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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! I'm new to prepping and I've been doing a lot of thinking about starting my own garden. Wouldn't want anything too big right now because I wouldn't want to overwhelm myself.

Since it's November, I'll have some time I suppose until I can actually grow anything, so I'll have some time to decide what I want to grow. Any suggestions?

Or, is there any smaller plant I could get/grow in my house? Thought about getting an aloe plant.

Composting suggestions?

What about herbs? I'd like some info about those too.

Sorry for being all over the place! I'm just very excited! :)

**I also read on Pinterest how you can grow your own morel mushrooms. I think it said to go out and find the mushrooms, then bury them under an apple tree. We have an apple tree in our backyard so that's why I'd like to try. Does anyone think it could work?

Thank you!! :D
 

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Since you said you want to start small... I recommend a book called Sqare Foot Gardening. It's about getting maximum usage of smaller areas by mixing certain plants together.
 
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Great idea RaigenB. I think you will seriously be glad you took something like this on. Its rewarding to me to look at dinner on the table and know that I put it there through the hard work and efforts of myself. Makes it taste all the more better! Talk about sense of satisfaction. The from a prepping stand point there is the skill you learn and build and the fact that you now have added some sustainability to your life as well.

Now is the perfect time if your thinking about a small traditional garden like the Victory Gardens of WWII or even a small raised bed. This is a good time to start breaking the soil and mulching in some leaves and what not to prepare it for the spring growing season. I started out myself with a small raised bed made from cinder bricks and filled with soil and cow manure. It was only about 3x7 feet but dang did I get a gang of fresh veggies out of that one little bed! I took advantage of all of those holes in the cinder bricks and planted Strawberries as an added plus! If you like cut flowers this is also a good place to plant some flowers as well. The other benefit to that latter idea is it will draw in bees which will pollenate you veggies and give you a better harvest potentially.

Dont wanna take on something that monumental or have the space for it really? No problem. There is always container gardening and you would be surprised at just what one can do here. I have found that in most cases larger pots in the 3 cu ft area of things work best. While not a heirloom, the Patio variety of cherry Tomatoes can do very well and produce amazingly in a large planter pot with suitable soil. So can Bell Peppers and these are some of the more expensive things you buy at the grocery store. Something as unassuming as a Whiskey Barrel Half in the corner of an apartment patio can be made to look nice and provide some scoobie snacks too! I have grown Snow Peas, Jalapenos and Cucumbers very well in planter pots as well. Herbs do great in smaller planter pots! I grow several types each year, harvest and dry them then powder them up with a morter and pestle and add to a quart mason jar to be used through winter. In the mean time a few sprigs of fresh grown Rose Mary, Cilantro or Basil can really add to a home cooked dish!

Composting...if you got a little space you can do this all year round, no season there! It will give you something great to add to you container Garden or you traditional garden throughout the year as well making your soil better every year.

There is more to gardening than putting some seeds in some dirt and growing them and expecting bushel baskets of produce. It takes some time to build your soil up, it takes some skill to learn how to grow stuff. You might not do so great the first year but dont get discouraged. Your success will likely increase the more growing seasons you get under your belt.
 

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This post is right up my alley seeing that I am in the Heirloom Seed business. I would suggest for the novice gardeners to use the square foot gardening technique. However, most important make sure you're not planting hybrids seeds saved from food that came from the local produce market. Most hybrid are infertile amongst other reasons. So first thing I recommend Heirloom Seeds. Most will have a high germination rate and will produce fruit or vegetables in abundance.

Secondly, make sure your soil has been prepped properly. A nice compost with a mulch mix (depending on the type of seeds you are planting) is vital. Some seeds require more drainage then other. Some seeds like a mixture of soil e.g sandy mix, rich dirt etc. You'll want to make sure your soil has some type of mineral added to them of course I recommend Bloomin Minerals. It is a product that I have used with a tremendous about of success and many of my customers speak highly about it as well. Plants can not produce minerals. So minerals have to be either present in the soil or added to the soil. If your soil doesn't have worms in it, I would try to purchase some worms to help give it a proper balance as well.

Whichever vegetable or herb you're going to plant make sure you read about the follow should be the minimum knowledge you should know about your plants:

1. How much watering is required.
2. How much sunlight it can tolerate.
3. How much fertilizer to use.

Following the tip above will save you a great deal of time and heartache. Gardening is not easy. It does require a basic understanding (knowledge) and of course experience. You are right to start small. If you are planting with the intent of survivalism (for whatever reason) I would too develop a knowledge as to which herbs will be beneficial in a survival environment and include them into my garden as well. I am also a Certified Master Herbalist and I grown lots of herbs in my garden. I use herbs for the immune system, digestive system, blood system, inflammatory, and a host of other aliments.

Keep us inform how it all turns out. I am here if you have any questions.

Desert Marine
 

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Yes I too would highly recommend heirloom seeds to be sure. They will give you some interesting varieties not commonly seen and in my opinion, a lot more flavor! The added benefit is you can start building your stash of seeds with the first garden.

I started with the hybrids for ease of availability and their disease resistance and ability to produce heavily for my first gardening "experiment". I wanted to drop back into it slow and easy. Each year since though I have added more and more heirloom varieties to my garden every year and I am hoping soon to be all heirloom. Its been really rewarding thus far!

More and more nursery's are carrying more and more heirloom plants already started and seeds as well. So things out there are improving as the demand for them continues to rise. Tomatoes seem to be the most common heirlooms seen out there. Even places like Lowes and Home Depot are starting to carry them now a bit. I make it a point to ask every time I am in there about it to let them know there really is a market and demand out there for them. Its not like they have a crystal ball in their back pocket.

If your want to go heirloom right out of the starting gate going online is probably your best bet and I would start looking right now! While some of the big box stores sell them you need to know which varities are heirloom and which are not. Dont get suckered in the "Organiclly Grown" labels and such as often times this means very little in regards to being heirloom or not. Seeds Of Change is one such line of seeds commonly seen that falls into this catagory but only some of their varieties are actually heirloom. So be careful and know what your really getting!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you everyone! Such good mad helpful info :)
 

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I'm in Georgia and considering a first garden. When I was a kid in Ohio we had a garden almost every year. So I am no stranger to the work. But I am considering a small garden for the first year. Heirloom Seeds sounds like a great idea for putting away in my emergency kits but I think I'll be using the easier to grow varieties at the outset.
 

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I'm in Georgia and considering a first garden. When I was a kid in Ohio we had a garden almost every year. So I am no stranger to the work. But I am considering a small garden for the first year. Heirloom Seeds sounds like a great idea for putting away in my emergency kits but I think I'll be using the easier to grow varieties at the outset.
Hey Southern Dad,

If you're going to use Heirloom Seeds in a emergency situation I would use them in my regular gardening as well. That way you are familiar on how to grow them. I can tell like clock work when to expect my Heirloom Seeds to germination based on years of experience using them. The same hold true for whatever type of seeds you'll use. Use the seeds that you will be using if/when the SHTF. It only takes the learning curve away in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So I just got done talking to ny dad and he thinks it's a great idea to have a garden of our own! He said that my grandpa would more thank likely love to help me if needed (he always has a garden and used to farm). So that's great! And I also told him we should get a rain barrel, to help water it.
Now we are deciding what to grow.. Something easier, nothing too difficult for my first time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Nope, but that would be interesting to read about.
 

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A great book is Worms Ate My Garbage. Check it out on amazon.
 

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Hey Southern Dad,

If you're going to use Heirloom Seeds in a emergency situation I would use them in my regular gardening as well. That way you are familiar on how to grow them. I can tell like clock work when to expect my Heirloom Seeds to germination based on years of experience using them. The same hold true for whatever type of seeds you'll use. Use the seeds that you will be using if/when the SHTF. It only takes the learning curve away in the long run.
Excellent point, DM. However, my first year of gardening I plan to use locally grown plants that are ready to be planted. I'm maximizing my chances of success, that first year. After the first year, I may look to growing from seed so that I get that practice in. One bad thing about your business is that you only get to sell me seeds once. After that, I'll be using the seeds your plants produce for the next year's crop.
 

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This post is right up my alley seeing that I am in the Heirloom Seed business. I would suggest for the novice gardeners to use the square foot gardening technique. However, most important make sure you're not planting hybrids seeds saved from food that came from the local produce market. Most hybrid are infertile amongst other reasons. So first thing I recommend Heirloom Seeds. Most will have a high germination rate and will produce fruit or vegetables in abundance.

Secondly, make sure your soil has been prepped properly. A nice compost with a mulch mix (depending on the type of seeds you are planting) is vital. Some seeds require more drainage then other. Some seeds like a mixture of soil e.g sandy mix, rich dirt etc. You'll want to make sure your soil has some type of mineral added to them of course I recommend Bloomin Minerals. It is a product that I have used with a tremendous about of success and many of my customers speak highly about it as well. Plants can not produce minerals. So minerals have to be either present in the soil or added to the soil. If your soil doesn't have worms in it, I would try to purchase some worms to help give it a proper balance as well.

Whichever vegetable or herb you're going to plant make sure you read about the follow should be the minimum knowledge you should know about your plants:

1. How much watering is required.
2. How much sunlight it can tolerate.
3. How much fertilizer to use.

Following the tip above will save you a great deal of time and heartache. Gardening is not easy. It does require a basic understanding (knowledge) and of course experience. You are right to start small. If you are planting with the intent of survivalism (for whatever reason) I would too develop a knowledge as to which herbs will be beneficial in a survival environment and include them into my garden as well. I am also a Certified Master Herbalist and I grown lots of herbs in my garden. I use herbs for the immune system, digestive system, blood system, inflammatory, and a host of other aliments.

Keep us inform how it all turns out. I am here if you have any questions.

Desert Marine
Container gardening is a good way to start indoors, maybe with herbs. Sun light, water, and good soil are must haves. Back when I did a lot of flower gardening I used fish oil as a fertilizer. Stunk like heck for a day or so but boy did the flowers like it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Container gardening is a good way to start indoors, maybe with herbs. Sun light, water, and good soil are must haves. Back when I did a lot of flower gardening I used fish oil as a fertilizer. Stunk like heck for a day or so but boy did the flowers like it!
I was interested in maybe growing some herbs too. Any kind that that you suggest? I would also need to find a way to dehydrate them too.
 

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I was interested in maybe growing some herbs too. Any kind that that you suggest? I would also need to find a way to dehydrate them too.
Depends on how you like to flavor your foods. Basil, Rosemary, Thyme to name a few. I like chives too, kind of a garlic/onion combination.
 

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Rosemary, Cilantro, Basil and Thyme are 4 really great ones that lend themselves to be used fresh. Rosemary and Thyme are great with Chicken dishes, Cilantro with Mexican dishes, especially Pico De Gallo and Fajitas. Basil goes great in any Italian dishes. These are 4 that I grow a lot of and grow often. Instead of planting a big patch I usually plant a plant or two here and then a couple of weeks later plant another so that I always have a little growing and available to use. These are all best used fresh, especially the Cilantro, and give you the best aroma and taste when used fresh by far and away. This will also usually do very well in small pots in a window sill above the kitchen sink if you have one that gets sun and their pungent aroma wafting through the kitchen will really get your taste buds in high gear.

For those that lend themselves to drying, cutting the plant and then placing it in a dark cool dry place works well. When appropriately dried, you can then use a morter and pestle to grind them up and place in a small air tight container for later use. At least thats what I do anyways and I havent died yet, so its at least promising right?

I really place a premium on plants like this when gardening becuase spices are usually pretty expensive number 1 and number 2 they can make a ho-hum meal into a good tasting hearty dish in tough times when pickings might be slim. I think too they would make great barter items as well. Maybe I am over thinking this a bit but thats just how I feel about it anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Depends on how you like to flavor your foods. Basil, Rosemary, Thyme to name a few. I like chives too, kind of a garlic/onion combination.
True, I'll have to do some research haha. I really like Basil though
 
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