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Howdy from rural Virginia. I'm very new to prepping. I know I need to prep more than food, but I though that would be a good place to start. I have question:

Most folks seem to prep food by incrementally purchasing more of what they buy at the grocery store until they build up a 30 day (then more) backlog of basic foods. I have a different idea. I regularly donate money to the local food bank for the underprivileged in my area. If I switch that over to _food_ donations instead of _money_ donations, can't I turn my food pantry into a tax-deductible food store?

The idea is this. At the beginning of the year, I buy my 30 day supply of food goods. Before the end of the tax year, I buy another 30 day supply, then donate the now-almost-1-yo foods to the food bank. That way, I am using the same money I would normally donate as a tax-advantaged prep supply.

My question is this --> does anyone else do this and/or does anyone see downsides to this? Am I missing something?

The way I see it, it's a donation I would make anyway (just in a different "tender"), storing the food for almost the full year at my house gives me "prepper" advantages, and the food bank will give the food out for almost immediate consumption, so being 1 year closer to its expiration date should not matter to them.
 

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Welcome to PF from NC , go ask the food bank your question , they would be able to tell you .
 
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Targetshooter - Thx! The food bank is OK with everything. I suppose I wonder if I'm missing something from a prepping perspective? Does this fail under some circumstance?
 

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I think so, too, inceptor. I have almost nothing prepped now - a bit of food and fuel. My thought was to prep for 30 days first, bringing up food, water, fuel, medicine, communications, power, supplies, etc. up to that level first, then extend all of them in sync. Is it better to do it another way? Take care of more food first, for example?
 

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I think so, too, inceptor. I have almost nothing prepped now - a bit of food and fuel. My thought was to prep for 30 days first, bringing up food, water, fuel, medicine, communications, power, supplies, etc. up to that level first, then extend all of them in sync. Is it better to do it another way? Take care of more food first, for example?
You need some kind of protection , what do you have in that order ? 30 days is a very good start , then work it up to a 60 , 120 , 240 day supply , just remember you need to stock up for each person in your family " wife , kids " . It take time so don't rush it , before you know it you will be set .
 

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I do not own firearms. I don't come from a firearm-owning family, though I've been learning by hanging out with my wife's relatives. Recently, I've been test firing with them. Everything from pistols (9 mm Baretta, a .22 Ruger, .357 Mag, some fancy composite HK) to rifles (22's and a Soviet Mosin–Nagant) to assault weapons (AR-15 & AR-10). My favorites of the bunch are the Baretta and the AR-15. But I don't think I'd buy those first.

I'm not a hunter, and I live in a very safe neighborhood. My calculation is that I really only need (and want to access) firearms in the event of a prepper-type situation. I lean towards starting with a pump Mossberg 500 or Remington 870 shotgun with a variety of ammo (buck + slugs). Seems like these guns cover the widest array of uses of anything I can find. Then maybe after I've got enough prepped in other categories, move to 22LR weapons like a US Survival AR7 rifle and a .22 Ruger. Then buy up a bunch of 22LR ammo. As much fun as the AR's are to fire, they'd be well down my list of utility guns since I'm just getting started with basic prepping.
 

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You could be in a safe neighborhood now but what happens when your neighbors get hungry and you're not? Do you think they'll just starve and leave you alone?

If you store something without a way to protect it, you are just keeping it for someone else. I know it sounds harsh but it's the truth.
 

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don't have idea how you intend to handle the logistics ....

most food banks don't accept expired food - you'll have to buy & store food accordingly ....

you do know that the expiration dates have no basis in the real world - just more gooberment boondoggle
 

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Pete,

From what I know of charitable deductions according to the US Tax Code, the only thing that matters is the year that you donate. So if you make a $100 purchase of canned food on January 1, keep the receipt and donate the food on December 31 of the same year, you will qualify depending on your income etc. If you use a tax software program like Turbo Tax, it will tell you what the parameters are. It is the date that you donate not the date that you buy that is important to the IRS.

Makes sense to me.

As far as your stance on guns, well I can't say I agree with you on that but I guess the zombie biker marauders need some easy targets out there too!!!:vs_wave:

Howdy from rural Virginia. I'm very new to prepping. I know I need to prep more than food, but I though that would be a good place to start. I have question:

Most folks seem to prep food by incrementally purchasing more of what they buy at the grocery store until they build up a 30 day (then more) backlog of basic foods. I have a different idea. I regularly donate money to the local food bank for the underprivileged in my area. If I switch that over to _food_ donations instead of _money_ donations, can't I turn my food pantry into a tax-deductible food store?

The idea is this. At the beginning of the year, I buy my 30 day supply of food goods. Before the end of the tax year, I buy another 30 day supply, then donate the now-almost-1-yo foods to the food bank. That way, I am using the same money I would normally donate as a tax-advantaged prep supply.

My question is this --> does anyone else do this and/or does anyone see downsides to this? Am I missing something?

The way I see it, it's a donation I would make anyway (just in a different "tender"), storing the food for almost the full year at my house gives me "prepper" advantages, and the food bank will give the food out for almost immediate consumption, so being 1 year closer to its expiration date should not matter to them.
 

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Welcome to the group from Southern Arizona.
Land of Sun, Surf, and Sand.
Ok, I lied, no surf, but enough sand to shovel
Into all the dang sand bags I’ll ever need!
Grab a stump and sit a spell. I’d offer you a beer,
but I don’t know if you’re of legal drinking age.
So why don’t you tell us a bit about yourself, like what
state you’re from and anything else you might like to share.

The only question I have is will the Food Bank give you some kind of receipt for the food?
It seems that this would only give you a 30 day supply of food which is better than 3 days.
Initial purchase of food that is the same you would normally eat is a good way to go because
you can keep it in your regular pantry and "rotate" the cans so your "stash" is alway fresh. I
did for the first couple of years.
 

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Hello and welcome from Ontario :vs_wave:

I'd imagine your tax receipts work much like ours, or so it sounds, so I'd say it's a good idea for rotation of foods you won't be eating yourself. Just watch your dates, as noted. It all must fall in the same calendar year.

Other than that, I'd echo the others' advice - 30 days worth is nice now, but you should look to extend it in time. And a way to protect you and yours is more important than we'd like to admit to ourselves. If not firearms right now, look in to other security measures. There are a few ideas on the subject throughout the forum :)
 

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Donating the food that is close to expiration is an excellent idea. Even though canned food is edible for many years after the expiration, donating it will let you recoup some of your money. Just make sure that you get a receipt from the organization for taxes. I recommend that you donate to the Salvation Army. The Salvation Army helps a lot of people. When I was a young man with a young family I received help from them.

Don't just consider short term food though. You can make long term food with Mylar bags, 5 gallon buckets and oxygen absorbers. Food like white rice, beans, mashed potatoes and other foods last a long time, decades.

Take a look at this thread and see what you can use.
http://www.prepperforums.net/forum/general-prepper-survival-talk/14970-where-begin-new-prepper.html
 

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Your plan will work and is definitely legal, only your income will decide your potential tax credits. I do suggest that you do not tell anybody you that you secretly fantasize about being known as Pete The Prepper, they might think you are off your rocker.
 

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Welcome to the forum from a fellow Virginian!
 

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Howdy from rural Virginia. I'm very new to prepping. I know I need to prep more than food, but I though that would be a good place to start. I have question:

Most folks seem to prep food by incrementally purchasing more of what they buy at the grocery store until they build up a 30 day (then more) backlog of basic foods. I have a different idea. I regularly donate money to the local food bank for the underprivileged in my area. If I switch that over to _food_ donations instead of _money_ donations, can't I turn my food pantry into a tax-deductible food store?

The idea is this. At the beginning of the year, I buy my 30 day supply of food goods. Before the end of the tax year, I buy another 30 day supply, then donate the now-almost-1-yo foods to the food bank. That way, I am using the same money I would normally donate as a tax-advantaged prep supply.

My question is this --> does anyone else do this and/or does anyone see downsides to this? Am I missing something?

The way I see it, it's a donation I would make anyway (just in a different "tender"), storing the food for almost the full year at my house gives me "prepper" advantages, and the food bank will give the food out for almost immediate consumption, so being 1 year closer to its expiration date should not matter to them.
Ok, I tend to be the prepping bull in the china shop, so here goes

We don't know anything about you, where you live how old you are and how many dependents you have... Which is the key component.

With that being said, hahahhahahaahaahhahahahahhahaahhahahahhahahahahhaha

My fingers are getting tired, REALLY a 30 day supply is ok with you?

IF you have that you are more prepared than others, but for most here it is a starting point not a goal.

I am using cans of food that expired in 2014 currently and eating elk meat I shot in 2013.

IMO you need to grow up and realize that you need more than a months worth of food and also learn to make some for yourself.
 

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Welcome from the Carolina's.

It does no good to itemize deductions on your tax return unless you have a large amount of deductions, large enough to beat the standard deduction given on the 1040 forms. Few people can do it. Usually the only way it will be feasible is if you run a home based business or you have a lot of medical bills for the year. And I mean a lot of medical bills. You only get to deduct a percentage of them.

Do your charitable work from the heart, not your checkbook.
 
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Welcome from the Carolina's.

It does no good to itemize deductions on your tax return unless you have a large amount of deductions, large enough to beat the standard deduction given on the 1040 forms. Few people can do it. Usually the only way it will be feasible is if you run a home based business or you have a lot of medical bills for the year. And I mean a lot of medical bills. You only get to deduct a percentage of them.

Do your charitable work from the heart, not your checkbook.
Thanks Boss Dog, I concur. In years past I have donated large sums of money, and they have not off set income enough to allow a credit. Medical bills? I have never achieved enough expense to gain a credit here either. It takes a large ratio of expense versus income.

Finally, I must repeat this: Do your charitable work from the heart, not your checkbook.
 

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Welcome from Houston. You have work to do. As to the gun issue, your making a large investment in your future survival, I would consider a means of protecting your investment first.
 

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Welcome from the Pacific Northwest.
I ran your question by one of our accounting geniuses here in our group. his question was do you have enough to itemize deduction? Will the food bank give you a receipt for the full amount or more that you donated? and then he asked is this guy only really only keeping a 30 day supply of food?
 
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