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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi Guys,
Still yet another question,,,
I have decided to add an inverter to my solar system, I can go with 12 or 24 volts my controller will recognize
either one and work accordingly. And I haven't bought an inverter yet so I can do either.

Question is, If I wire the batteries in series for 24 volts and run a 24v to 120v inverter,,,,Or
Would the batteries last longer running the same appliances as it would if I was using a volt set up 12 to 120v inverter?

Note: I have a small 600 watt that I have used to experiment with but for a permanent inverter I think
I am going to go with a 1500 watt pure sine wave. -Bigger than I need but you just never know,,,,,,,
 

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It shouldn't make a difference to your batteries whether you wire them in parallel or series if you have a inverter for that voltage, the biggest advantage is if you go with 24 votes the cables to the inverter will only have to handle half the current as wiring for 12 volts. You would only have 1/2 the voltage drop across the same cables using 24 volt apposed to 12 volts.
 

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Stay with 12VDC is my recommendation. But due to cable/wire size required, you want the shortest distance between controller & batteries & then from batteries to inverter.
As mentioned, the reason for going with 24VDC is being able to use smaller wire for longer lengths. But it also means less available amperage.
 

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As an Off-gridder I can tell you that the main benefit/advantage from from 12v to 24v DC is that you will have less energy loss. You will also be able to use smaller gauge wiring when using 24v.

The down size is that for small systems like these Home Battery Bank Systems you'll be hard pressed to find 24v inverters as well as appliances to use them with. If your system is a small one, stick with 12V battery bank/inverter, as it is common, durable and you'll find many appliances DC as well as AC to use with your system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok it looks like I'll be going with the 12 volt inverter.
Someone in town has a 12 inverter for sale it's a China made but it's cheap.
I think I'll pick it up and give it a try.
 

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There is an fault in some of the replies here...

Batteries in series will have the combined (additive, 12+12=24) voltage, but the Amp Hour (amperage of a single battery in the circuit) of the given battery rating, say 600 amps remains a constant. There is also the problem with batteries that begin to age or lose their amperage capacitance... you will lose power as one battery begins to fail or if any batter goes totally dead you are in trouble. This will cause a voltage fade that could damage your inverter(s) quickly

Parallel systems however, are not affected voltage wise from a failing battery; you will still get the required voltage but lose amp-hours (run times). Your Amperage is additive by battery count (600+600+600+600=2400 amps)... this is a best-case scenario.
 

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There is an fault in some of the replies here...

Batteries in series will have the combined (additive, 12+12=24) voltage, but the Amp Hour (amperage of a single battery in the circuit) of the given battery rating, say 600 amps remains a constant. There is also the problem with batteries that begin to age or lose their amperage capacitance... you will lose power as one battery begins to fail or if any batter goes totally dead you are in trouble. This will cause a voltage fade that could damage your inverter(s) quickly

Parallel systems however, are not affected voltage wise from a failing battery; you will still get the required voltage but lose amp-hours (run times). Your Amperage is additive by battery count (600+600+600+600=2400 amps)... this is a best-case scenario.
This is a great point. On the other hand, though, batteries wired in series will last longer than a single battery of the desired voltage. For example, two 6v deep cycle batteries wired in series to make 12v will last longer and cost roughly the same as a single 12v deep cycle battery. So there are some tradeoffs to doing it either way and it is important to know the differences before you purchase.
 

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It seems to me, build a system as portable as possible with short big wires with 24 and 12 volt capacity. You might make a fixed system work for a while but when scrounge time comes you never know what you will find.
 
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