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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have been researching a little (I mean a little, don't have enough time to look up everything I'm interested in) about first aid products that I stock our general and individual first aid kits and blowout kits.

For a while now, there has been evidence that the hemostatic agent in Quikclot gets hot. Hot enough to burn the application area. Celox until recently only came in granules that you poured on the wound. Now they have z-folded gauze as well as a applicator syringe.

I'm looking at changing over to the Celox instead of Quikclot. Anyone smarter than me want to weigh in on that decision?
 

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Sounds like a wise decision. The gauze is best because the granules can get blown around in the wind. Fellow agent found this out at an auto accident on the side of the highway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Check this out Meangrean:

CELOX-A (Applicator, 6 gr) | www.chinookmed.com

From what I've read, you can put this in an entry wound and fill the wound channel to stop the bleeding and it supposedly does not cause clots in other parts of the body. Looks like a really good addition to a blowout kit or an IFAK.
 

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I have been spending alot of time reading and brushing up on my Medical knowledge. Now I am not expert by any stretch but everything I have read on the clotting products should be a absolute last resort. If everything else has failed to stop the bleeding, putting pressure on it, using pressure points and finally if a Tourniquet fails and you are not able to get to a ER than that's about the only time this should ever be used. Now with that said to my understanding they have addressed the burning issues with Quick-clot. They changed what they where using with it and its just the older product that had this burning issue. I still strongly recommend you do your own research but just sharing what I have learned in the last week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
LOL, Wesley...

Why spend hours researching when I can get others to do it? lol

I have done some research, just haven't had a chance to wade thru it all. Plus I wanted to see what other folks are using or what experience they have had with the different products available. Waiting for Nurseholly to chime in, too. Since she's a nurse, she probably knows of which she speaks. And she has a nice avatar!

Really though, this is important enough of a question to get several opinions on. The standard treatment does say to use these as a last resort, but I've seen some stuff that indicates using a hemostatic right away to prevent blood loss and the resulting shock, and then applying the bandage. This is probably a good idea when a hospital is not available within the Golden Hour. Anyone's thoughts on this?
 

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I have been spending alot of time reading and brushing up on my Medical knowledge. Now I am not expert by any stretch but everything I have read on the clotting products should be a absolute last resort. If everything else has failed to stop the bleeding, putting pressure on it, using pressure points and finally if a Tourniquet fails and you are not able to get to a ER than that's about the only time this should ever be used. Now with that said to my understanding they have addressed the burning issues with Quick-clot. They changed what they where using with it and its just the older product that had this burning issue. I still strongly recommend you do your own research but just sharing what I have learned in the last week.
It is true, think of it as a tourniquet. Unfortunately they passed this stuff out like candy in my agency without any training and that was quickly changed after some mishaps. It's a great tool but only to be used with proper training and as a last ditch effort.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I didn't save the website link and I can't find it now, but I'll keep looking. But the military medical guys are looking at making the recommendation to use the a hemostatic first. Or at least that was how I read it (it was an abstract from some research that one of the Army research arms). If I was reading it right, it obviously will take a while before the recommendation with filter out to the field. It makes sense to me from a common sense aspect. If I remember right, they did make mention of the problem of clotting in other parts of the body, but I think the big 3 (Quikclot, Celox, and Hemcon) were all good to go on that problem.

So Meangreen, I take it that the standard response right now is pressure, tourniquet and then hemostatic?

P.S. found this it's old but good reading
http://www.defence.gov.au/health/infocentre/journals/adfhj_nov07/adfhealth_8_2_70-75.html
 
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