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Perhaps one reason I'm a fairly easy going guy that doesn't get worked up over a lot of stuff boils down to perspective.
A guy I was in a VA therapy group for PTSD with said something I'll never forget. "After Vietnam, every day is Christmas."
I've forgotten his name, I remember he was in the 173rd Airborne.

 

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What got you through it, RPD...?
if you knew what I thought the war was all about at the time, when I was a little kid you'd laugh.
Until my best friend and neighbor's big brother came home in a body bag, I hadn't a clue. You could say my perspective changed after that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
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Much Respect to an Vet that served in Vietnam. I'm a Navy brat, Dad was 21+ years. I remember him being gone as a little kid, he served on flat tops. My Uncle, Dads brother did three tours in country as a gunner on Hueys, got shot down several times; twice in one day. I always thought he was a little crazy as I was growing up, he died several years ago.

RPD, you vets are some tough SOB's. Hats off to ya and many Thanks!!!!

http:www.youtube.com/watch?v=3c7GqpoM6wU
 

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After few tours in Iraq/Afghanistan part of initial invasion March 19/20 2003 in Iraq as infantryman 2 weeks out of basic/AIT, my perspective is if the time served during all that didn't kill me than I can survive anything except when it's my time it's my time. It's a thrill that can never be matched and believe I'm only alive through luck, supposed to been dead multiple times. Done what I have wanted to in life for 15 years in the service anything after that is just extra to me, I wasn't supposed to made it this far.
With PTSD I learned pills won't help you, only time and learning how to live again will, you have to adjust your life or it will kill you in the end.
 

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My father grew up on a farm in Northwest Florida along with another nine siblings where he chopped and picked cotton, grew and trucked truckloads of watermelons to Mississippi, among other things. He joined the Army to go to the Korean War. Sure, it wasn't a joy, being in a war, especially in an infantry unit, but got three hot meals a day when possible and he liked the food. He stayed in, went aviation, found himself in Vietnam as a first sergeant in an ASB unit. I remember how disciplined he was before he left. He came back the same man. He retired from the Army after serving 22 years.

He didn't drink or smoke pot, he's never gone to the V.A. for mental therapy and has never joined any veterans groups. He had open heart surgery in 1981. The heart doc said his heart disease was due to years of stress.

He and my mother watch a little news and then they watch Bonanza if there isn't a Braves game on T.V. They still clean their own yard because, I'd rather do it myself then supervise you or anyone else."
 

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After few tours in Iraq/Afghanistan part of initial invasion March 19/20 2003 in Iraq as infantryman 2 weeks out of basic/AIT, my perspective is if the time served during all that didn't kill me than I can survive anything except when it's my time it's my time. It's a thrill that can never be matched and believe I'm only alive through luck, supposed to been dead multiple times. Done what I have wanted to in life for 15 years in the service anything after that is just extra to me, I wasn't supposed to made it this far.
With PTSD I learned pills won't help you, only time and learning how to live again will, you have to adjust your life or it will kill you in the end.
Thanks for your service, Weldman. May God bless you so very much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
After few tours in Iraq/Afghanistan part of initial invasion March 19/20 2003 in Iraq as infantryman 2 weeks out of basic/AIT, my perspective is if the time served during all that didn't kill me than I can survive anything except when it's my time it's my time. It's a thrill that can never be matched and believe I'm only alive through luck, supposed to been dead multiple times. Done what I have wanted to in life for 15 years in the service anything after that is just extra to me, I wasn't supposed to made it this far.
With PTSD I learned pills won't help you, only time and learning how to live again will, you have to adjust your life or it will kill you in the end.
PTSD never goes away. The brain chemistry, how the brain works and processes things, is permanently changed.
Especially the deep inner cortex that controls the automatic functions. For example, one thing I have the VA calls an "exagerated startle response", especially to sudden unexpected bright flashes of light.
I have seen MRI's of normal brains and PTSD brains. PTSD is real.

Time, abstinence from any mind altering drug or alcohol, and my faith have given me an inner peace I never had before.
 

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Thanks for your service, Weldman. May God bless you so very much.
You're welcome and thanks for your support

PTSD never goes away. The brain chemistry, how the brain works and processes things, is permanently changed.
Especially the deep inner cortex that controls the automatic functions. For example, one thing I have the VA calls an "exagerated startle response", especially to sudden unexpected bright flashes of light.
I have seen MRI's of normal brains and PTSD brains. PTSD is real.

Time, abstinence from any mind altering drug or alcohol, and my faith have given me an inner peace I never had before.
Yeah I had one of those scans in at Houston VA and seen same thing, part of the brain that is usually cool in temperature in certain area unless startled with adrenaline pumping is always active and hot. It's one of the reasons I left the meds, learned of what you speak of so I found out what triggered mine and moved across the US to learn to live again. Heat sand, stress, loud noises I didn't make or weren't expecting, sudden movements by people and too many people. If I don't have something to do I will slip backwards which makes being rated a percentage for it hard to be on it.
 

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I like to tell this story about "Perspective"

Son1 had Cancer(Leukemia) when he was 5 years old. He underwent Chemo for 3 years and Radiation Treatments for 14 days while going through Chemo. He went bald, was often sick, became bloated from the medicine and was generally in compromised immune situation for much of the 3 years. One year he spent over 50 days in the hospital. We tried to maintain a normal life during this time. It was over 25 years ago, here is my story on perspective...

So during Son1's cancer treatments a good friend of mine came to visit one weekend to play a bunch of golf, grill some steaks, drink some beer and relax with me and my family. He and I played a Friday round of golf and stunk it up on the course. Nothing went right that day golfwise.

We come back to the house, fire up the grill, crack open some beers and start bitching and moaning about our horrible day playing golf. Mind you we were both relatively young men, in great health, playing with expensive golf clubs at an expensive golf course...yet we bitched and complained over more than a few beers.

Son1 is sitting there listening to his Dad and his buddy go on and on about how hard this "game" was and finally asks an innocent question as only a small, weak-enned bald headed 5 year old cancer patient can ask..."Dad", said Son1, "is golf hard?"

"Heck yeah, golf is hard Son", I answered, "toughest game I've ever played and I've played them all!" My buddy echos my view and we start to complain again...meanwhile...

Son1 thinks about this for a second or two, then asks..."Dad, Is golf harder than Leukemia and Chemo-Therapy?" ..............SILENCE...... ..... ....... ....... ......

Still makes me tear up a bit telling that story. Its all perspective isn't it?

(For those of you that don't know our story, Son1 was lucky and strong and beat Leukemia and was officially cured 7 years later. He is a thriving strong young man today. I think he still bench presses nearly 400lbs and is a happily married working man who is a part time physical fitness nut and gym rat. So happy ending but perspective was certainly taught to us over 25 years ago....)
 

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PTSD never goes away. The brain chemistry, how the brain works and processes things, is permanently changed.
Especially the deep inner cortex that controls the automatic functions. For example, one thing I have the VA calls an "exagerated startle response", especially to sudden unexpected bright flashes of light.
I have seen MRI's of normal brains and PTSD brains. PTSD is real.

Time, abstinence from any mind altering drug or alcohol, and my faith have given me an inner peace I never had before.
Right-O you are. There are too many people with PTSD that think it'll go back to how it was. Thats like trying to unbake bread. The chemical process has occurred and now you gotta learn to live with it. But I also think too many people use it as a crutch or as an excuse to drink and do drugs. Hell I have.
More to the point of the OP....Vietnam, Korean, WWII vets were my heroes. Not just the Sgt Yorks or Audi Murphy's...I mean the everyday guys and gals serving.

People forgot how hard it was to live back then. You come back from war and have the damnest time just trying to keep food on the table, and pretty soon you learn to live with your new normal. Today folks have it easier, which allows vets to dwell on their issues iinstead of face them post-haste and get on with living.

Thanks for doing it before I had to guys, cause your the reason I did it afterwards.

"Draw inspiration from other people's lives The inspiring example of the people you admire is a great place to start with." Nathan Arthur,
 

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PTSD never goes away...Time, abstinence from any mind altering drug or alcohol, and my faith have given me an inner peace I never had before.
I'm not a vet but a couple of quotes spring to mind that encourage people to try to let unhappy memories go and move on-

1- "What happens in the field stays in the field" Anon Nam soldier

2- God said-
"Forget the former things; do not dwell on the past.
See, I am doing a new thing! Now it springs up; do you not perceive it?
I am making a way in the desert and streams in the wasteland"
(Isaiah 43:18 )
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm not a vet but a couple of quotes spring to mind that encourage people to try to let unhappy memories go and move on-

1- "What happens in the field stays in the field" Anon Nam soldier

2- God said-
"Forget the former things; do not dwell on the past.
See, I am doing a new thing! Now it springs up; do you not perceive it?
I am making a way in the desert and streams in the wasteland"
(Isaiah 43:18 )
Sorry, but repeated traumatic experiences over and over change the brain chemistry - the actual way the brain functions.
It is what it is.
One simply learns to live with it. There is no "let unhappy memories go and move on."
 

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Sorry, but repeated traumatic experiences over and over change the brain chemistry - the actual way the brain functions.
It is what it is.
One simply learns to live with it. There is no "let unhappy memories go and move on."
i wish psychologists would do a study of PTSD sometime to try to pin down what sort of people are most susceptible to it.
After all I suppose only a relatively small number of people are affected by it but the majority are not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
i wish psychologists would do a study of PTSD sometime to try to pin down what sort of people are most susceptible to it.
After all I suppose only a relatively small number of people are affected by it but the majority are not.
You have absolutely no clue about what you are talking about.
 

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You have absolutely no clue about what you are talking about.
Well let the facts do the talking-

Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF): About 11-20 out of every 100 Veterans (or between 11-20%) who served in OIF or OEF have PTSD in a given year.

Gulf War (Desert Storm): About 12 out of every 100 Gulf War Veterans (or 12%) have PTSD in a given year.

Vietnam War: About 15 out of every 100 Vietnam Veterans (or 15%) were currently diagnosed with PTSD at the time of the most recent study in the late 1980s, the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study (NVVRS). It is estimated that about 30 out of every 100 (or 30%) of Vietnam Veterans have had PTSD in their lifetime

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/understand/common/common_veterans.asp

So like I said, psychologists should analyse why some get PTSD and the majority don't, and draw useful conclusions from it.
 

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i wish psychologists would do a study of PTSD sometime to try to pin down what sort of people are most susceptible to it.
After all I suppose only a relatively small number of people are affected by it but the majority are not.
I expect everyone is susceptible to it. Perhaps you should volunteer to perform arduous duties in a war zone and see what your threshold is.
 

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You have absolutely no clue about what you are talking about.
Huh you try to be nice..:)
PS- a lady once said to me "You're very good with people, would you like to join us in the Samaritans?" but I had to decline because I couldn't just sit there on the phone listening like a dummy and let others do all the talking.
So I became an independent "Internet Samaritan" instead, and get good feedback from people like this-

Spannerose - "I would like you to know that the result of reading your posts I am left with the desire to pick up my bible for the first time in years"
ChildofLight - "So good to read your responses, some are quite witty and made LOL"
HenryS - "You are brilliant in finding appropriate phrases. Another one of your superb emails to store"
Sarah4Jesus - "Listen to him, he is a great teacher"
Kierri - "That was one of the best explanations I've ever heard!"
Haimehenmmli - "I LOVE IT MATE!!! I'm going to put it into my files, with some of my other favorites, from you"
Saipan1777 - "Spot on, bravo"
Ainglkiss - "You write so well. Keep up the great work"
BlessedOne - "Glad to have you here! Jesus is the way!"
MonkGirl - "Wow, thank you! That is really comforting...and all I really needed to hear!"
JeffC - "HELL YEAH! PREACH IT BROTHER, THE REALITY WAY! (LUV YUR STYLE....)"
Honeybearx - "This was very good reading thank you"
Megan - "I just wanted to tell you that I loved this story, it was very touching"
Allisoneness -"You are the one true Christian on here, keep up the good work and praise the Lord"
Sherry Anne - " i love your posts"
Antipas - "Brilliant yet again"
Easynote - "ROFL you are pure class, another of your timeless classics!"
Kermit - "RIGHT ON THE MONEY AND FUNNY, TOO"
Chrysalis55- "Just want to say, I love your posts and your messages not only inspire me, sometimes they make me laugh"
Evenflow- I just LOVE this post You have made me smile BIG TIME this morning. Good for you and what a great attitude you have to life xx"
Luismtzzz- "I like how you reason religion. I am enjoying your answers"
Justforme- "I am so happy to meet a sensible Christian"
Apple Pie - "Come on over to 4church, we could do with your input and your humour"
Lillian - "please come back..it's nice having you on the board"


I suppose my Christian strength must rub off on others..:)

"As iron sharpens iron, so one person sharpens another" (Bible: Proverbs 7:17)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Well let the facts do the talking-

Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF): About 11-20 out of every 100 Veterans (or between 11-20%) who served in OIF or OEF have PTSD in a given year.

Gulf War (Desert Storm): About 12 out of every 100 Gulf War Veterans (or 12%) have PTSD in a given year.

Vietnam War: About 15 out of every 100 Vietnam Veterans (or 15%) were currently diagnosed with PTSD at the time of the most recent study in the late 1980s, the National Vietnam Veterans Readjustment Study (NVVRS). It is estimated that about 30 out of every 100 (or 30%) of Vietnam Veterans have had PTSD in their lifetime

https://www.ptsd.va.gov/understand/common/common_veterans.asp

So like I said, psychologists should analyse why some get PTSD and the majority don't, and draw useful conclusions from it.
What is today callled PTSD has been around since ancient times. The Greeks wrote about it.
It has been studied for a thousand years or more.

Here in America, in the Civil War it was known as Soldiers Heart. WWI it was called Shell Shock. WWII it was Combat Fatigue.
Vietnam it was Post Vietnam Syndrome.

Psychiatrists have linked the severity of PTSd to the subjects mental health before the traumatic incidents.
The healthiest have worse symptoms, those who were psychotic before had the least or none at all.

Nope. You do not know diddly squat about PTSD.
 
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