Prepper Forum / Survivalist Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,207 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all

I recently replaced my 35ish year old "Little Chief" smoker which was fading on me, the burner that cooked the wood chips was getting really bad, not that I'm complaining, the Little Chief has done me well.

My main focus on replacing was to take it off the grid so I decided on a propane powered unit:

New Camp Chef 18" Smoke Vault Smoker with Cover and Stainless Steel Door | eBay

This unit came with 3 really nice shelves but also has the ability to take 5, so I purchased 2 more.

I thawed out this years antelope meat and seasoned it like I always do and put it on the racks, here are my observations:

1. OMG this thing will handle easily double my old little chief if not 3x.
2. The electric unit on my little chief wasn't adjustable, kinda like plug and play (or smoke in this example), But with the new unit I had a HUGE amount of adjustments into temperature, on low power it was around 150 degrees, but on high power I got the unit up to almost 400.
3. For doing jerky I opted for very low power and had the unit cranking out 150-175 degrees without a problem.
4. At that temp I could dry a completely full rack of meat (about 8 lbs) in 4 hours, which is half the time of my old smoker with HALF+ less meat.

I did 2x loads of meat and the 20lb propane bottle doesn't seem empty, I should weigh it but phffft.

I will finish jerking my Antelope this week and will start working through my 2012 elk as I need the freezer space and trust me, my jerky is to die for, hehe.

I'll make a point to bring some to the Oklahoma gathering.

My point is that the smoker linked above is a great unit, I paid $200 locally for it, with the 3 shelves but I just picked up 2x more shelves for $15 yesterday.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
21,290 Posts
35 years out of a smoker is a great testimony to quality as well as you taking care of it. I've never owned a Propane or gas smoker, been a wood/charcoal guy all my life. I did get 15 years out of a New Braunfels Wood/Charcoal Smoker before the side box rusted out. The Pit section of the smoker was so well seasoned that I'll miss it tremendously but that just motivates me to season up a new one.

New Braunfels Smokers used to be an independent maker of grills/smokers but they were bought by the Char Broil Co some year back so I question their quality. I think the custom built BBQ pits and grills are still the best in terms of quality but price is obviously the issue now.

Happy Smoking MR!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
436 Posts
I've owned this one now going on 10 years and it still cooks great and similar in design. It uses propane to keep the temperature but uses wood for the smoke. I even have a small in oven/stove/roster that works well for smaller items with wood pellets called the Camerons Multi-Roaster. I don't think they make the smoker inserts any more but mine had one and works great for small items.

Automotive parking light Automotive lighting Hood Automotive tire Grille

My main one is shown below. I also have more racks and it is taller than shown here.

Food Kitchen appliance Recipe Home appliance Plant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,068 Posts
I have never tried a propane smoker. Like Slippy, I have always used charcoal/wood smokers. MR please keep us informed on how it works once you get it broken in. Presently, I have a Char Broil "Delux". I love the design but am not terribly impressed with the construction. I do not think it was meant to be used as much or as hard as Mrs Inor and I use it. The fire grates have all melted and the ash pans are starting to burn through. When this one finally gives up the ghost in a couple years, I was thinking of using it as a pattern for just building my own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,508 Posts
Hey all

I recently replaced my 35ish year old "Little Chief" smoker which was fading on me, the burner that cooked the wood chips was getting really bad, not that I'm complaining, the Little Chief has done me well.

My main focus on replacing was to take it off the grid so I decided on a propane powered unit:

New Camp Chef 18" Smoke Vault Smoker with Cover and Stainless Steel Door | eBay

This unit came with 3 really nice shelves but also has the ability to take 5, so I purchased 2 more.

I thawed out this years antelope meat and seasoned it like I always do and put it on the racks, here are my observations:

1. OMG this thing will handle easily double my old little chief if not 3x.
2. The electric unit on my little chief wasn't adjustable, kinda like plug and play (or smoke in this example), But with the new unit I had a HUGE amount of adjustments into temperature, on low power it was around 150 degrees, but on high power I got the unit up to almost 400.
3. For doing jerky I opted for very low power and had the unit cranking out 150-175 degrees without a problem.
4. At that temp I could dry a completely full rack of meat (about 8 lbs) in 4 hours, which is half the time of my old smoker with HALF+ less meat.

I did 2x loads of meat and the 20lb propane bottle doesn't seem empty, I should weigh it but phffft.

I will finish jerking my Antelope this week and will start working through my 2012 elk as I need the freezer space and trust me, my jerky is to die for, hehe.

I'll make a point to bring some to the Oklahoma gathering.

My point is that the smoker linked above is a great unit, I paid $200 locally for it, with the 3 shelves but I just picked up 2x more shelves for $15 yesterday.
I thought jerking antelope would probably be against the law! Although, he probably likes it..LOL Glad to hear you like your smoker. We will be smoking our stuff in the next few days as well. I have a barrel smoker that we built but there is a walk in smoker here we are going to try this year. I have never used it myself but was told it works great. It is an old walk in freezer turned into a smoker..
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
21,290 Posts
My simple Brisket recipe;

6 pack of Lone Star Beer
Beef Brisket (do not trim fat)
Spray Bottle of Apple Cider Vinegar
Make a rub with;
Sea Salt (1 tsp)
Paprika (2 tsp)
Brown Sugar (1/2 cup)
Garlic Salt (1 tsp)
Red Pepper (1 tsp)
White Pepper (1 tsp)
Black Pepper (1 tsp)
Crushed Red Pepper Flakes (1 tsp)
All Spice (1 tsp)

Mesquite Wood
Hickory Wood
Charcoal
Never ever ever use lighter fluid, use a charcoal chimney starter.

Open a full strength Lone Star beer and take 1 long pull on it, pour the rest over the brisket in a pan, cover and marinate over night. Finish the rest of the 6 pack of Lone Star.

Next day, combine all dry ingredients to form a rub. Spray the brisket with the Apple Cider Venegar and rub that brisket down. Use indirect heart and start the charcoal, when coals are hot add the Mesquite and Hickory in equal parts. (Regarding wood, for Brisket I like Mesquite and Hickory combo, my taste buds don't like the pungency of Mesquite alone so I mellow the Mesquite by adding hickory. For Pork BBQ, I only use Hickory or Pecan never Mesquite)

Slap that brisket on the grill and smoke it at 225 to 250 for at least 1.5 hours per pound. I may flip the brisket once or twice during the process so I don't care if the fat side is down or up to start. Every couple of hours, when you are messing with your fire, spray the Brisket with the Apple Cider Vinegar.

The last hour, I crank up my heat to about 350 and wrap the brisket in foil with sweet onions and a little bit of moisture, usually a small amount of beer or lemon/lime juice to coat the bottom of the foil...I have also used Coca Cola, Sprite, root beer and even some tequila margarita.

After the last hour in the foil at a higher temp, take the brisket off the grill and out of the foil. Let it rest for at about 15-20 minutes. Cut against the grain and add you sauce of choice. Enjoy!
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top