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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All. First legit post here (other than in the Intro forum)
I was just excited to share about my latest prep endeavor. One supply area that I was never happy with was my first aid supplies. I would buy 1 small item here or there, but never had it orderly or inventoried. I looked online at some pre-packaged EMS kits (ALS and BLS kits) and was blown away by the price. I always love how they list those kits by the number of supplies: "Over 350 Pieces!!!"...then 250 of them are just different sized bandaids. So, I set out to put together my own. It took a while....but I'm happy to say that for less than half the cost of those pre-packaged kits, I was able to put together a top notch Home/BO kit that rivals anything I had found online, as well as a kit for each vehicle AND 2 smaller kits that could be tossed in a backpack, range bag, or tackle box.

If you are in the spot I was in....don't be tempted to just drop maximum $$ on those pre-assembles kits. If you take the time and piece your kit together, you are going to be much happier...and have some cash left over to take the wife out for a nice dinner (or buy that bulk box of Lake City 5.56x45's).

Be good. Be safe.
-Mike
 

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Can't argue. With my background, I always put together my own kits. The "buy it kit" always has way too much BS in it and never the stuff you really need.
 

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I'm in the process of doing the same thing. Every time I've looked at ready made kits I felt like I would have to end up adding a bunch of stuff to it anyway. Plus, I'm always looking for a way to save some cash.
 

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I agree too. I might also suggest taking a "capabilities" based approach. Decide what you want to be able to treat, then figure out what supplies will give you that capability.

For example, a "sprains" kit would include some elastic bandages, triangular bandages, and so on. Adding a few assorted SAM splints and other odds and ends would increase the capabilities and make it a "sprains and breaks" kit.

Doing things this way will make it easier to buy just what you need without a lot of unimportant fluff.
 

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Those pre-packaged "first aid kits" are only good for minor cuts and scrapes, that about it. Working in medical sales, I usually get some good stuff from the docs I know, but I actually get a lot of my first aid supplies for my kits from Dollar Tree.
Not sure how much geography they cover, but Walgreens has a pretty decent wall of goodies too. You can buy Mastisol and Steristrips (two of my favorite items) from Amazon, but you can also ask your general practitioner if they have any... some will hook you up, some won't, and it doesn't hurt to ask.
 

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Couldn't agree with your piece of helpful advice more. I went through the same delima when getting set up, I mean really set up.

The dollar store is your friend here! Wally World is a pretty handy resource for this too although not my favorite place to shop. But budget prices are always a good thing. I filled a three day sized camo day pack to the hilt for just a few bucks and could probably go a couple of years before running out of stuff I need. I used the clear flat plastic plano tackle boxes (youd be amazed and how much crap you can cram into one of these!) and small plastic organizing totes from Walmart to organize it all and keep things readily accessable. It worked kick butt although it doesn't look as pretty as the fold out canvas first aid bags with all the whistles and bells, but then it was a helluva lot cheaper too!
 

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If you need something a little more compact another good item to assemble your first aid kit in is one of those "Tournment Worm Fishing Bags" the Bass Pros on the circuit sometimes use. Just buy an extra bag of spare slips to go in it. The heavy duty zip lock bags hold a lot, hold it in a organized manor and make everything easily accessible. They don't weight much, they are easily cleaned and they can be crammed into the nooks and crannies of anyone backpack. Just a thought to consider for those going this route...
 

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Anyone willing to put a list up of what they have in their put together first aid kit? I would like to take a look at it as I am trying to do the same thing right now but finding it hard!

Thanks
Brandon
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Anyone willing to put a list up of what they have in their put together first aid kit? I would like to take a look at it as I am trying to do the same thing right now but finding it hard!

Thanks
Brandon
Brandon, I have an full inventoried list of stuff, although it's not with me at the moment. But I'll try to list, from memory, most of what I put together:
Various size gauze pads, all sterile (2x2, 3x3,4x4) Probably 80 in total
Gauze wrap (20 yards total)
3 rolls medical tape
Ace bandages (various sizes)
non-stick sterile pads (for burns)
Butterflys (20)
tons of bandaids (various sizes and uses..waterproof, knuckle bandages, etc.)
finger splints
rubber gloves
zip lock bags
tongue depressors
50% isopropyl Alcohol (32 oz)
hydrogen peroxide (32 oz)
Burn cream
tea tree oil
rescue inhaler
triple antibiotic ointment
various OTC meds
Vaseline
cotton balls
cotton swabs
cleansing wipes
earloop face masks
waterproof matches/lighter (to sterilize stuff)
tweezers
shears
safety pins
super glue (good for closing wounds in a pinch)
eye cup
LifeStraw
multi-tool
wrapped hard candies
paracord (there's just so many uses for the stuff, I put lengths of this in every pack/case/vehicle that I have)
$$ (I stick a $20 in just about every pack/bag/gear box I have...you never know when you need some cash fast)
headlamp w extra batteries

I'm sure there's a bunch of stuff that forgot to mention, but that's a good start. There's still stuff that I need to add, Quikclot, of example...and then there's some next level stuff that I will be adding over time (suture kit, IV stuff, epipen, prescription antibiotics).

hope this helps.
 

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Anyone willing to put a list up of what they have in their put together first aid kit? I would like to take a look at it as I am trying to do the same thing right now but finding it hard!
What are you building your kit for? The best thing to do first is determine the scenario you're expecting (long hikes? climbs? fights with animals? people?) and then imagine the kind of injuries you could incur. Then read, watch or be taught how to take care of those injuries and you will know exactly what equipment you need.

My kit is built to be a lightweight 'jack of all trades, master of none' though it has a decided tendency towards trauma.

Kit Contents;

Survival Blanket (1)
Medical Forceps, 6" (1)
Moleskin, 2"x2" (2)
Glowstick (1)
Nitrile Gloves (2)
Safety Pins (2)
Lip Balm (2)
Aspirin, 2 325mg (2)
Ibuprofen, 2 325mg (2)
Antiseptic Wipes (6)
Triple Antibiotic Ointment (2)
Datrex Emergency Water (1, for irrigation or dehydration)
Povidone Iodine, 3/4 oz (1)
10cc Irrigation Syringe w/ 18g tip (1)
Gauze, 4"x4" (2)
Gauze, 2"x2" (4)
Skin Tac Topical Adhesive (2)
3M Steristrips, 1/4"x3" pkg of 3 (10)
Curad Butterfly Bandages (6)
Dentek Temparin (1)
 

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I would also recommend you take a first aid and CPR class from the Red Cross or American Heart Association. Having all that stuff is wonderful, but unless you know how to use it properly you won't be nearly as effective at helping yourself or someone in need of medical treatment. I've run into a lot of people who have tried to self diagnose or treat themselves while working as a Paramedic that really didn't do themselves a lot of good and I had to undo the poor job they did do before I could start helping them the correct way.
 

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I would also recommend you take a first aid and CPR class from the Red Cross or American Heart Association. Having all that stuff is wonderful, but unless you know how to use it properly you won't be nearly as effective at helping yourself or someone in need of medical treatment. I've run into a lot of people who have tried to self diagnose or treat themselves while working as a Paramedic that really didn't do themselves a lot of good and I had to undo the poor job they did do before I could start helping them the correct way.
If you go with Red Cross try one of their Wilderness classes. You'll actually learn some first aid; most of the other classes are basic triage and "how to call 911".
 
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