Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,078 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have an opportunity to receive an old 200 gallon oil tank that I'm considering using for gasoline storage. I figure some farmers and ranchers may be doing something like this. I figure to take one or two gas cans with me each time I fill the vehicle, which means slowly building volume 5 or 10 gallons at a time.
No where to put it except in back yard in the shade. Fill-cap spring is broken. Will replacing it with same be acceptable for expansion/pressure relief in summer? How about keeping gas quality up/stabilized? Anyone have experience with such?

Ideas/Pros/Cons?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
900 Posts
Sorry cant answer any of these questions, but have one of my own. Do you need to have a ground in case of a spark? lightening or what ever?

I fill 5-5 gal cans every week when I fill up the car. Every body fills gas cans for yard work and stuff right? not at all suspicious.
 

·
Mod Squad
Joined
·
2,260 Posts
Probably not the easy answer you wanted, but if nobody else provides you with the info you are both looking for, take a look at...

FM 10-67-1 Concepts and Equipment of Petroleum Operations

Bulk storage tanks of 55 gallons or greater are subject to federal regulation under 40 CFR 112. A quick summary can be found HERE. Can you say, "Many hoops to jump through?"

And it gets better.... Bulk storage tanks "...are primarily regulated by states. The requirements can usually found in environmental regulations and/or the fire code. There may be a requirement to paint the tank, or a fill pipe, a certain color to identify its contents, provide alarms in addition to those Federally required, and registration of the tank."

I wouldn't store gasoline in anything bigger than 30 gallon drums myself. You might get away with it, but if they catch you, it could be costly.

My home heating oil tank sprung a leak when I lived in Connecticut. I didn't notice it, but the fuel delivery guy did. He called the EPA as was required by law, and I got tagged with a $4,800 environmental spill cleanup bill. All I'm saying is be careful, these guy will take great joy in raping you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,176 Posts
Seems like the gas now days is only good for 3-4 months and it goes bad. At least in the 5 gallon cans I have for the lawn mowers. I wouldn't buy 200 gallons and store it.
I've purchased a couple 30 gallon tanks off semi reefer trailers, 50 bucks. Nice lite weight aluminum and the threaded ends are standard pipe fittings. Just turned the mounting brackets around and mounted them onto a couple four by fours for a stand. Throw them into the back of the pickup and go fill them up and I unload them with the tractor bucket. I only use them for diesel for the trucks and tractor. You can get up to 150 gallon tanks off the trucks but they are a little to big to handle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
In order to do something like that out in the open there is licensing and all kinds of garbage that needs to go with it... on a tank that big you will need to place a wire of some sort to a metal stake in the ground as a ground for said stprage container... then it will need to be painted charry apple red color and then it will need a flamable hazmat sticker applied... then the container will need to go through inspection to make sure it is properly insulated to handle a large amount of gas at one time.... then as stated in prior messages, all the warning bells and whistles and whatever.... so if you could find another place to put it I would.... I would place it right next to the garage under a rain gutter and make it look like a water catch system of sorts.... thats what my buddies uncle does anyway... he stores diesel in his container and has yet to be questioned.... I like the idea and will be doing that myself when I can... not sure I like water running on it though... who knows....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,086 Posts
There are chemicals that will stabilize gasoline. One brand name is Stabil but there are others. In my state you have to have a "catch basin" under the tank if it is above ground, proper grounding wires, fire equipment, and it has to be licensed and inspected. Corrosion is your worst enemy and you will either continually battle it or you will be paying for the clean-up when it fails. Underground tanks (new construction) have to be in a leak proof vault so that checking the tank for leaks is done in the outer vault or tank.

The regulations make it untenable for private use unless you have equipment that makes it necessary. Most of the farms around here use leased tanks and the company maintains them.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Prepadoodle

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,073 Posts
Through work I was able to grab some 16 gallon drums that were brand new and had hydraulic oil in them. Gave them a good clean up and then started bringing home 5-10 gallons of fuel at good prices until they were filled. Always used STA-BIL. At about 6 months I started using one in the cars, snow-blower, lawn mower, etc. I eventually had 3 drums always filled and one being used. In addition I have 80 gallons, with Sta-Bil, in my motor home. I have been filling the motorhome this way for 15 years and have never had a problem with the fuel. I like the small drums because if necessary I can man-handle them into my little SUV and pull it behind my motorhome. Sta-Bil works for me, never a problem.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,112 Posts
You don't want to store gas. It goes bad pretty quickly. That's why I like my bicycle.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top