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I had the same problem (hard frost Fri & Sat night). The frost got the tops of my peppers and potato plants, thru the tarp covering them. Everything else in the garden is a goner.
Overall, I'm happy, the garden produced fairly well considering it was a new garden plot location this year.
I did struggle with blight on all plants except the raised beds which was filled with dirt my neighbor had excavated from enlarging his pond.
The main (new location) garden is an old sand volleyball court. It was overgrown for approx 5 yrs. I had roto-tilled the same dirt, from my neighbors pond, into it.
Like I said the raised beds were great, I think the blight was in the sandy soil. Anybody have any thoughts on that? It would be appreciated.
I have been fighting tomato blight for years now but this year I had better success than ever before. I bought some quality fungal spray from AGWAY. I exactly followed directions and sprayed every 7 to 10 days starting when the plants were only about 12 inches high. I mulched around the tomato plants with straw. And as soon as possible after the plants started growing, I started trimming away all branches close to the ground. Right now my plants are about done but every plant is bare from the ground up 2 feet. Of course this makes the plants extremely top heavy so I use cages made from cattle panels, 2 foot square and 5 feet tall. Cages are also anchored at corners with concrete rebars hammered into the ground. I did get some blight so I kept diseased parts trimmed away and discarded the trimmings into the garbage (not the mulch pile). This method has given me the best results ever.
 

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I plant basil in among the tomatoes with great results. I haven't paired it with peppers yet but i will try that next season.

Just checked the garden and last nites frost (second nite in a row) nailed my tomatoes hard and burned the tops of the peppers thru the sheets I had covering them. Weatherman says we're up for another frost tonite. If so, I guess I will harvest the bell peppers green and freeze for use as stuffed peppers. And that will finish off my garden for 2020. What a stinky year. Only 2 zucchini and a very few red peppers. Failure of the sweet potato experiment. Zero peaches and pears. A miserable raspberry harvest. And finally maybe a dozen apples total. A late frost in springtime and an early frost now has really screwed the pooch. Maybe next year will be better.
We had frost last 3 nights, maybe tonight too? I covered all sensitive stuff with lumber covers and dug up some peppers. My basil got a bit singed so I added another cover 2nd night of frost.

Late spring cold did not get my orchard blossoms, but I have 4-5 bears that have been at my berries in summer and then into my orchard, they ate almost all my peaches. They can really damage things when they start ripping trees down.

I have a bear tag and hope to have bear lard, a rug, and some meat soon. A friend also hunts, I hope to remove a couple as they get imprinted on food sources and will be a scourge in the future.

My MLers are charged up with big lead conicals, loaded for bear. The 58 shoots a 525gr, kicks worse than a shotgun with goose loads.
 

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Those must be Yankee peppers. :) My plants are like 3-4' tall.
They will get that size inside this winter. We can't put them out safely until after Memorial day here.

I have taken some of these potted ones and grew them several years. The stalks get woody almost like a shrub. Can do that with tomatoes but stick with deterninate varieties, indeterminate get like an invasive vine too big for in the house. It's nice having Yankee peppers and tomatoes the middle of winter.
 

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Thanks for the tip on AGWAY, I will definetly look into that. I have to do something.
My tomato plants ended up with no leaves up to about 2 feet also due to me plucking the effected blighted areas off the plant. They were all caged.
My vine plants, cuccumbers, squash, watermelon, etc. seemed to be fine until August hit and then they became affected.
I feel I may have over watered at times due to the dry spells. I am going to change the timing of watering to mornings instead of evenings so the foilage will dry quicker rather than stay wet most of the night.
I still suspect the blight is in the sandy soil. I read different ways to attack that, but it would affect my planting....

Thanks Chiefster23
 

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Thanks for the tip on AGWAY, I will definetly look into that. I have to do something.
My tomato plants ended up with no leaves up to about 2 feet also due to me plucking the effected blighted areas off the plant. They were all caged.
My vine plants, cuccumbers, squash, watermelon, etc. seemed to be fine until August hit and then they became affected.
I feel I may have over watered at times due to the dry spells. I am going to change the timing of watering to mornings instead of evenings so the foilage will dry quicker rather than stay wet most of the night.
I still suspect the blight is in the sandy soil. I read different ways to attack that, but it would affect my planting....

Thanks Chiefster23
How much & how often do you water??? And do you scratch down in the soil an inch or two, to see if plants really need watered???

Yes, mornings are the best time to water so it has a chance to soak in to the roots, before the heat evaporates it......and that's another thing, water deeply instead of shallow because the roots will go where the water is. If you're watering lightly and often, it makes for shallow roots whereas a good soaking, less often helps with deeper rooting system.

But with sandy soil, you'd probably still have to water more often. Compost and lots of it.....leaves, wood chips, shavings or bark, straw, kitchen & garden scraps, wood ashes, even cardboard & newspaper.....anything that comes out of the ground, can go right back in.
 
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