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Here is a picture of one of my Bug Out Bags. This is a 511 Tactical RUSH 24 backpack, set up for .308 rifle and 12 gauge shotgun, and outfitted with a Blackhawk .308 20-round ammo pouch, a Blackhawk 18 round 12 gauge ammo pouch, a GPS pouch, a single stack mag pouch (for .223/5.56 mag), a water bottle carrier, and a Voodoo Tactical front rifle rest (to use the pack as a shooting rest). The backpack is designed to hold 24 hours worth of gear, and is very well made. The shoulder straps also have a sternum strap to keep the shoulder straps from slipping around if you have to scramble. The back pack will also hold a hydration bladder, and has a grab handle that can be used to drag a person who is wearing it if they become incapacitated. You can also route your iPod/iPhone earbuds through the back pack for use on the move. The pack has multiple compartments, and slots and internal organizers for all your miscellaneous gear. It is available in black, sandstone, flat dark earth, or TAC OD. Here is how mine is rigged (I liked this one so much I have another one just like this set up for .223/5.56mm). Great backpack for use as a BOB. I also use this backpack for hunting, which is why I went with the setup it has. I can reach everything I need without opening the BOB, so no risk of dropping things or exposing anything inside to the elements.



Link to the back pack if you want to see further details and inside compartments:

5.11 Tactical RUSH 24 Tactical Backpack | Official 5.11 Site

Not affiliated with the company in any way, just a long-time very happy customer that loves their customer service, equipment and clothing.

Please post pictures of your BOB so others can see how you set yours up. Thanks, fellow preppers and survivalists!
 

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I'm interested in the bags you guys use. Not necessarily what's in them. I'm looking at every store I go into for something reasonably priced yet meets the need. I'm a very basic kind of prepper...I can't bring myself to spend $150 on a backpack - at least not yet.
I might try to hit the military surplus stores today and see what they got...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
There are less expensive back packs available.

You need to assess your needs and stay within your budget. I bought my back pack on sale, so I saved some money, but I wanted a quality back pack because I have used cheaper bags and had them fail. You load these with gear, food, water, ammo, tools, lights, and they are not lightweight. So you also need to consider comfort with a full load. You hump this backpack for ten miles, you begin to understand why it costs more. The back is designed to breathe against your skin when you are sweating, it has rubberized grip points along the bottom to keep the pack from slipping and sliding, rubbing blisters into your shoulders and back. It has seams that are tacked and double stitched with upholstery thread, so it won't fail or burst under load. It has compression straps so you can carry more than you started out with (I hunt, and you may need to pack out meat or other items you gather) and you can tighten it up once it is expanded to secure your larger load.

It has YKK zipper pulls, not all back packs that cost less do. It has MOLLE straps to add pouches, sheaths, and compatible gear. The fabric quality means it withstands wear better and lasts longer.

You have to consider you may be living out of this bag, and you do not want it to come apart when you are counting on it most.

If you are just starting out, and just want a bag to toss in your vehicle, any bag will work. If you want a bag you can throw on your back and walk in for miles, it is worth it to pay for quality. Your body will thank you and your gear will be with you rather than scattered along the trail you just hiked.

But everyone had different needs and different means, so pick what works best for you.
 

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I have most of my bugout stuff except for clothes and personals in small rubbermaid containers. These I keep in my truck. My bugout bag is really just some clothes, a couple of weapons, radio and a flashlight with map and compass. Everything else is all ready to go!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I also use Rubbermaid containers. But I have a two story house and I figured out a great way to quickly load my BOV/truck using various bags.

I use mountain climbing rope and caribiners, hook the caribiners through the carry handles on my bags, tie the rope off to a front tie down hook in my truck bed, and then use the rope and caribiners to zip line my bags into my truck from a second story window. I control the loose end of the rope to control the drop speed of the bag, and it saves me from schlepping bags down the stairs and out the door all the way to the truck. In a wildfire evacuation I can have all my gear loaded in under two minutes based on drills I have run, alone.

Then I load the Rubbermaid containers (I use Action Packers because they latch and are lockable) from the ground floor, then load fuel, food and water, toss in the rifle cases, and bug out.

I can do all of this in five minutes, with the truck prepositioned right where I park it. It takes me longer if I have to load everything solo. But I can be loaded and mobile in under ten minutes with a full load, including trailer for the side by side, and extra fuel, ammo and water cans, including all four quick-cam ties downs on the SxS.

Then I try not to die from a heart attack as I drive away!
 

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I'm putting together a combination emergency/disaster bag/mini BOB.
My tahoe has a lot of the stuff I want already packed up like some tools, emergency roadside kit, first aid kit, gloves, blanket. If I have to go because I'm about to be overrun - social chaos, zombies :), I figure I can have clothes, food, water, and weapons packed in less than 20 minutes for my wife, daughter, and son. Then I hit my mom and my brothers place, and we our outta here.
So my bag needs are not so much as tactical as what many of you are doing.
 

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I also use Rubbermaid containers. But I have a two story house and I figured out a great way to quickly load my BOV/truck using various bags.

I use mountain climbing rope and caribiners, hook the caribiners through the carry handles on my bags, tie the rope off to a front tie down hook in my truck bed, and then use the rope and caribiners to zip line my bags into my truck from a second story window. I control the loose end of the rope to control the drop speed of the bag, and it saves me from schlepping bags down the stairs and out the door all the way to the truck. In a wildfire evacuation I can have all my gear loaded in under two minutes based on drills I have run, alone.

Then I load the Rubbermaid containers (I use Action Packers because they latch and are lockable) from the ground floor, then load fuel, food and water, toss in the rifle cases, and bug out.

I can do all of this in five minutes, with the truck prepositioned right where I park it. It takes me longer if I have to load everything solo. But I can be loaded and mobile in under ten minutes with a full load, including trailer for the side by side, and extra fuel, ammo and water cans, including all four quick-cam ties downs on the SxS.

Then I try not to die from a heart attack as I drive away!
We have similar bug out procedures, except I live on the top floor of an apartment building!!...Seven floors schlepping rubbermaids sucks, so I have them all in the truck/BOL and some clothes and the BOB and I am good!!!....beats carrying everything down all those flights...better keep the medical rubbermaid out for the oxygen!!!....lol
 

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European army surplus, bought from 'Cheaper Than Dirt' when they really were cheap. I'm thinking this one was German. Metal frame and like new. That's my grandson's 'rifle' that he just had to get in the pic. ;-)

 

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IMG_20121230_240620_676.jpg IMG_20121230_240627_230.jpg IMG_20121230_240635_745.jpg

This is a CAP...Corpsman Assault Pack in green MARPAT with additional MOLLE add ons. Panels and pouches can be removed and re-arranged to custom fit it. Plenty of pockets and can hold a lot of crap. I didn't like them so much with the Marines but it makes a great GHB.
 

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I might try to hit the military surplus stores today and see what they got...
Wow...while they had stuff I can't get at Walmart, the stuff they did have that I could get anywhere was waaaay overpriced.

But they did give me some ideas.
And I did buy a boonie hat...it was on sale :)
 

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When you buy... you need to consider what you will use it for. It is truly a 72 hr bag? Or... do you plan on hoofing it for weeks on end? Will you be climbing mountainous terrain with it? Do you want everything inside it... or do you want to hang objects from it? Things like this determine if you need a waist belt (for a lot of weight... i.e., carrying extra items for a small child) or if you can just go with a smaller pack and a chest strap (which I highly recommend...) Of course, these can be added after the fact as well... but a waist belt is usually integral to a pack. Do you want a hard frame, or no frame? Do you want an internal or external frame (so you can pull the pack off and use the frame for carrying other items)? It all depends on how you plan to use it. Learn from others... sure... but buy what you need and can afford, not what someone else has just because they recommend it. Their situation is very different than yours. And... I very much expect that you will buy one... use it, but dislike something about it, and over time will try and buy others. But... have something... even if it's not the "ideal" pack for your situation.
 

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In a quick roundabout it's a Maxpedition Vulture II in OD with a usgi canteen, cup and pouch on the side and a Cold Steel Latin machete on the other. My UglyStick 2 piece also gets tied off with the machete side. That's a usgi poncho liner on top and a Recon III sleeping bag on the bottom strapped off. In the pack is a variety of food, (mre entree's, peanut butter, granola, spice mix, bouillon cubes, etc) and the necessaries for fire, water, shelter, food gathering, mapping, health care, alternative clothing. (OD BDU's) Things like headgear, knives, 550, fishing kit, sewing kit, poncho, gloves, survival books, cards, lighters, firesteel, petroleum jelly soaked cotton balls, vitamins, antibiotics, hygeine supplies, towel, Katadyn mini ceramic water filter, water purification tablets, hand saw, tweezers, nailclippers, cooking utensils, more 550, spare fishing line, flashlight and extra batteries, spare pistol mags, slingshot, etc, etc.
 

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When you buy... you need to consider what you will use it for. It is truly a 72 hr bag? Or... do you plan on hoofing it for weeks on end? Will you be climbing mountainous terrain with it? Do you want everything inside it... or do you want to hang objects from it? Things like this determine if you need a waist belt (for a lot of weight... i.e., carrying extra items for a small child) or if you can just go with a smaller pack and a chest strap (which I highly recommend...) Of course, these can be added after the fact as well... but a waist belt is usually integral to a pack. Do you want a hard frame, or no frame? Do you want an internal or external frame (so you can pull the pack off and use the frame for carrying other items)? It all depends on how you plan to use it. Learn from others... sure... but buy what you need and can afford, not what someone else has just because they recommend it. Their situation is very different than yours. And... I very much expect that you will buy one... use it, but dislike something about it, and over time will try and buy others. But... have something... even if it's not the "ideal" pack for your situation.
That's sound advice.
 

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Adjust your packing list for the season. Extreme cold, summer, and mild temps. No need to carry a -30 degree sleeping bag in June.

IMG_20130211_144110.jpg
 

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Yeah! I've found that surplus stores aren't what they used to be. They aren't places you can find deals anymore. Their only specialty is getting items you can only find there...and you pay for it! I like CheaperThanDirt.com (excpet for ammo).
 

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Yeah! I've found that surplus stores aren't what they used to be. They aren't places you can find deals anymore. Their only specialty is getting items you can only find there...and you pay for it! I like CheaperThanDirt.com (excpet for ammo).
True most all surplus stores sell chinese product made for well, surplus/dollar stores. Try checking our old hardware stores, old western auto stores, go antiquing in small towns where you live, even old run down gas stations that have dusty items on pegboards behind the register. I have found original Stanley tools back when they were made here in the U.S. (Bridgeport, CT) now sold in walmart made in china. The new stuff is not bad, But I picked up the original Stanley tools for the old original faded price and the old guy was gentleman and I was happy to buy all he was willing to sell. I have found old signs, soda crates, Deitz oil lamps, railroad items, Hand pumps and had a blast with family and met some great folks along the way. I hope this helps. Good luck!

punch
 

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True most all surplus stores sell chinese product made for well, surplus/dollar stores. Try checking our old hardware stores, old western auto stores, go antiquing in small towns where you live, even old run down gas stations that have dusty items on pegboards behind the register. I have found original Stanley tools back when they were made here in the U.S. (Bridgeport, CT) now sold in walmart made in china. The new stuff is not bad, But I picked up the original Stanley tools for the old original faded price and the old guy was gentleman and I was happy to buy all he was willing to sell. I have found old signs, soda crates, Deitz oil lamps, railroad items, Hand pumps and had a blast with family and met some great folks along the way. I hope this helps. Good luck!

punch
Remember when you could buy ammo at a feed store and rifles at the Gibsons or Motts five and dimes? Man, I miss those days...and I'm only 38.
 

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Remember when you could buy ammo at a feed store and rifles at the Gibsons or Motts five and dimes? Man, I miss those days...and I'm only 38.
Yup, you could dig out a couple of sks rifles out of a wooden barrel in woolworths in downtown Houston and spend less than a hundred bucks. I thought I had a handy parts/donor gun and ended up with two pretty good rifles. I'm a bit older than you and i miss them days too. You must have great memories of a paw-paw, dad or uncle taking you to those places and teaching hunting and fishing and family traditions.
Thank you for your service TCM, its the gentlemen like you that made it possible for all of us to live in a free country.
But for how much longer? Lets all hang together and work together for those who can't or never made it back because they already did. God Bless you and yours sir. Thank you for your service! And God Bless America.

punch (so glad you made it back to us)
 

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What I learned from setting up this bag is that I need a bigger bag for a full on BOB

2013-02-12 21.26.47.jpg

Here it is all packed up.

2013-02-12 21.31.57.jpg

Fixed blade knife
Holster
Xd 40 + 2 12 round mags
SOG folder
Lansky multitool
Navigation Kit in a waterproof bag: Map, compass, instructions for emergency radio
50 rounds
Mag light
pen & Paper
Sunglasses
Boots + 2 pair extra socks
Pocket saw
50 ft parachord
Beany + Cold weather gloves
Emergency blanket
Fire kit: Bic, striker with magnesium, cotton, waterproof matches, chapstick
Rain Gear
Towel
Extra batteries in dry bag
Pocket stove + 6 fuel pellets
Emergency radio
Back Pack
First aid kit
Camel back 26 oz. Water bottle
 
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