
If the pressure is low it's the city's supply pressure (assuming you don't have a leak somewhere and your not using water somewhere else at the same time).
 

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Put a pressure gauge on the faucet for watering the lawn. At least this will tell you the pressure in the system.
Mine is 72psi.
And, I have found when pipes are replaced, the crap that was in them comes to the path of least resistance. So, you may need to flush the system from highest to lowest points, after you check the kitchen sink faucet for debris in it.
 
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Lot's of good advice here. But my philosophy is to start with the simplest solution and if that doesn't work then work your way backwards.

Is it bad on both the hot and cold? I would start with the aerator. Take you about 2 minutes and you might find an easy fix.
 

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What is the actual house pressure? What is the pressure at the kitchen sink?
 

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New hot water tank. Maybe I'll check the lines.

And yes, bad pressure for both hot and cold.

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What kind of lines...pvc, copper, pex, galvanized?
 

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OK everyone. Pressure is one thing. Flow is another. If you put a gage on the service to the house, and it reads 60 psi. And you put a gage on the sink. With the flow stopped. The pressure will be the same, minus any head loss for height, 1 psi for every 2.31 feet. Most residential structures are not tall enough to realize noticeable head loss.

You have restricted flow.

Check your incoming service pressure.

Then find your flow restriction.
 

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Not sure if this is relevant, but new shower heads for some time now, have restrictions in them. Take them out and your shower is significantly more powerful..
Wonder if the sink faucet has restrictions on them too? Besides the little mesh filter?
 

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Not sure if this is relevant, but new shower heads for some time now, have restrictions in them. Take them out and your shower is significantly more powerful..
Wonder if the sink faucet has restrictions on them too? Besides the little mesh filter?
They do. It's a brass disk with a small hole. This is where the calcium deposits build up.
 

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So tell us what you found out at the sink.
I haven't really had time to look at it.

I dont think most here realize besides working my 8 1/2 hour workday I also have a 4 hour round trip drive to work. This doesn't give me a lot of time to get things done around the house during the week.

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Not sure if this is relevant, but new shower heads for some time now, have restrictions in them. Take them out and your shower is significantly more powerful..
Wonder if the sink faucet has restrictions on them too? Besides the little mesh filter?
Here in CA they definitely do. But my issue just started. Before that the water flow was better.

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