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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This one is my 2-man Eurohike Tamar, I picked it up a couple of years ago for about 40 GB pounds (55 US dollars), it's a 'proper' tent with a cotton inner and polyester outer for extended living in for longish periods. It's green of course to blend into the landscape.


This is my Texsport Camouflage Trail Tent, it's a 2-man single skin which means condensation could be a problem, but i keep the door unzipped for maximum ventilation. It's got a sewn-in groundsheet and anti-bug mesh. The advantage of single skins of course is that they're half the weight of a double skin.
It was dirt cheap at about 15 GB pounds (20 US dollars)


This is my Global Trek Commander dome tent at about the same low price as the Texsport, it's single skin and really tiny, i'm 5ft 8" and can just about squeeze in by lying diagonally, I got it from Woolworths Childrens Dept, so it's probably only meant to be a kids tent but i don't care, it's beautifully made.
The advantage of dome jobs is that they don't need to be pegged down and could therefore be erected on a concrete area, ideal if you're caught in a ruined post-Apocalyptic city with no grassy areas to peg a tent..:)
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Tents are a great way for staying alive if you can't find a solid house or cabin or whatever in a post-Apoc world.
Tents primary job is to keep the rain and snow off you, not necessarily to keep you warm. It's the job of your sleeping bag to keep you snug as a bug in a rug..:)
Tents also blend into the landscape better than vehs or cabins-



Recruit, Lackland AFB, Texas 1951
 

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I am trying to get a few tents. I have knowledge on how to make a good grounded tent out of a tarp and some stakes. But I would rather have something to keep me off the ground in the case of colder climates for my family and dogs. I am going to be looking around for something with a fast put up time, and a fast take down time. Let me know if you find anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
..I am going to be looking around for something with a fast put up time, and a fast take down time..
Pop-up tents like in this vid take zero time to pop up, then you just peg them down..:)
If I ever buy a popup I think i'd go for this 2-man Gelert job, the camo pattern blows my socks off!
You can get bigger ones and different makes and models and colours.
(it's a 15 minute vid but skip to 3:30 to see him put it up, then skip through the rest of it)-


PS- Popups are single-skin, meaning condensation inside can be a problem as with all single-skins whether popup or not.
Single skins are are therefore alright as brief overnight shelters, but if you plan on living in a tent non-stop for longer periods a 'proper' tent with an inner and outer skin is needed to eliminate the condensation problem, like my Eurohike at the top of this thread.

Incidentally the guy in the vid below has got a singleskin Texsport Camouflage Trail Tent, i've got one too, it's a bargain at only 20 bucks.
Get caught in the wilderness on a chilly rainy night without a tent and you die of hypothermia, so even a simple cheap little job like this will save your life..:)

 

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i gave my older son a fantastic 2 man tent. i have an 8 and 6, neither practical for bug out but are like 2 room condos i need to handle this. tents make sense. good light tents that is..
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
i gave my older son a fantastic 2 man tent. i have an 8 and 6, neither practical for bug out but are like 2 room condos i need to handle this. tents make sense. good light tents that is..
Yeah and another thing to remember is that although there are 1-man tents around, they're usually too small to sit up in. That's why I only bought 2-mans, even though I camp alone, so that I can eat supper and breakfast sitting up instead of having to eat laying down. I HATE eating while laying down!
PS- even some 2-mans are only just big enough to sit up in, so always check the height of tents in the advertising first to make sure you'll have enough headroom.
Sit down and measure from the floor to the top of your head with a tape measure, with me it's 37 inches (87 cm), so any tent I buy has to be at least that high so I can sit up in it.
(If you're buying a doubleskin tent remember it's the height of the inner you need to check)

Countless generations of Indians lived their whole life in tents (wigwams) for centuries including winters, without anything like fish hooks, metal tools, guns etc, so if they can do it I'm sure we can..;)



"Every part of this earth is sacred to my people. Every shining pine needle, every sandy shore, every mist in the dark woods, every clearing and humming insect is holy in the memory and experience of my people. The sap which courses through the trees carries the memories of the red man. We are part of the earth and it is part of us.
The perfumed flowers are our sisters; the deer, the horse, the great eagle, these are our brothers. The rocky crests, the juices in the meadows, the body heat of the pony, and man, all belong to the same family. The rivers are our brothers, they quench our thirst. The rivers carry our canoes.
The sight of your cities pains the eyes of the red man. There is no quiet place in the white man's cities. No place to hear the unfurling of leaves in spring or the rustle of the insect's wings. The clatter only seems to insult the ears."- Chief Seattle of the Suquamis


http://www.stevenredhead.com/Native/
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
My tents next to my hunting trailer:
Tents with tarps for heavy Florida summer rain:
Wow I just LURV that wigwam-shaped job..:)
We could live permanently in tents if we have to, but as a non-driver I have to watch the weight and can only buy small lightweight jobs that'll fit into my rucksack or saddlebag.
Here's my bike in mid-Wales during a cycling trip, my sleeping bag is crammed into the saddlebag, and my food bag and rolled tent are rubber-strapped on top, and the orange waterproof jacket is thrown over the whole caboodle-

 

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Discussion Starter #10
An inflatable camping pillow is essential if you don't want a cricked neck, this is mine, it's made of rubberised fabric covered in nice felt stuff and is light as a feather.
You can either blow it up by mouth or use a pump, I find it's most comfortable if only about three-quarter inflated.
In the day you can use it for sitting on-

 

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You guys have some great tents.

I think it's important to know how to create a shelter out of alternative materials too. You never know when someone is going to steal your supplies or evict you from your home. It's important to have some knowledge of what landscaping features make the best survival shelters and how to set up camp in a way that minimizes heat loss and maximizes safety.
 

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I'll be honest and admit that I am drooling over one of these... Link
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
1895 gunner whats the advantage of having a teepe shaped tent opposed to a dome? sure is neat!
Sorry to butt in, I haven't got a teepee but I should imagine an advantage is that you don't have to struggle to bend the poles and thread them through like you do with a dome.
And if you've got a genuine fullsize indian teepee you could have a fire in it for cooking and warmth because the smoke would be able to get out through the open flap at the top..:)
In fact we can buy indian teepees (below), there's been a hippy group living in them for about 25 years in Wales. (google 'tipi valley')



Below- Arapaho
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
I think it's important to know how to create a shelter out of alternative materials too. You never know when someone is going to steal your supplies or evict you from your home. It's important to have some knowledge of what landscaping features make the best survival shelters and how to set up camp in a way that minimizes heat loss and maximizes safety.
Yeah if we get wet we'll probably be dead of hypothermia by morning, so a simple roof is an absolute essential, this guy uses a simple piece of waterproof material. Sure it'll be draughty and bug-prone but at least he won't get wet when it rains, and he'll be snug and warm in his dry sleeping bag-


These doods have built a lean-to, not bad but it'll take time to build-


In a post-doomsday devastated city, shelter shouldn't be much problem, as there'll probably be bridges for shelter, or we could scavenge old sheets of wood or metal panelling to build a small shelter-
 

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Teepees are cool.. You guys are right we cannot forget about tents. I have severasl tents, but on one is small enough for bugging out..
 

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WVprepper: There's personal bug out... and vehicle bug out. I'm sure they fit in a car... which should get you to a safe area. Besides... you have to consider if you are alone or with someone and if you have to supply shelter for everyone of if they are on their own.
 

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You are right about that.. We may have other people with us who might not have shelter, but can help in other ways..
 
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